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Thread: Question about batting - new to quilting??

  1. #1
    Junior Member sbeddingfield's Avatar
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    I have made the top of a table runner, and almost finished some potholders for Christmas gifts and have a lap quilt I want to do next. I was wondering about batting - seems that the queen size Warm and Natural or other brands is the size usually on sale. But what is best - to buy the actual size you need or buy the bigger size and cut it up?
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Super Member drivingsusan's Avatar
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    I always buy Warm & Natural by the yard...as much as I can afford at the time. That way I have some on hand all the time!!
    As for your potholders you will need to get Insulbrite, it keeps the heat from transfering through the pot holder!!!
    Good luck and Happy Thanksgiving!

  3. #3
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    I would recommend you buy Warm and Natural, it's the nicest I've used to date.

    Buying more than you need or what you can afford by the metre/yard is a great idea for those times when you can't get to the quilt shop to finish off your projects.

    Joanne

  4. #4
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I love to buy by the yard...but the very smallest packaged I buy is the queen sized... some projects it is no problem to piece it together...I always find uses for the smaller leftovers too :wink:

  5. #5
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    I get warm and natural or warm and white by the yard - usually when Joann has a sale. I suggest that you try it and see how you like it.

    In the past, I have also used flannel for batting. It may work for the table runners.

  6. #6
    Super Member Boston1954's Avatar
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    I am with drivingsusan. My sister and I bought an entire roll and then split it. I am just now getting towards the end of my half. That was over a year ago.

  7. #7
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    When Joann's has the queen size warm and natural on sale for $9.99, it's a great deal. It's the equivalent of 3 yards.

  8. #8
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    It's more work to buy a bigger size and then cut to your needs. I have often found the smaller sizes on sale at Joann's online; with a free shipping coupon, I often stock up on the smaller sizes that way. I don't use Warm 'n' Natural, though, as the drape is stiffer than I like. I stock up on Mountain Mist Blue Ribbon batting (a very traditional all-cotton batting) in the sizes I need when it's on sale. As long as you have room to store the batting, it can be just as economical doing it this way as investing in larger sizes and cutting them down.

    A lot depends on how much money you have available to invest in batting. If you need a small size and only the large size is on sale, and you don't mind the extra work of cutting the batitng down to size and storing the remainder, this can be a good option.

  9. #9
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
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    I buy the W&N by the yard. It is wider and I always have left over batting for those smaller projects I am always making.

    Hobbs poly/cotton is a good one too.

  10. #10
    MM
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    How warm will a quilt be that's made with Warm and Natural? I bought a queen-size package when they were on sale at Joann's, but it seems very thin to me. Am making a winter quilt for my 3 year old grandson; would the warmth of W&N be equivalent to that of a blanket?

  11. #11
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MM
    How warm will a quilt be that's made with Warm and Natural? I bought a queen-size package when they were on sale at Joann's, but it seems very thin to me. Am making a winter quilt for my 3 year old grandson; would the warmth of W&N be equivalent to that of a blanket?
    Good question. I think it would be likely to be as warn as a blanket, but probably heavier. Max warmth requires air spaces between the fibers; that's one of the reasons down comforters are so warm. For Warm 'n' Natural, a lot depends on the type of blanket you would be comparing it too. My thoughts are that a WnN quilt would be warmer than a fleece blanket, about equal to a "box weave" cotton blanket (lots of air spaces), and less warm than a wool blanket (but probably also less heavy).

  12. #12
    Junior Member sbeddingfield's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone for your ideas and information. I can't wait to hit JoAnns and get more than I need - ha.
    Blessings,

  13. #13
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MM
    How warm will a quilt be that's made with Warm and Natural? I bought a queen-size package when they were on sale at Joann's, but it seems very thin to me. Am making a winter quilt for my 3 year old grandson; would the warmth of W&N be equivalent to that of a blanket?
    I love W&N and use it in a lot of quilts, but not ones I want to keep me warm in the winter. W&N simply isn't a heavy or thick enough batting. It makes a great summer weight quilt or quilts for those who live in the desert (as my DD & SIL do). I learned this because I used to live in the Mojave Desert where it reaches 120 in the summer and now I live in Idaho, where at least 2 months out of the year our ground is covered in snow. The quilts I made with W&N that worked great in a warmer climate simply do NOT keep me warm in the winter here. I use W&N in all my table runners, table cloths, lap quilts, et cetera and it does great. I love how thin and yet stable it is & it gives my wallhangings a wonderful drape, no sagging or anything that tends to happen when an item hangs for a long time. I always order my batting by the yard, except for wool batting which I buy in queen sizes when it is on sale. I haven't tried silk batting yet, though I hear it is an absolute dream to quilt through. Wool is wonderful to quilt through also, though if you are machine quilting it won't matter as much.

