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Thread: Quilt basting spray question, help me please!!

  1. #1
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    Quilt basting spray question, help me please!!

    I looked for an answer on the board before posting this question but did not find one, hope this is not a redundant question but I sure need some help.
    A friend asked me to make a LARGE table runner for their family Christmas table which will lay on top of a tablecloth. When I say large, the runner is 14 feet long. As it is so large, I am going to sew it like an envelope, turn right side out. It will not have a binding on it, so someone does not set stemware on the binding and turn the glass over. I am putting a nice quality flannel as the batting. My question: Because of the size, it was recommended to me that I spray baste the sandwich. As it will be turned right side out, spray basting it will require that I spray on the right sides of of the fabric sandwich I am concerned this will mark the fabric on the front and back. I could also spray the both sides of the flannel but again, I don't know if it will mark the front and back. Help me please, I am in a quandry!! The runner is finished and I'm at a standstill.

  2. #2
    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
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    I spray baste the right side of fabrics all the time, when I do machine embroidery. So here's what you do... follow the directions on the can of "temporary" spray adhesive. That's all you need to do. If you use KK2000 it will be gone within 2-4 days, do NOT put KK2000 in the washing machine until it is gone. If you use 505 it will take a little longer to disappear, or you can wash it and it will disappear that way.

    You'll get lots of advice on how to use spray adhesives, if you follow the directions on the can you're good to go!
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 05-10-2012 at 02:34 PM. Reason: PM to member
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  3. #3
    Super Member sahm4605's Avatar
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    depending on the spray I would go with spraying one side and then attaching and turning. then iron it out flat. if you feel that you need both sides secured then once you have ironed it flat right side out open it up and really carefully stick your arm in and spray a little at a time and then flatten and smooth as you work your way out of the pocket. hope this makes since.
    when life gets you down go and talk with a little kid. They will help you work out even the worst problems with their simple logic.

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    Christine, Thank you so much for the quick answer, I DID read your blog before I posted. I have two kinds of spray, "June Taylor" and "The Original Quilt Basting Spray, by Sullivan which is acid free. Do you recommend one over the other?

  5. #5
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    and you use the spray lightly, like hair spray. not too close and not too much. just spray and move your arm across. i'd only spray one side and smooth it out, then layer your way and stitch and turn. sounds like it will turn out great!
    "From hence only infer that an Englishman, of all men, ought not to despise foreigners as such and I think the inference is just, since what they are today, we were yesterday, and tomorrow they will be like us"
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  6. #6
    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sahm4605 View Post
    depending on the spray I would go with spraying one side and then attaching and turning. then iron it out flat. if you feel that you need both sides secured then once you have ironed it flat right side out open it up and really carefully stick your arm in and spray a little at a time and then flatten and smooth as you work your way out of the pocket. hope this makes since.
    Ironing a spray adhesive designed to disappear is not recommended. I would suggest another method, ironing the adhesive would be a mistake. Nativetexan has a great suggestion, using your hand to smooth it out and spray lightly.
    Last edited by Christine-; 05-10-2012 at 09:40 AM.
    https://quiltdasher.blogspot.com

    I like to make lists. I also like to leave them laying on my sewing table and then guess what's on the list while at the fabric store. Fun game.

  7. #7
    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DACO48 View Post
    Christine, Thank you so much for the quick answer, I DID read your blog before I posted. I have two kinds of spray, "June Taylor" and "The Original Quilt Basting Spray, by Sullivan which is acid free. Do you recommend one over the other?
    I've never used the Original, but I'd try the Original Quilt basting spray first. I've not had the best experience with June Taylor's, it spits blobs out. It may have been a bad can, but I ended up throwing it away.

    Be sure to let us know how it turns out!! I'd love to see a photo of your table runner too.
    Last edited by Christine-; 05-10-2012 at 09:50 AM.
    https://quiltdasher.blogspot.com

    I like to make lists. I also like to leave them laying on my sewing table and then guess what's on the list while at the fabric store. Fun game.

  8. #8
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I do use my iron , to smooth out sprayed sandwiches. I use it cold , with some brands. It helps get it very smooth.

