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Thread: quilting blind spots

  1. #1
    Senior Member alisonquilts's Avatar
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    quilting blind spots

    Hi y'all,

    I'm wondering if any of you have "quilting blind spots". There are several things that I do the same way every time, even though each time I say to myself (usually when I am halfway done) "Wow, this would have been much easier if I had done it this other way!" My current example is SITD around some stars: I carefully thought it out beforehand so that I could approximate continuous line quilting...but once I started quilting I reverted immediately to the (laborious) way I always do it, with a gazillion threads to bury. It's as if my brain will only allow me to do certain things one way.

    Anyone else have examples of this?

    Alison

  2. #2
    Power Poster Boston1954's Avatar
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    I think I know what you mean. I have had those same thoughts myself. Guess that's why we have the phrase "creature of habit".
    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake. - Anne L. Fulton

    I am from the South....39 miles south of Boston.

  3. #3
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    I know what you mean ... need to think as to what mine are.

    Creating a new habit is hard!

    Here's an old one ... when I was learning to use the knee lift ... I kept reverting back to the memory of using the knee pedal on the sewing machine when I was a kid! I finally conquered that, by moving the foot pedal to my left foot, and let my right have nothing to do with the gas!

    Another ... when PPing I learned to press after I stitched then trim the seam. And then press again
    A great aha moment came ... there was no need to press first ... trim then press after.
    That took a long time to get in the habit ... and guess what? when I don't PP for awhile, I revert to the first method and have to re-train myself! UGH!
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  4. #4
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    I still draw lines on flying geese. My friend said I'm wasting too much time and that I can sew a straight line and i know she's right, but I can't help myself, so I waste a lot of time drawing the lines on each one. I do the same when binding. I draw a line on each piece of binding. It does take a lot of extra time. I'm just too chicken to just sew straight across. I'm sure I can sew a straight line, but I don't dare try it.

    And I use pins all the time. I know I don't need to, but I always pin everything. Wasting time pinning and drawing lines!!
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  5. #5
    Super Member MartiMorga's Avatar
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    No comment!!! LOL.
    God Bless Quilters and Sewers
    Marti

  6. #6
    Senior Member alisonquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE View Post
    ...That took a long time to get in the habit ... and guess what? when I don't PP for awhile, I revert to the first method and have to re-train myself! UGH!
    This is exactly what I mean! You recognize there is a better way, teach yourself the better way...and then revert as soon as you stop actively thinking about it.

    Quote Originally Posted by jcrow View Post
    I still draw lines on flying geese. My friend said I'm wasting too much time and that I can sew a straight line and i know she's right, but I can't help myself, so I waste a lot of time drawing the lines on each one. I do the same when binding. I draw a line on each piece of binding. It does take a lot of extra time. I'm just too chicken to just sew straight across. I'm sure I can sew a straight line, but I don't dare try it.

    And I use pins all the time. I know I don't need to, but I always pin everything. Wasting time pinning and drawing lines!!
    I haven't done enough flying geese to really know the tricks, and whether drawing lines is a necessity or a crutch. I do think pins are wonderful....

    Another of my blind spots is always ironing my (washed) fabric before folding it up and stuffing it into my fabric bins. I don't have a dryer so all of my fabric is dried on a line, and is therefore not very wrinkly. Even as I am ironing it I say to myself "You KNOW you are going to have to iron this again before you cut/use it...why are you spending time ironing it now?!" And yet I press on...

    Alison

  7. #7
    Senior Member Daffy Daphne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcrow View Post
    I still draw lines on flying geese. My friend said I'm wasting too much time and that I can sew a straight line and i know she's right, but I can't help myself, so I waste a lot of time drawing the lines on each one. I do the same when binding. I draw a line on each piece of binding. It does take a lot of extra time. I'm just too chicken to just sew straight across. I'm sure I can sew a straight line, but I don't dare try it.

    And I use pins all the time. I know I don't need to, but I always pin everything. Wasting time pinning and drawing lines!!
    Well, I dunno if it's time wasted if you get the results you like. Pinning (and drawing lines) saves me a lot of ripping!

  8. #8
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    "Another of my blind spots is always ironing my (washed) fabric before folding it up and stuffing it into my fabric bins. I don't have a dryer so all of my fabric is dried on a line, and is therefore not very wrinkly. Even as I am ironing it I say to myself "You KNOW you are going to have to iron this again before you cut/use it...why are you spending time ironing it now?!" And yet I press on...:

    Hey, by ironing the fabric stays nicer and feels better when I pet it. Also it takes up less room. At least that is what I tell myself.
    Have fun quilting! If it isn't fun, you will miss a lot.
    ali

  9. #9
    Senior Member alisonquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AliKat View Post
    Hey, by ironing the fabric stays nicer and feels better when I pet it. Also it takes up less room. At least that is what I tell myself.
    Ha! I agree the fabric feels nicer...and I sometimes think I do the extra ironing just to play with the fabric more!

    Alison

  10. #10
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    I iron the fabric after washing (before putting it away) if it's really rumpled.

    Otherwise, I just fold the fabric after taking it off the line or out of the dryer until I'm ready to cut it. Then I will iron/press it. I'm not THAT fond of ironing to do it twice!

  11. #11
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    I know I can use the thread cutter on my machine after I finish a seam but I always use scissors. I keep reminding myself that it's there for a purpose, but somehow I just developed that habit.

  12. #12
    Super Member Emma S's Avatar
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    Yes and yes. I read about a different way to do a process, for example binding, I mark it make a mental note to try it, then proceed to do it the old way. If I am doing a new to me process it sometimes evolves as I am doing it. Just recently FM quilting was like this, the quilting I started with is different than the quilting I ended with. Oh well, I call it the creative process.

  13. #13
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
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    Do you think its like the body memory we get when we FMQ? You get into a flow and just keep on going?

  14. #14
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    We are creatures of habit...................

  15. #15
    Super Member jeanharville's Avatar
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    I do the same things all of you have mentioned. Very interesting. Isn't it fascinating how we adult humans seem to work on auto-pilot even when we think we're driving?
    jean

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