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Thread: Quilting in Sections

  1. #26
    Super Member ceannastahr's Avatar
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    Norma .
    Was reading what you said about the books I think I'll check them out also.

    Also saw what you said about the long arm machine. I got my Juki TL98QE a lot sooner than I though.
    Every time I bought something at the store I would break a bill, at the end of the day I dumped all the change in a jar. You'd be suprised how fast it adds up.

    I love my machine stll getting use to it but love it.

  2. #27
    Super Member Knot Sew's Avatar
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    I think I will head for the local library, some of the books mentioned are available. We have a feature that allows you to check availably and have them ready when you get there.
    I want to start a new project and thinking of a sunbonnet sue, any words of wisdom; machine stiching or hand?

  3. #28

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    Hi Ruthie,

    Quilt in a Day's Eleanor Burns has a wonderful book (if you don't have it already!) on making a Sunbonnet Sue and Overalls Sam quilt. You can find it on the QIAD website. She also has lots of tools and notions, books, etc. for sale that are great and less than lots of stores I have visited.

    Let me know how your quilt turns out. I have been thinking of trying one out, also. I'm taking a class in beginning applique in March, so maybe that's where I'll go to make my next quilt!

    What a wonderful idea for saving for a long-arm. I'll have to find a pretty big jug!! What kind do you have?

    Happy Quilting to you, too!

    Norma

  4. #29
    Super Member ceannastahr's Avatar
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    I used a big pickle jar . when it got half full I started rolling. Could't belive how much chage you have in a month. Remember you never spend the change always break a bill, Even if you only spending 25 cents.

  5. #30

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    Hi Norma,
    Iam new here and read this article, I would be very interested in the title of these books and the authors names, I am diabled and this sounds like the quiting way for me.
    Thank you for telling us about it.
    Fondly, Gloria

    PS... I found page two :D and see you've already posted what I needed and more..thank you I'm off to check them out..

  6. #31

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    hi, A wonam named Geirgia Bonesteel started doing 'quilting on the go" back in the late 70's. She did hand work and did a block at a time style. Cotten just took it one step further. I think they are OK for laps or utility but do not care for them as a craft or art quilt. To each his own, one of the things I like best about quilting is there ae no rules.lol.

  7. #32

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    Hi Ceanna,

    Right you are, just happen to have one of those big jars from Costco!!

    What kind of long-arm did you buy? I've looked at several on internet but would like to hear from you or anyone else as to their likes or dislikes of their long-arms.

    I considered getting one of the racks that you can use your own machine with and saleslady at Viking told me unless your machine has a really big "throat", it's almost impossible to get the whole quilt inside it, unless it's a baby or lap quilt.

    Talk to you later and thanks for any input.

    Norma

  8. #33

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    Hi Gloria,

    If I can help you with anything or suggestions, just let me know. We're all in this together!! I may not have all the answers...that's why this is such a great chat line, because somebody out there surely will!

    Hang in there and keep on quilting!!

    Norma

  9. #34

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    Hi Norma , I've been doing some quilting in sections for the past year and having great success with it. One pattern that works particularly well is "Trip Around the World" ,Its done in quarters and is just like doing a baby quilt.I find it much easier to handle the smaller pieces.

  10. #35

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    Hi Wilma,

    Thanks for your suggestions and input. Will give it a try, for sure now.

    Norma

  11. #36

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    I read your message about quilting as you go. I have just begun to start quilting. I am trying to learn how to do this type of quilting. I think I have it figured out. However,I may find I don't once I start!
    My mother hand embroidered butterflies on 20 muslin squares. the squares are probably 9x9 inch. I want to make a quilt out of these squares. I want to make this a "quilt as you go quilt"..I also want to do it on the sewing machine..
    As I said, quilting is new to me. Do you have any suggestions for making a quilt top by machine out of them. I would like to know the best and lighest weight batting to use. I will appreciate any information you can give me. ..Thanks, Addlee

  12. #37
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    Thanks for the link! My sister and I tried to do this using Betty Cotton's technique, but found it confusing. Maybe this will be an easier technique to try, at least for starters.

  13. #38

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    Hi Addlee,

    Thanks for your messsage. Your squares should make a beautiful quilt. Just be sure you soak and rinse lightly your squares before quilting and making your "sandwich" (quilt top, batting and backing). Muslim will shrink, unless your mom washed the muslim before she used it to embroidery on.

