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quilt repair?

quilt repair?

Old 09-20-2010, 06:14 AM
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I have a quilt that my grandmother made sometime in the 90s. So technically it's not an antique. But, she used a fabric that is not 100% cotton, and almost every seam involved with that fabric is coming apart because it is fraying. I was thinking I could just hand stitch to repair the blocks, but after seeing the fraying, I know its just going to continue and I'll be doing this again very soon.

I think now I'm going to need to replace that fabric. I read several things online about just appliqueing a new patch on top of the damaged piece? Is this the easiest/best option? I'm a bit afraid of trying to take the blocks apart, 1) because they're not pieced evenly, which means I would basically be making a new quilt and 2) I get the idea I'm supposed to maintain whatever stability and integrity the quilt has to begin with. This was my grandmothers first and only quilt, as noted by the uneven seams and block piecing. It is not a scrap quilt, so I will be replacing about 1/10 of the fabric in the quilt top.

I need some ideas!! This will be my first quilt repair!! I want to be able to continue to use the quilt for years to come, as its very warm and snuggly. And I cannot afford to hire someone to do it for me, so please don't suggest it. I have the time and determination to do this.
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Old 09-20-2010, 06:29 AM
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If you have the time and determination -

1) You've decided that this one fabric is a PIDA (pain in de armpit)

2) So the decision is what to do next:

a) cover the affected areas with something else
or
b) remove and replace

3) If this is a tied quilt, removing and replacing the frayed squares might be an option.

4) If it has been quilted, I think I would go with just covering the bad spots.
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Old 09-20-2010, 06:32 AM
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Would it be practical to applique strips of coordinating fabric over the seam lines? make strips wide enough to cover the frayed portions and stitch down both sides of the strip.
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Old 09-20-2010, 06:40 AM
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If not too large an area, you can slip a piece of fusible under the fraying area and press. Want to bond the fraying fabric.
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Old 09-20-2010, 07:27 AM
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Okay...the baby went to sleep and I was able to get some pictures.

EDITED: stupid blackberry won't upload the pics!! I guess I'll have to wait til I get home! Argh!!
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Old 09-20-2010, 07:27 AM
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Okay...the baby went to sleep and I was able to get some pictures.
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Old 09-20-2010, 07:34 AM
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What about hand stitching pieces of sheer tulle over the blocks? That is one way conservators protect the integrity of quilts. Of course, those quilts are not actually used and don't have to go through washing machines and dryers.
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Old 09-20-2010, 08:46 AM
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i have a quilt that my mil made - some of the fabric is fraying at the seams and i took sheer tulle and hand stitched it over the frayed places. it's not that old but some of the fabric has metallic thread and it doesn't hold up well. i have a quilt my grandmother made for me when i was very young maybe 70 yrs ago that is fraying in places that i need to do the same. i don't use that quilt now - it just hangs on a quilt hanger in my bedroom. i've read that black tulle is better to mend with than white. never tried it tho.
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Old 09-21-2010, 05:07 AM
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Maybe you could machine-stitch narrow sashing strip down and across all the block seams if the the blocks are square.
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