  9. #9
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    I don't understand the need to spray baste the right side of the fabric at all for your table runner. Can't you just pin the two pieces of fabric right sides together, stitch around the envelope leaving the appropriate area unstitched, then baste the batting to one side (spray or pin), turn the sandwich, and quilt? Maybe I'm not thinking this through... ???

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    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I would never spray baste when using the "birthing" method! Maybe I am not understanding something here? Spray basting will make the surfaces tacky, which in my mind is going to make the entire turning process a disastrous mess.

    You also do not want basting spray on the right sides of the fabric. How on earth could you quilt surfaces that have basting spray on them? They will be tacky!

    I would spray baste in the normal manner but leaving the edges free of spray (cover with paper), quilt, trim the batting to size, then trim the top and backing edges, turn them under and iron, then hand or machine sew the edges closed.

    Sorry, I am just not understanding at all why anyone would recommend using spray basting with the "birthing" method of turning a quilt! Am I completely clueless here (which, by the way, is entirely possible ). To me, the key phrase of "sewing like an envelope" and then turning means the birthing method. Maybe I am off on that???
    Last edited by Prism99; 05-10-2012 at 10:38 AM.

  11. #11
    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    I would never spray baste when using the "birthing" method! Maybe I am not understanding something here? Spray basting will make the surfaces tacky, which in my mind is going to make the entire turning process a disastrous mess.
    Yes, you're not understanding something here. .... it's ok... life will go on...all is calm.... the gal making the tablerunner has it under control.
    Last edited by Christine-; 05-10-2012 at 10:43 AM.
    https://quiltdasher.blogspot.com

    I like to make lists. I also like to leave them laying on my sewing table and then guess what's on the list while at the fabric store. Fun game.

  12. #12
    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    I don't understand the need to spray baste the right side of the fabric at all for your table runner.
    Yes, you're not understanding here. .... it's ok... life will go on...all is calm.... the gal making the table runner has it under control.
    https://quiltdasher.blogspot.com

    I like to make lists. I also like to leave them laying on my sewing table and then guess what's on the list while at the fabric store. Fun game.

  13. #13
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Would someone be kind enough to explain what I am missing? It would be nice to know!

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    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    Would someone be kind enough to explain what I am missing? It would be nice to know!
    All you need to do is read the original post. Post #1.

    There are more ways than 1 to skin a cat... and she's chosen to use TEMPORARY spray basting instead of pins (for a good reason). I'm sure we could debate til the cows come home whether she should use pins or spray... but all that matters is that she has it under control and has a good plan. Let's not turn this into another 'quilt police' discussion, OK?

    (By the way, I grew up on a farm...did you know cows don't come home? You have to go get them....)
    Last edited by Christine-; 05-10-2012 at 10:57 AM.
    https://quiltdasher.blogspot.com

    I like to make lists. I also like to leave them laying on my sewing table and then guess what's on the list while at the fabric store. Fun game.

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    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine- View Post
    (By the way, I grew up on a farm...did you know cows don't come home? You have to go get them....)
    ... or shake the feed can!
    https://quiltdasher.blogspot.com

    I like to make lists. I also like to leave them laying on my sewing table and then guess what's on the list while at the fabric store. Fun game.

  16. #16
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    My dining room table is 17 feet. As I like a runner to hang, I make mine 18 or 19 feet. This may not work for this one as you are so far along, but I have made all mine quilt-as-you go. I piece the top and cut about 3 feet of the backing and batting, quilt to within about 4" of where the backing ends, sew a new piece of backing on and join a new piece of batting. I space it so both seams aren't in the same spot. I bind by bringing the backing to the front. I use warm and natural, and the stemware seems to do OK. I will say that my "crystal" (it's only glass) does have a rather large stable base.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
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    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    Would someone be kind enough to explain what I am missing? It would be nice to know!
    I'm with you. I think spray basting before you turn it will just turn into a giant, tacky mess.

