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Thread: Quilting Queston

  1. #1

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    I have been working on a round bargello quilt since last March. I used a template and borders to make it queen + bed size. I moved the furniture and laid it out on my living room floor layering it into the quilt sandwich yesterday. I used tons of quliters safety pins to put it together. My thought is to hand quilt the round center....and machine quilt the rest. Has anyone done this and do you have any tips?

    I'm still very new to quilting and this was a overly ambitious project..although I've learned a lot from it. I don't want to end up with wrinkles on the back . Any thoughts, suggestions, etc. would be appreciated.

    Happy New Year to you all.

  2. #2
    Super Member nanabirdmo's Avatar
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    brenda,
    i would sure love to see a picture of your quilt. sounds amazing.
    i am not the best one to give quilting advice but when you were describing how you want to quilt it i was picturing the process. seems like you might want to check the back fairly often and plan to repin as needed to avoid wrinkles.
    others are much more experienced with the quilting part than i. i'm sure you will get some good advice here.

  3. #3
    Super Member Moonpi's Avatar
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    Combining hand and machine quilting? Sure, I do it all the time. Boring, straight ditch stitching gets machined, and then I get to the fun stuff once the quilt is stable. I'm sure there are some who would do it opposite. Whatever works!

    Sounds pretty!

  4. #4
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    Sure! Just try to keep the overall density that same - if you quilt closely in one area, do the same over the rest of it. Quilting causes a quilt to shrink up - the more you quilt, the more it puckers. This is not a problem unless you quilt heavily in one area and not so much in another.

  5. #5

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    Thanks for the advice. Now that I'm this far, I'm "waiting for inspiration" on how I want/need to hand quilt the round center. My husband has offered to build a frame for my quilt hoop to make it a little easier to handle....this thing is big.

    I'm wondering if I should try to baste it with stitches so that it is more stable when I move the pins around???? I really am a newby........

    I'll try to post a picture in the near future. (I don't know how to do it so will have to go back in the archives to get directions.)


  6. #6

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    Thanks.... It was a pretty crazy thing for a brand new quilter to start...I had no idea what I was getting into. I'm really proud of the way it looks. I will do my best to figure out how to post a picture.

  7. #7
    Senior Member annmarie's Avatar
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    Actually, we'd like to see a picture now AND when it is quilted :D :D :D

  8. #8
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
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    A round bargello? I'm drooling! I've done several bargellos but haven't tried a round one before.

    I mix hand and machine quilting all the time. However, I think before I would ever consider hand quilting a bargello, it would first have to be a quilt I plan to keep as an heirloom quilt. If you are like me and your pieces are all between a quarter inch and two and a half inches, I would suggest you machine quilt it and save yourself a lot of frustration and sore fingers. If you have make a bargello with the larger pieces, you may have more seams than a normal quilt but it should still be possible to hand quilt it. That said, my best advice is to go with what you will be happy with.

    I'm with the other ladies. I can't wait to see a picture!!
    ~Tiffany

  9. #9
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    Just a thought here, but if you are going to hand quilt, I think I would save myself the weight of the safety pins and thread baste. If you are using a lap hoop and the quilt is really big, those pins add a lot of weight.

    If you are new to hand quilting, make sure your quilt isn't tight as a drum in your hoop. You need enough give so that you can rock your needle without breaking or bending it. I usually push the center down with my hand before the outer hoop goes on to make sure that its flexible.

    I taught myself to hand quilt and that was one tip I wish someone gave me right off. I bent and broke so many needles that it wasn't funny.

    Good luck, Helen

  10. #10
    Super Member Moonpi's Avatar
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    I'm with thread basting, too - when using a frame, safety pins seem to get in the way.

  11. #11
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
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    I hate basting. I think that is the one part of quilting that just bogs me down. I'm good with making the top, with quilting, and even love doing bindings, but sandwhiching and basting - blech! One thing I will do occasionally is use the water soluble thread to thread baste. It's wonderful in that you don't have to worry about removing it as you are quilting since it disappears when you block your quilt after the quilting process. It is a tad pricey, which is why I don't do it with all my projects. Still, it is very helpful, especially if you are working on a deadline and need to finish up quick.
    ~Tiffany

  12. #12
    Super Member MissTreated's Avatar
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    Have you tried the spray basting? I bought a can of it to try, but as yet haven't tried it. I know one quilter who uses it and swears by it.

