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Thread: quilting machines

  1. #26
    Super Member Sheree from Chicago's Avatar
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    Good Morning!
    A friend of mine has a Statler long arm quilting machine. It is a wonderful machine. It is computerized and programable, hundreds of patterns to choose from, or she can free motion. However, long arm quilting is her business. And she does have quite a business, always 50-75 quilts to be quilted. The down side is that it takes up her whole dining room (so much for Thanksgiving dinner). And the price is about $35,000!
    How exciting to be in the market for a new machine! I would appreciate a dealer helping you make the right decision and not trying to sell you the moon.
    Have fun. Let us know what you end up picking, Sheree from Chicago



  2. #27
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    I am looking at the Bailey machines. The problem with those is I live in Ilinois and I wouldn't be able to try one out. Not sure if I like that. But I like the price of them! Does anyone know what all you can do with them? I saw a video but it wasn't that great. The Babylock Jewel was great and you could follow a pattern. Does the Bailey allow you to do that?

  3. #28
    Super Member ruthie's Avatar
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    Hi everyone,
    My DH made me a metal frame for my machine. It's 13 feet long. He gave up his metal shop for me to have a studio and it's in it's' own little building. I only have a singer 201 right now but am planning on purchasing a longarm as soon as I can find one in my price range.
    I also leave a little at the sides to change bobbins. As for cutting threads, I saw this once on a video (can't remember where). After you are finished sewing put the needle down and then back up, move the machine away from the spot and catch the thread with your fingers. Hold the thread and put the needle back down in the same spot then up again all the while holding the thread pulled up when you first moved the machine. Put a little upward pressure on this thread when you move the machine away again and the bobbin thread will come up through the quilt and you can cut it off whatever length you want.
    It's so much easier than fumbling under the quilt for the bobbin thread.

  4. #29
    Super Member azam's Avatar
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    Hi fish92241,
    Try rolling your quilt with the needle down where you have to stop. Once you roll your quilt resume quilting. This usually works for me 8)

  5. #30
    Super Member omak's Avatar
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    I want in on the discussion ... not because I have anything to add, per se, but I want to read what all of you are saying!
    We got the Pinnacle, and it is set up full length (didn't want to lose any of the parts) .... as it stands right now, of course it will have trouble going around a corner ... HOWEVER! When it came by Fed Ex, it was in a box that wasn't more than maybe fourteen inches deep, and a little wider, by about five feet long ... an appliance dolly took it wherever I wanted it to be. Should I ever decide to move the frame, I know we can disassemble and re-assemble anywhere else we want. The instructions are in the file cabinet ... if a man puts it together, a man can take it apart ... or a woman, as the case may be - - it is that inanimate, human superiority thing I live by .
    Sorry that you didn't have a helpful salesman ... but, on the bright side it is one less store you have to spend money in, and more $$ for somewhere else in your county, eh?

  6. #31
    Senior Member
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    Thanks for the rollup tip. I will try it on my next quilt. The quilt is now on the bed and everyone is saying it is beautiful. The imperfections are known only to me! The machine makes lovely flowers and leaves in each square and I am pleased with that. I also have the laser and have the Quilt Cad program which I haven't even opened.
    The final count of boxes that came with my Gracie quilt frame was five, I think. Pretty overwhelming--but worth it now. The quilting really didn't take long at all with the three layers on rollers--no more pinning!! It makes our whole bedroom look great. I will send a picture as soon as I figure out how to do that.

  7. #32
    Super Member omak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandpat

    I guess its what you are used to. I'm sure that if I tried one of the larger machines, I would never do one on my regular little machine again! I know that I would LOVE to have a mid-arm at least some day, but for now...I'll just bookmark this thread for my beginning research.
    I have the big quilt frame and the babylock machine, but that machine is only for the frame. Since my frame is in the big house, and I spend a lot of time in the bunkhouse, sometimes, it is just easier to use another machine and free motion something, especially if it is a baby quilt or wallhanging ... it is nice to have the option of either.

  8. #33
    Senior Member sgardner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by k_jupiter
    I relate my experiences, you either take those observations or you ignore them.
    tim in san jose
    Just adding to this discussion- I didn't think Tim was picking on anyone, maybe because I have had the similiar "grueling" experience of trying to quilt without proper equipment and support. I learned to have my kids be right near me to help hold up the quilt and move the weight around as it goes through the machine as I guided it. Still, I always felt like I was "shoving" or "dragging" the quilt to get it to move right. When I did it all by myself on a larger quilt, it was exhausting and my arms and back felt tired by the end of the quilt. Even trying to do it on a big table didn't reduce the drag when I had to move a large section of the quilt. Maybe that's because of the tight space of the arm of my machine, the lack of any "slick surface" applied to the machine to reduce drag, etc., the mechanics of my really old machine, the wrong height of the table, etc. And, I tend to quilt only in straight lines, and not the stimpling or fancy curves that would just add to the amount of "shoving around" that you would have to do for something fancier. There are just too many variables in everyone's experience to say that Tim was trying to pick on any one person.
    I can't find justification to refute his experience in any way.

    Secondly, isn't the experience of quilting with poor equipment the whole reason for seeking a special machine and frame to support the quilt to get better results? Rather than holding up the quilt and shoving it through by sheer force of human effort, you get a frame that holds up the weight of the quilt, and holds up the quilting machine in a fashion that allows you to simply push it around to get the shape of the stitching you want. This whole thread is about which of the equipment that you can buy to do that does a better job, and I thank everyone who stuck to the thread's intent of discussing all those machines and what they like about them.

    I too am considering machines and frames for quilting- thank you to everyone who contributed which set ups they had. Maybe the discussion of how to do a quilting business should be it's own thread, since many of you own these machines for your own pleasure (which I see nothing wrong with).

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