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Thread: QAYG Borders

  1. #1
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    QAYG Borders

    What started out to be a queen size quilt for my son and DIL, now has to be a king. I can quilt a queen on my Next Generation frame, but not a king. Planning on an E2E on body, and custom in borders. Thought about QAYG for the borders, but don't want a narrow strip to attach. Planning on putting top and bottom borders on, quilting that, then quilting the side borders, and attaching them like QAYG. Anyone done something like this? Any thoughts, suggestions?
    TIA
    Dolly
    Last edited by Dollyo; 06-05-2018 at 05:36 AM.
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  2. #2
    Super Member Kassaundra's Avatar
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    Yes I do this a lot. I don't like the look of narrow sashing either so almost never use it. I would cut 2 borders (top and bottom) pin them to the edge of the quilt body right sides facing (top border to top of quilt, bottom border to bottom of quilt). Find or know the 1/4 inch mark on you walking foot stitch the seam along the edge. (pinning is a must, I am not much of a pinner but here it is a must and lots of them). When finished flip them to correct position. Do a quick press so the seams don't "roll" back any and are cleanly placed. put a strip of batting in butting up to or slightly overlapping the seam edge, smooth fabric back over it making sure no fabric is out of place (the new outer edge of the fabric should line up) secure your 3 layers however you like (spray basting, basting, pins) and quilt. Repeat for the other borders. This method is called qayg stitch and flip.
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  3. #3
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    I removed my post because I told you to do what you are already doing. Doh.
    Last edited by themadpatter; 06-05-2018 at 09:20 AM. Reason: No reading comprehension yet this am

  4. #4
    Super Member Daylesewblessed's Avatar
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    I don't have a longarm, but I frequently attach borders using QAYG. The quilt size before borders is so much more manageable for me to quilt. I am not working with king size quilts, but the principle is the same.

  5. #5
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I need to start doing QAYG in the above manner as I get tired of sewing the little sashes on.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kassaundra View Post
    Yes I do this a lot. I don't like the look of narrow sashing either so almost never use it. I would cut 2 borders (top and bottom) pin them to the edge of the quilt body right sides facing (top border to top of quilt, bottom border to bottom of quilt). Find or know the 1/4 inch mark on you walking foot stitch the seam along the edge. (pinning is a must, I am not much of a pinner but here it is a must and lots of them). When finished flip them to correct position. Do a quick press so the seams don't "roll" back any and are cleanly placed. put a strip of batting in butting up to or slightly overlapping the seam edge, smooth fabric back over it making sure no fabric is out of place (the new outer edge of the fabric should line up) secure your 3 layers however you like (spray basting, basting, pins) and quilt. Repeat for the other borders. This method is called qayg stitch and flip.
    I wish I had done it this way. Instead, I cut borders for the front and back, sandwiched and quilted them, then added them to the quilt body...top & bottom first, then sides, then corner blocks. Quilting was a lot easier, but adding them to the quilt was trickier.

  7. #7
    Member christinelf's Avatar
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    Smile QAYG works for me

    I use QAYG in order to have smaller pieces to quilt with my sewing machine. I made a Star quilt for my daughter, each block different, front and back. I made and quilted all the blocks, and then needed it a bit larger. I made corner squares with machine embroidered hearts, and long pieces for sides and top and bottom. I made the borders and quilted them in just straight channels. I then added them with small borders to match the rest of the quilt.
    I gave it to my daughter and she has it on her bed in her new home. I had started the Stars back in the 1970’s, it was a long time coming.
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  8. #8
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    I have done this sort of thing. Marti Michell has a book, Machine Quilting in Sections that might be helpful, but the emphasis is on quilting on a DSM.
    “You can’t use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have.” ~Maya Angelou.
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