    Amazon.com has several books out on quilting in sections and I think I mentioned them in a message to Becky on Page 3, of this particular subject. There are lots of ladies that have written books on this way of quilting and I, too, am going to try it. Local quilt shop is even going to have a class on it so will try that first. Don't know where you live but if you have a quilt shop you go to you might ask if they have a class in this. I think other folks in this column have mentioned Betty Cotton, who sounds like she is very good, too. You can get her books on Amazon.com, too.

    As for batting, a friend recommended using Warm and Natural, 100% cotton for 4 lap quilts I am making that I want to be light and yet comfortably warm. It seems to be just perfect on the ones I have finished so far. Just remember, if you want an antique look (crinkly) to your finished quilt, don't soak and dry your batting beforehand. If you want your finished quilt to look smooth after you finish, then pre-soak and lightly spin dry and dry on low heat. Smooth out and fold before using the batting .

    Hobb's makes a wonderful batting that is 80% cotton and 20% polyester that is really nice, too, for regular sized quilts or ones that you want a little thicker. Washing before or after quilting is the same results with Hobb's. My personal favorite for all around is the Hobb's 80-20. Think I will stick with it from now on.

    If you're looking for a marvelous, all-around excellent quilting booking that covers everything from A-Z about quilting, Better Homes and Gardens has a wonderful big, thick book that is easy to read and understand. Better than Quilting for Dummies!! I got mine at BooksaMillion but you can get a lot cheaper at Amazon.com under the new and used books.

    Hope I was able to help you out a little. I'm no expert but have had some wonderful teachers, so glad to pass on any of the "good stuff" I have learned.

    Good luck, Addlee! Norma

  14. #39

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    Would love to know the namesof those books also ,and where they can be purchased Thanks Wilma p.s I have one called " Machine Quilting in Sections" by Marti Mitchell

  15. #40

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    Hi - I have been thinking about quilting in sections, but cannot figure out how to sew the back together. Do you do it by hand? I am trying to learn how to machine quilt on my standard sewing machine and think that quilt sections would be much easier to learn on than trying a hugh quilt. Good luck - Marylou

  16. #41

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    Marylou
    I could sit and explain, but I would take up alot of this space, There are several books listed, under this topic if you'll scroll back to pages 1 and 2. They explain the best way, One of the authors is Cotton and she has a techniqe that can explain it. Please check out the books, also see if any of the books listed are at your local Library,
    Happy Quilting

  17. #42

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    Becky - thanks for your suggestion - I plan to head to the library as soon as the weather gets out of the single digets. Marylou

  18. #43
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    Several different methods were demonstrated on a Simply Quilts episode

    http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/cr_quilting/article/0,1789,HGTV_3298_1507325,00.html

    There are probably a bazillion more methods in use out there. I use a few different variations of the SQ demonstrations. The method I choose depends on whether or not there will be sashing between the blocks, whether or not I want sashing to cover the seams on the back, finished size, type of batting I plan to use, etc, etc, etc.

    I never hand-stitch any of the closing seams. Waaaaay too much like work. Why stitch by hand when you can use an embellishing machine stitch? Faster and fancier - like you "planned" it that way. LOL

  19. #44
    rosyramon's Avatar
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    I'd be interested in trying that technique. What books did you buy?

  20. #45
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    Kim
    Betty Cotton uses the 80- 20 batting because the 20% poly helps keep the top and bottom pieces sandwiched together when ironed before stitching them. Makes it easier to handle when working with the top, batting and the bottom pieces all at one time. The iron melts the poly just enough to keep them together while they are being handled. It looks good when finished. Her book is really good with the directions too. Hope this helps explain why she uses that batting. I've done a few of her projects in her book and also took her class at Sewing with Nancy. Lot's of fun.

    Suzy

  21. #46

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    I am new but I like this way of quilding I like to quild blocks one at time with a difrent back on each them when I put them to gether it has a peaced back I have all ways hand quilted I am learning to do them on machen Neva from Oklahoma

  22. #47

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    I am new here I read and you name is Addlee that is my middle nane a small world NEVA

  23. #48
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    Hi Norma, I would love to have the names of the books. I really enjoy hand sewing and if I could do my quilting in this manner I thinks it would be a real bonus for me. Thanks a lot. Judith

  24. #49

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    Norma

  25. #50

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    I don't know if she "invented it", but I remember seeing Georgia Bonesteel on TV and her books on lap quilting. Here is the part of her site which has all her books for sale http://www.georgiabonesteel.com/store.html I did a small lap quilt a long time ago and was easy to do and the results were good, although I still prefer "regular" quilts. The lap quilting was neat because you could take it anywhere and be able to quilt.
    Chris

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