Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums > Main
Machine quilting with a frame/without a frame?? >

Machine quilting with a frame/without a frame??

Machine quilting with a frame/without a frame??

Old 04-06-2010, 05:47 AM
  #1  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
deedles215's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Elk River, MN
Posts: 212
Default

I looked through previous posts about machine quilting and I didn't see the answer I'm curious about...

I am a new quilter, but I'm starting to fly through my quilt tops (it's no wonder so many people have UFOs, lol!!!), but I'm super nervous about machine quilting.
I machine quilted my first quilt, SITD style- and it was TERRIBLE. I never want to see that quilt again- ever.

I really want to learn FMQ but I don't have the set-up for it just quite yet. I'm not confident enough to try it on my machine as is- muscling the first quilt around was hard enough as it was.
I have an old Montgomery Ward work-horse of a machine- I love it! It's not fancy, it's old; but man that machine runs and works like a charm- for me, for now.
My sister and I have considered going in on a quilting frame/frame and machine together. I have seen both on Craigslist in my area. At this point I can't afford a new one.

Okay, knowing all of that:
1. Can I buy a quilting frame without a machine?
2. Can I use it with my machine? Do I need a special machine for it?
3. How does it work- does it have to be set up all the time?
4. Anything else I should know- in general- about quilting frames? Obviously there's many brands/types... but..?? I'm just totally clueless.

Any advice/suggestions would be greatly appreciated! You guys have never let me down in the past... :D

Thanks!
deedles215 is offline  
Old 04-06-2010, 06:05 AM
  #2  
Pam
Super Member
 
Pam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 3,672
Default

Yes, you can find oodles of frames for sale that will work with the machine you have now. If you get quilting magazines, they all advertize in those. I just got a short arm quilting machine and frame, have it set up, but have not used it yet. I am kind of chicken, don't know why.
Pam is offline  
Old 04-06-2010, 07:16 AM
  #3  
Super Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Silicon Valley in CA
Posts: 1,847
Default

I'm sure you can find a frame to use with your machine. However, you will not have much quilting space & the more you roll the quilt the less space you have to quilt in. Once you set the frame up, you will want to leave it up. It is a lot of work to get it set up & you don't want to spend your quilting time setting up your frame each time. Just like FMQ on a home machine takes practice, using a frame will take a lot of practice also.
Jannie is offline  
Old 04-06-2010, 08:02 AM
  #4  
Super Member
 
Ditter43's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Crystal River Florida
Posts: 9,785
Default

Get an old mattress pad and practice to your hearts content!!I don't know how you sandwiched your quilt, but if you use the 505 quilt basting spray, it will make the quilting process so much easier. I have a frame and machine I haven't used yet too. There is a learning curve with it so I will have to spend a lot of hours with the setup before I attempt using a real quilt on it.... There is no easy way out :lol: It will take a lot of practice either way!

Ditter
Ditter43 is offline  
Old 04-06-2010, 08:04 AM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 364
Default

I have a Brother 15oo with a proflex frame. So I guess you could classify it as a "mid arm" No more wrestling with the weight of the Quilt.I have also seen this frame set up with a Juki.


You do need some room. I have mine set up at 10ft. Some people disassemble...I am too lazy for that.

I want to upgrade my machine so, I can have more quilt area. Overall I am happy with my purchase. Practice is required fo sure.
Elly is offline  
Old 04-06-2010, 08:08 AM
  #6  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: North Carolina - But otherwise, NOTW
Posts: 7,940
Default

I have a BabyLock Quilters Pro machine on a NewJoy frame. It is a short arm setup. I am happy with it, because I don't do really fancy quilting. I just do meandering -- enough to hold the quilt together. I bought it used for $2,500, and I have not regretted it one minute.
jljack is offline  
Old 04-06-2010, 08:08 AM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 364
Default

OOps More
The reason I chose the proflex is because, it can grow with you.
Elly is offline  
Old 04-06-2010, 08:16 AM
  #8  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
deedles215's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Elk River, MN
Posts: 212
Default

Originally Posted by Ditter43
Get an old mattress pad and practice to your hearts content!!I don't know how you sandwiched your quilt, but if you use the 505 quilt basting spray, it will make the quilting process so much easier. I have a frame and machine I haven't used yet too. There is a learning curve with it so I will have to spend a lot of hours with the setup before I attempt using a real quilt on it.... There is no easy way out :lol: It will take a lot of practice either way!

