Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 34

Thread: Quilting frame for machine quilting

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2
    Im thinking of buying a quilting frame and would love some help as to what others have and any suggestions as to what to look for and or stay away from.
    Have looked at the Grace frame and the A-1 quilting frame
    both with the Janome 1600P

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oh.
    Posts
    798
    Glad to hear you are "thinking" about this idea of buying sewing equipment. One word of advice.....do not make a snap decision.Take your time to research everything available. Keep notes. Ask questions.

    There are lots of quilters with all sorts of equipemnt, and most will share with you what they chose, and how they like it, or, if they chose too quickly and do not like the choice, they will tell you what they wish they had bought.

    I spent about 8 months considering my options. I joined 4 groups so I could ask other quilters what they use and how they like it. That way, you will have a better idea of what is availble and what works and what could have some area for improvement.,

    Happy hunting.

    June

  3. #3
    bj
    bj is offline
    Super Member bj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ft. Worth, Texas
    Posts
    3,569
    I have a little frame from JoAnn's that is made out of PVC pipe. I like it okay when I'm tying a quilt. If I want to machine quilt, I just have to pin really good and manhandle it around my machine :) I've only hand quilted a couple of table runners, and I just used a hoop to do those. Good luck on making your decision.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oh.
    Posts
    798
    Perhaps we need to clarify what we are asking about.

    I suspect Frannymac is talking about a frame to use a machine with.

    Or are you talking about hand quilting?

    those frames are as different as night and day.


  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    1,844
    I have a good friend that has the gracie frame w/that exact Janome and loves it. She has had no problems at all and does quilting on the side. (Other then she cracked one of the strip runners and Gracie sent out a new one w/no questions asked)I also know someone that has a New Joy w/that same machine and she likes hers too. I like the gracie over the New Joy personally because of the height. Both are very comparable in price too...keep us posted on your decision..Skeat

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2
    thank you for this unfortunately Im in Tasmania and where I live we only have 1 sewing machine shop so not much choice apart from if I purchase from the mainland or internet

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oh.
    Posts
    798
    OOOh, that does pose a problem. There are lots of good options here in the
    U.S. but I have no idea what the shipping costs would be. Perhaps your shop will give you the names of some of their customers so you can see how well satisfied they have been with the equipment.

    I hope you find something that will work for you.

    June

  8. #8
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Camarillo, California
    Posts
    35,480
    I don't know much about quilting frames but I wanted to say Welcome from Southern California!!!

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    922
    Also don't know anything about quilting frames, hope you can find what you want with reasonable shipping costs.

    Welcome from the Ozarks in Missouri.

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Silicon Valley in CA
    Posts
    1,687
    I bought a Viking Inspira Quilting Frame a couple years ago. I have not been happy with it. You start out with about 8 to 9 inches you can quilt. Then comes the problem. With each wind, you have less area that can be quilted. The space between the needle & the machine limits you. Once you get toward the end of the quilt, you have so much of the quilt wound up there isn't much quilting room. Your pattern could only be 4 or 5 inches deep (if that).
    Also you have to consider where you will set it up. You need at least 14 feet long to set it up & then another 3-6 feet is nice to be able to move around it. That is if you want to do more than just a small quilt

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oh.
    Posts
    798
    Jannie, thanks for sharing the problem you have had with your frame and machine combo. While I do not know anything about this particular frame or machine, I do know that those who have tried to use a 9 inch sewing machine have encountered a similar experience.

    You explained it very well. You start out with a 9 inch quilting space, but if you are going to make large quilts, the more fabrics/layers you have to roll on the take-up pole, the less your quilting space.

    These frames are designed to roll the finished area so that they fill the space in the arm of the machine. The larger the roll, the more decreased is the quilting space on the quilt as you work your way toward the end of the quilt. If you plan to do only crib quilts or wall hangings, the 9 inch arm would work well. Some members have them and get along fine with them. There are some who have been disappointed.

    Please be aware that there are some other options. There are some machines that have 13 and 15 inch arms. They are reasonable in price and give you more option for having more quilting space. I personally chose a 13 inch arm and have been satisfied with the way I am able to finish my quilts. Being reduced to 4 or 5 inches of quilting space could be very frustrating.

    For anyone with questions, please send me a PM.

    June

  12. #12
    kd124's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Camas, Washington
    Posts
    2,597
    Like Jannie, I work on an inspira and have a Pfaff with a 9' throat. I have the same problem. We discovered that with larger quilts, it is easier to roll side to side instead of top to bottom. Recently, my Sis got a computer to put on the machine to do the fancy stitching. Now we need to be more careful about the width because like Jannie said it can get pretty narrow. If we had known then what we know now, we probably would have gotten a machine with a larger throat.

  13. #13
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Silicon Valley in CA
    Posts
    1,687
    After getting my Inspira frame & being frustrated, I started watching demos at quilt shows. No one ever says anything about the limited space you have after winding the quilt. My feeling is they make it sound like you are going to be able to get the same results as the long arm quilters -- not true. I would suggest looking around & asking lots of questions before settling on any one machine. Also if you can rent the machine for an hour or 2 to get the feel of it, it would be money well spent!