  18. #18
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine- View Post
    Yes, you're not understanding something here. .... it's ok... life will go on...all is calm.... the gal making the tablerunner has it under control.
    If she has it under control why would she be asking for help?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DACO48 View Post
    I looked for an answer on the board before posting this question but did not find one, hope this is not a redundant question but I sure need some help.
    A friend asked me to make a LARGE table runner for their family Christmas table which will lay on top of a tablecloth. When I say large, the runner is 14 feet long. As it is so large, I am going to sew it like an envelope, turn right side out. It will not have a binding on it, so someone does not set stemware on the binding and turn the glass over. I am putting a nice quality flannel as the batting. My question: Because of the size, it was recommended to me that I spray baste the sandwich. As it will be turned right side out, spray basting it will require that I spray on the right sides of of the fabric sandwich I am concerned this will mark the fabric on the front and back. I could also spray the both sides of the flannel but again, I don't know if it will mark the front and back. Help me please, I am in a quandry!! The runner is finished and I'm at a standstill.

    I would use starch and iron all three layers together at the same time and pin baste. Then sew around the outside edge and turn. Then I would iron again and pin baste so there's no shifting while you quilt it. The other solution would be to use a single layer binding. That way you can just layer and quilt and bind like you would anything else.

  20. #20
    Super Member PurplePassion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine- View Post
    All you need to do is read the original post. Post #1.

    There are more ways than 1 to skin a cat... and she's chosen to use TEMPORARY spray basting instead of pins (for a good reason). I'm sure we could debate til the cows come home whether she should use pins or spray... but all that matters is that she has it under control and has a good plan. Let's not turn this into another 'quilt police' discussion, OK?

    (By the way, I grew up on a farm...did you know cows don't come home? You have to go get them....)
    I think Prism99 was just asking politely for an explanation. She wasn't judging. There is no need to be rude to her. I don't understand why you would use basting spray for the birthing method either>

  21. #21
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    I could see maybe spraying the back of the top and sitting it on the batt, then placing the backing fabric on top of the sandwich, with right sides together and sewing around but leaving a spot to turn. The spray bast would keep the top and batt connected while you turn it. You could then smooth it out and when you had it perfect, stick your arm in the hole and lightly spray the back fabric and then smooth it again. Is that what you mean? Let us know how it works out for you.

  22. #22
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    I also don't understand how you can successfuly spray baste if you are going to do the envelope technique. I would think it would be very difficult to get it smooth when you turn it inside out. Also with something that narrow, pinning should be sufficient to hold it together when quilting. I believe you have a problem there.
    And you say you don't want to put a binding on it because containers of liquid might tip over. Won't the same thing happen with the edges anyway since there will be a bump on the edges.

  23. #23
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    I could see maybe spraying the back of the top and sitting it on the batt, then placing the backing fabric on top of the sandwich, with right sides together and sewing around but leaving a spot to turn. The spray bast would keep the top and batt connected while you turn it. You could then smooth it out and when you had it perfect, stick your arm in the hole and lightly spray the back fabric and then smooth it again. Is that what you mean? Let us know how it works out for you.
    I can understand doing that. Thanks so much for the explanation!

    What is throwing me off now in the original post is the mention of spraying the right side of the fabric. Here is what I lifted from that post:
    "As it will be turned right side out, spray basting it will require that I spray on the right sides of of the fabric sandwich I am concerned this will mark the fabric on the front and back."

    As far as I can figure out, no one would ever want to spray on the right sides of the fabric sandwich.

  24. #24
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    hmmm...seems like the recommendation of the majority (including myself) is not to spray baste, at least not right sides together. Like someone said, more than one way to skin a cat... and methinks the cat prefers not to be skinned at all. Just be very sure to wash that flannel batting in very hot water - maybe several times - because flannel often shrinks more than other fabrics, and a table topper will need to be washed frequently.

    Another way to make this would be to go ahead and quilt as usual, but use a facing on the edges rather than binding or birthing. I can't think of any real advantage to this method, just giving you more options.

  25. #25
    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
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    Dear quilt police, you weren't asked to give your opinion on basting spray use, but now that you've weighed in on the subject, could you go back to quilting now? Geesh, you never know what will set some folks off on a tangent.

    It makes sense to use temporary spray adhesive on the right sides of the fabric but it's apparently a hot button for the police...so if you'll start your own topic separate from this one, and let us discuss the use of temporary spray adhesive without the police shouting us down it would be appreciated.



    Last edited by Christine-; 05-10-2012 at 05:45 PM.
    https://quiltdasher.blogspot.com

    I like to make lists. I also like to leave them laying on my sewing table and then guess what's on the list while at the fabric store. Fun game.

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