Ditter
I have practiced... I just don't want to get frustrated and tire my arms out on something so big that isn't even my quilt... lol! It's the muscling that I can't handle- moving the quilt around so much and rolling and unrolling, and balancing over my shoulder and moving around and then balancing the weight of it on the table, and holding in place... and just when I get on a roll and everything is in the right place? ...my bobbin runs out of thread. Or my cat flops over on my foot, over the pedal, and I sew a crazy line (not so different from my SITDing...hahahah!!) and have to take the whole thing out and rip stitches, re-roll, etc etc etc... and then I start swearing and wish I'd never started G D quilting in the first place, and take a walk to relax and then don't want to start again... lol! Anyone with me?!

As far as the sandwiching- I pinned, every 3 inches, just to be sure. I will try the basting spray, just don't know how to keep the spray from going all over the place..??
deedles215 is offline  
Old 04-06-2010, 08:26 AM
  #9  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Western Wisconsin
Posts: 12,930
Default

Originally Posted by deedles215
I have practiced... I just don't want to get frustrated and tire my arms out on something so big that isn't even my quilt... lol! It's the muscling that I can't handle- moving the quilt around so much and rolling and unrolling, and balancing over my shoulder and moving around and then balancing the weight of it on the table, and holding in place... and just when I get on a roll and everything is in the right place? ...my bobbin runs out of thread. Or my cat flops over on my foot, over the pedal, and I sew a crazy line (not so different from my SITDing...hahahah!!) and have to take the whole thing out and rip stitches, re-roll, etc etc etc... and then I start swearing and wish I'd never started G D quilting in the first place, and take a walk to relax and then don't want to start again... lol! Anyone with me?!

As far as the sandwiching- I pinned, every 3 inches, just to be sure. I will try the basting spray, just don't know how to keep the spray from going all over the place..??
In my opinion, SITD is the hardest way to machine quilt. I don't do it any more.

You don't have to muscle a big quilt if you cut the batting into three sections. Marti Mitchell (I think) has a book out on how to do this now, although I first saw this method described in one of Debra Wagner's books. This is not the same as quilt-as-you-go; it is indistinguishable from quilts that have been quilted in one piece. A search on this board should show up some threads about it. If I can find an old post I made on the technique, I will link it for you. Basically you layer the quilt as usual, but then wavy-cut the batting alone into three sections and quilt just the middle of the quilt first. This makes for much less bulk under the arm of the machine.

As for spray basting, find a large flat sheet and spread that out on the floor before creating your quilt sandwich. The sheet will catch any overspray, and you can toss it in the laundry afterwards (because spray basting glue is water soluble and will wash out of the sheet). Also, aim your spray from the edge of the quilt towards the center to minimize overspray.

Instead of FMQ, try using a walking foot and doing wavy lines with it. This is much more free-form than trying to make straight lines or SITD.

Edit: OK, I found this old thread where I describe quilting in sections. Here it is:
http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-19096-1.htm
Prism99 is offline  
Old 04-06-2010, 10:30 AM
  #10  
Junior Member
 
kbiederman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Stacy, Minnesota
Posts: 227
Default

I am with my sister on this one, when it comes to the quilting, I just want to quit and start a new one :)
kbiederman is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
JNCT14
Main
29
10-25-2014 04:34 PM
Krystyna
General Chit-Chat (non-quilting talk)
77
07-26-2011 11:25 AM
MostlyMaja
Main
13
03-07-2011 06:04 AM
cuppi duke
Main
15
12-18-2010 10:10 AM
julie
Main
21
09-21-2009 10:55 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


FREE Quilting Newsletter


SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.