  14. #14
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    currently central new jersey
    Posts
    8,700
    i started out with the new joy frame and the brother 1500s. the machine was great, but the throat was too small.

    on the new joy frame the take-up roller and the roller right in front of you has so little space to start that when you begin you can only quilt a, say, 7-8' block comfortably.. beyond that, the nose of the machine bumps into the front roller. by the time the quilt is all rolled up the machine can't move forward enough to quilt anything greater than 5" if you really horse it around. that's because the bulk of the quilt under the throat is preventing the machine from sliding forward any further. because at this point the bulk is hitting the back of the throat to keep it from moving.

    i sold it. i got the tin lizzie 18. 18 inches in the throat. the frame is the typical good-quality wood frame used by two other companies. the machine is not as smooth as the brother but i have plenty of room for a 12-14" block easily.

    i'm sorry i didn't save up a little longer and get this one first. i wasted time and money the first time around. i don't know if i would ever spend for a top-quality quilter because this is for fun and not a career for me.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oh.
    Posts
    798
    I am very glad we are having this dialogue. Hopefully many of the board members will read this information and file it away for future reference. You may not be planning to buy a quilting machine soon, but eventually you may think seriously about having one. This information should help others avoid the problems that have been mentioned here, thus saving some money and heartache by other members.

    Thanks to those of you who have added your experience. Quilts are good people always willing to help others.

    June

  16. #16
    Super Member Mamagus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Newfoundland Canada
    Posts
    1,701
    Does anyone else have anything to add to this thread? I am saving my loonies to buy a frame for Janome 6600 and while I am sure the smaller throat size will limit me I'd like to hear more opinions on this topic! :wink:

  17. #17
    Senior Member LoriJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    706
    I have a Janome 6600 and bought a Grace frame used. I've had the same experience as the others, the space to quilt gets real small real quick! The bigger throat space of the 6600 helps, but not by much. I'm going to put the frame on craigs list and try to at least get what I paid out of it and then save up for a long arm.

  18. #18
    Super Member Mamagus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Newfoundland Canada
    Posts
    1,701
    Quote Originally Posted by LoriJ
    I have a Janome 6600 and bought a Grace frame used. I've had the same experience as the others, the space to quilt gets real small real quick! The bigger throat space of the 6600 helps, but not by much. I'm going to put the frame on craigs list and try to at least get what I paid out of it and then save up for a long arm.
    But wouldn't you need the frame for the long arm too?

  19. #19
    Senior Member LoriJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    706
    the grace frame that I have is built to hold a regular home machine. When I get a long arm, I'm going to get the frame that is built for it (whatever brand I decide on).

  20. #20
    Super Member Mamagus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Newfoundland Canada
    Posts
    1,701
    OHH! I thought that if I bought a frame and the Janome didn't work to my satisfaction I could use the frame if I bought a long arm machine.

  21. #21
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    currently central new jersey
    Posts
    8,700
    on the frames, they are made so that the space between the rollup bar and the front bar are designed for the throat size. so if you have a 24" throat, you need a much larger working field than if you have say a 9" throat. I THINK that's because someone decided that if only a sideways twin would fit within the throat of the machine, you shouldn't need more than 'x' inches on the rollup bar.

    truthfully, if you want to COMFORTABLY do a queen in one piece on a machine, you need at least 15". if you want to do it on a home machine, you can do it in sections, sew the sections face-to-face, and slipstitch on the back. if that gives you time to save for the right machine for you, then do it.
    remember, there's no such thing as temporary.

  22. #22

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    1,844
    I guess I will keep doing what I am doing....using my 6600 janome...no frame:)LOL I just can not justify spending the thousands to give me convienience and comfort and great throat space since I only want to do my own...never anyone else:)So sad..as I am sure there are many more of us in the same forever bucket!:)LOL Thanks for the tidbits-Skeat

  23. #23
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Sleepy Hollow, NY
    Posts
    4,780
    the new grace pinnacle takes a machine up to 18 inches and the mini pinni takes a machine up to 13 inches.

    so you could always start smaller and when you have more money buy the bigger throat machine.

  24. #24
    Super Member Mamagus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Newfoundland Canada
    Posts
    1,701
    Thanks Klue,
    That's more what I was thinking. If I bought the frame and liked doing it (please don't suggest renting a machine for a hour or two - that does NOT happen here in Newfoundland) then I could save up for a long arm. I don't want to spend my money on something that would be useless to me if "long arming" was my next passion in life!

    Next question... how much room does one of these ponies require? I can set up in my basement if it needs more than 12 feet!

  25. #25
    Super Member Yarn or Fabric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    3,393
    If you do a quilt as you go more or less you can really add up that quilting space - granted you will be taking your quilt on and off the frame a lot more - so you quilt an area that fits comfortably in the quilting space you have.. leaving about 2-3" inches then put your next top piece where it needs to go - sew that seam on your home machine... then do the same with your next backing piece then zig zag your batting on it then back on to the frame...

    I have a frame and am hoping to get an 18" machine next week if all goes well. We shall see what happens. I am hoping that all will work well and I actually get my machine. I'm very excited at the prospect of getting it! But I am not going to count my chickens yet or let myself get too excited just yet ya know??

    Anyhoo... I'll have an extra frame here in about a week that I am going to sell at a huge discount. I'll be putting it up on Craigslist. The machine I am getting has a frame already. I'm going to try it out on both frames - the Viking Inspira frame as well as my SuperQuilter ProFlex frame (which I do love - it is wonderful!)

    Eventually you will either get your grove and work around the 9" throat with an idea like I suggested (that's how my mom quilts as you go - it's a really interesting method. I'm planning on posting up a tutorial on it with pictures and all online soon - minus the quilting frame since that's the way she taught me but it's adaptable to the frame!) It's hard to envision until you actually just do it. I'll work on that tutorial this next week. I keep meaning to and forget!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.