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Thread: Question on batting...

  1. #1
    Super Member weasier22's Avatar
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    When using warm 'n natural batting, do you normally use single or double thickness?

  2. #2
    Super Member Treasureit's Avatar
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    I use single, but I don't like heavy quilts and live it a hot climate.

  3. #3
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
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    Single thickness has always been enough for me!

  4. #4
    Super Member Rose L's Avatar
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    I use the single for a more antique look to my quilts. It's a matter of personal preference but if you are planning to hand quilt, a thin batting is easier to work with and you'll get smaller stitches that way.

  5. #5
    Power Poster
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    Single.

  6. #6
    Super Member hobbykat1955's Avatar
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    Single

  7. #7
    Super Member mhunt1717's Avatar
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    Single

  8. #8
    Super Member NCquilter's Avatar
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    I use single layer.

  9. #9
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I use single layer , but have been known to use a layer of Warm and Natural and a layer of low loft poly .. it gives more "Puff" to the quilting.. really does give a nice effect and it warmer.

  10. #10
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    I find it interesting that many people think a quilt must have a THICK, as in really puffy?, batting. Thick heavy quilts were not all that common across the country and were often made using yet another quilt - worn out and recycled - inside as the batting.
    Of the THIRTY THOUSAND! quilts submitted to the World's Fair Century of Progress Expo in 1933, few if any quilts were in this style.

    If you are not making quilts from old clothing, in very basic patterns, for the sole purpose of keeping your family warm on winter nights, then the "modern" take on the batting issue is generally cotton, thin, well quilted.
    That does NOT negate the thick, big-pieced, tied/lightly quilted works, they ALL have their place.
    Jan in VA

  11. #11
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
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    Single except for my one son who loves them puffy and tied.

  12. #12
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    Single layer. Two layers would be hard to hand quilt for sure.

  13. #13
    Super Member weasier22's Avatar
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    Thank you everyone! I just love the board... I'm starting to quilt the 6 tops just finished and wasn't sure about the batting. Single it is!

  14. #14
    Super Member weasier22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jan in VA
    I find it interesting that many people think a quilt must have a THICK, as in really puffy?, batting. Thick heavy quilts were not all that common across the country and were often made using yet another quilt - worn out and recycled - inside as the batting.
    Of the THIRTY THOUSAND! quilts submitted to the World's Fair Century of Progress Expo in 1933, few if any quilts were in this style.

    If you are not making quilts from old clothing, in very basic patterns, for the sole purpose of keeping your family warm on winter nights, then the "modern" take on the batting issue is generally cotton, thin, well quilted.
    That does NOT negate the thick, big-pieced, tied/lightly quilted works, they ALL have their place.
    Jan in VA
    Thank you for your response and this very interesting information! I love learning more about quilting and this is certainly the place to learn! Happy to be here!

  15. #15
    Super Member quilterella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by weasier22
    When using warm 'n natural batting, do you normally use single or double thickness?
    I always use a single layer, that is usually enough, even in Canada, with the exception of one quilt. My oldest DGD is always cold and wanted her quilt to be heavy, so, I used a double layer of W&N, it still machine quilted like any other quilt, and, she loves it!

  16. #16
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    you can get batts in different lofts if you want a 'fluffier' quilt
    some quilters will layer a cotton and a wool batt for a very detailed quilted whole cloth- but for normal every day quilting single thickness of the batt chosen will be enough. read the packaging to see how close the batting has to be quilted - this is important! some batts need to be quilted every 2" (very densely) some you can have upto 10" between quilting lines. the package will also tell you the loft usually somewhere between 1/8"(very thin) - 3/4" (quite-lofty) it will have scrim- or not- with scrim (like warm and natural) the fibers are bonded to a center (fabric-like netting) batts without scrim are best for hand quilting. batts with scrim are good for machine quilting- they are firmer to work with, batts without scrim pull apart easily

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