    If you know a bunch of other quilt ladies or know of a local guild, often you can collect batting from other people. Ask for a 6-inch square if possible and then put all of them together in a little photo book. You can sandwhich them and quilt them up. Keep track of what you do, what you think of it and how it works. Then you've got a sampler that you can refer back too. I think this is an excellent idea and I keep meaning to try it myself. I know every once in awhile I will see a box of sampler batting (usually Hancocks of Peducah) on sale. It's one of those things I want to buy so I can try out all the new battings that are coming out.

    Speaking of new battings, I've had a couple friends try the new bamboo batting and they HATE IT, HATE IT, HATE IT!! They say it beards up something horrible. I thought I would pass along their observations for anyone who might be thinking of trying it and wondered how well it's been received. No one in this area will use it that I know of and one store actually quit selling it. I figure I'll give them time to work out the bearding problem before I give it a try. Nothing frustrates me more than having my batting stick up out of my quilt, especially a light batting sticking through a dark fabric! :roll:

  14. #14
    MM
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    Tiffany, thanks so much for the info about batting. I think I'll save the W&N for some other projects and find something warmer for this quilt.

  15. #15
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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    I use warm and natural and I don't live in a desert. It's fine for me, but yes it does make a " flat" quilt. If you want puffier you'd probably have to use a poly batt and/or use a flannel backing.
    I have used the bamboo batt and had no problem with it bearding, I'm hand quilting a large quilt and I find it a little " limper" than the warm and natural.

  16. #16
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MM
    Tiffany, thanks so much for the info about batting. I think I'll save the W&N for some other projects and find something warmer for this quilt.
    You might like Hobbs Heirloom 80/20 batting (80% cotton/20% polyester). It is fluffier and fairly warm. If you really want *warm*, consider getting the wool batting in the Hobbs line.

  17. #17
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
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    I love the Hobbs wool batting! It quilts like a dream and is nice and warm during our frigid winter months here.

  18. #18
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    So far I have only used Warm and Natural or Warm and White, and last year I bought a whole bolt of W&N in the queen size width. (I've used quite a bit of it already and am planning to get another bolt when it's on sale.) Now I'm going to be getting a longarm soon, and I wonder whether I should continue with W&N or use a puffier batting. Does anyone have recommendations for what kind of batt to use with a longarm?


  19. #19
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunster
    So far I have only used Warm and Natural or Warm and White, and last year I bought a whole bolt of W&N in the queen size width. (I've used quite a bit of it already and am planning to get another bolt when it's on sale.) Now I'm going to be getting a longarm soon, and I wonder whether I should continue with W&N or use a puffier batting. Does anyone have recommendations for what kind of batt to use with a longarm?
    I'm sure people use Warm n Natural with longarms too. You might want to join the homequiltingsystems group at http://groups.yahoo.com ; lots of information there about all aspects of longarming. Be sure to check out the files thoroughly before posting.

  20. #20

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    There is a new batting out that contains bamboo. I don't like it at all as tiny pieces of fuzz push through with your needle. Karen in Canada

  21. #21
    Junior Member crazicorn's Avatar
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    I have used the bamboo batting and had no problems with it at all. :roll:

  22. #22
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kascie
    There is a new batting out that contains bamboo. I don't like it at all as tiny pieces of fuzz push through with your needle. Karen in Canada
    That is what all my friends who have tried it say. They hate how it beards up, especially when hand quilting. I know it is environmentally friendly (only takes 8 weeks to regrow harvested bamboo) but I think I'll wait until they work out the bearding problems before wasting my money on it.

    Those who say it works for them, did you hand or machine quilt with the bamboo batting?

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