    M

  13. #13
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    i use spray basting on practically everything. i sometimes add a bit of pin basting to that, but i probably don't need to.

    i'm with tiffany. i have tops that have been done for more than a year but are gathering dust because i can only motivate myself once in a while to do the sandwich/baste part. when i'm in the mood, it do everything that's been waiting before i lose the urge again. LOL

  14. #14

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    Yes, I tried the spray basting on a smaller quilt and it worked well....I did it in the clubhouse in our community rec room. The next time I used it I used it in my living room. I had sticky spray residue everywhere...on the kitchen floor, the blinds, cabinets, etc. I'm not anxious to repeat the clean-up.

    Since we live in FL in the winter, I actually thought about scrubbing the patio and trying to lay it out, out there. Then I decided that would not be real comfortable crawling around on the cement....with age comes wisdom...sometimes. :lol:

  15. #15

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    I'm new at everything quilting but do truly enjoy handquilting. Thanks for the tips.

    I think I will try some thread basting to stablize it ...you are right this thing weighs a ton. I must have hundreds of pins in it.

  16. #16

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    You are right about the handquilting...it will be a challenge because of the small pieces..... BUT this one is going to be mine and hopefully a family heirloom after I'm gone. I am not in a rush ...it will be my reward to work on it after I get other things accomplished. My kitty Annie is very excited about "helping" me with it.

    I'll work on figuring out how to post a picture. You all are so helpful and are getting me really motivated.

    THANKS A BUNCH!!!!!

  17. #17
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
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    Hi M. Yes, I do spray baste. I find it is wonderful for smaller projects but takes a bit of work with the larger king-sized quilts. I do find that my fabric, especially from the back, will shift on me if the piece is too large and I am hand quilting. I ususally spray baste and then add some pins to make sure nothing shifts when I'm machine quilting. For the larger hand quilted tops I put them off until assailed by guilt (or I need to get it finished for a deadline) and then I hand baste it.
    ~Tiffany

  18. #18
    Super Member moreland's Avatar
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    I am an avid quilt spray user. I like using cheap flannel backed tablecloths as my "drop cloth". When they get too sticky I toss and get a new one--often find them for a dollar or two. Just have the tablecloth a few inches larger than the piece you are working on. The other thing I've learned with practice is that it does not take as much spray as one might think. I spray lightly and if it needs another squirt to stick well, then just do the small area that didn't stick as well as I wanted it to.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brenda Retzlaff
    Yes, I tried the spray basting on a smaller quilt and it worked well....I did it in the clubhouse in our community rec room. The next time I used it I used it in my living room. I had sticky spray residue everywhere...on the kitchen floor, the blinds, cabinets, etc. I'm not anxious to repeat the clean-up.

    Since we live in FL in the winter, I actually thought about scrubbing the patio and trying to lay it out, out there. Then I decided that would not be real comfortable crawling around on the cement....with age comes wisdom...sometimes. :lol:

  19. #19
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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    Hand quilting with sewn basting goes alot smoother for me. When it's pin basted you have to be so careful placing the hoop that you don't stretch or rip the fabric where the pins are. Moving the pins as you quilt might shift the quilt sandwich enough to get wrinkles in the backing wouldn't it?

  20. #20
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
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    I lap quilt and don't use a hoop so the pins aren't such an issue for me. I know when I have used a frame the pins are a problem and that's when thread basting is important. It is still my least favorite part of the entire quilting process! :P
    ~Tiffany

  21. #21

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    Brenda's Round Bargell Quilt - queen+ size

  22. #22

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    Here is a picture of my Round Bargello Quilt...with pins in all their glory.

    The border doesn't show up very well but is like an ice cream cone shape with the center colors in random order.

    I haven't started the thread basting yet.



    Brenda's Round Bargell Quilt
    Name:  Attachment-1437.jpe
Views: 78
Size:  43.2 KB

  23. #23
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
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    Wow! Brenda that is spectacular! I have made a few bargellos and am ready to branch out into the more difficult and unusual ones. Where did you get the pattern for your quilt? I agree with Loretta, I can't stop looking at it. And your borders showed up well enough for me to drool over the picture. :lol:
    ~Tiffany

  24. #24

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    Thanks, it was worth all the work & rework and a few tears of frustration along the way.

    The pattern is in Quilts Without Corners by Cheryl Phillips. It has a number of lovely and unique round quilt patterns in it. I purchased a 9 degree wedge ruler that I found it on the internet at a reasonable price.

  25. #25

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    Thanks for the compliments. It's faaaaaar from perfect but I'm learning that it doesn't have to be.

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