Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 30

Thread: Quilting Studio

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    BC Canada
    Posts
    21

    Smile Quilting Studio

    After many years of moving around the house, my DH has decided to build me a studio for quilting in the garden. I would appreciate any ideas as to size and suggestions of what to include. For those of you who have a studio what do you like most about it and what do you wish you had included? I am only a hobby quilter and enjoy other crafts too!
    Many thanks in advance for your help...it's wonderful to be able to ask the world for help!!

  2. #2
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    29,887
    I would like a room big enough to fit a long arm machine! If I had that I would need room to store a full roll of batting, shelves with doors to contain my stash (doors to prevent fading) and a nice window to look out of by my sewing machine. A sink with running water would be nice close to my ironing station. Lots of good lighting and computer hook up. Okay, add a comfy day bed, fridge and bathroom and I might never leave.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    65
    Oh Tartan that sounds like paradise!!! Gabriola how exciting for you. I would love to give you suggestions but I am still moving my "hobby" around the house trying to find the right place... All I can suggest after building home and barns, go bigger than you think because you'll always regret it!!!

  4. #4
    Junior Member sandyquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    248
    Congrats. OK you can never have enough electrical outlets .... give your iron a dedicated outlet. Ceiling fan or fans. TV with cable. Cutting table + extra large cutting matt with storage underneath. Peg board in the stash closet to hold rulers, bags and etc. A design wall. Extra large sewing table and install the machine onto a shelf so the machine bed and table are level. A secretarial type chair for sewing so you can adjust it. Rolling bins or something similar to store your threads and other items to prevent them from getting dusty. AND one of those large ironing board surfaces with storage underneath.
    Last edited by sandyquilts; 07-18-2013 at 09:27 AM.
    Sandy
    http://sandyquilts.blogspot.com

  5. #5
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Corpus Christi, Tx.
    Posts
    15,886
    Blog Entries
    3
    I would set mine up like a big kitchen with an island(cutting table) that has electrical outlets. One counter area that is designated to other crafts. The dining area (for the longarm). A little nook with a side table to sit down and relax. One end of the counter area could be for a microwave, small sink and fridge, like they used to have for efficiency apartments. The cupboards area could keep the supplies needed for those certain designated areas. Maybe have a nice little deck or porch to be able to step outside. And yes windows to let the light in and the sometimes gentle breezes. Everyone knows that even on a rainy day if the windows are open it brightens the day. Floors of tile with a semigloss shine that always look clean if all you have time is a lick and a promise with a Swiffer. A design closet that serves a multi-purpose that can display multiple designs on the inside of the doors and those racks that swing out hold multiples. Then at the end of the day if you "need" to run an errand/s you can shut the doors. The library end would be next to the area reading nook and would consist of books and dvds, or cds and your computer.

  6. #6
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,197
    If I could custom build my own work room, I would put kitchen cabinets (both lower and upper) on 2 walls of the room. The countertops would be your work surfaces and the drawers and cabinets would hold your various supplies. Have kneeholes built in so that you have somewhere to sit and work. If you have any hobbies that require a cooktop (I make baskets and dye my reeds), have one installed, too. On the third wall, I would have my cutting surface and large ironing surface, with shelves for bins, etc. to hold rulers, cutters, irons, etc. On the fourth wall, I would have a wall-to-wall bookcase with a build in computer station to hold all the books I have. The bookcase would have doors that were a design wall and a pegboard. I would have three sewing centers facing each other, one with my sewing machne, one with my serger and one with my Sunshine 16 (a sit-down mid-arm machine for FMQ).

    As you can tell, I have thought about this. I always said that if I could build my own house, I'd start with a plan for a duplex. The first kitchen / dining area / living room would be used for those purposes. The second kitchen / dining area / living room would become my sewing / craft area. I would have a stove and refrigerator and as many cabinets as I could fit into them, plus a table and chairs for friends to come and sit and sew. The dining area would have the built-in bookcases plus a small sitting area with good lighting and a comfy chair for my hand work -- applique, hand piecing and hand quilting. The family room would have the cutting, ironing and sewing stations. The layout would include 4 bedrooms, but the master bedroom / bath would actually take up 2 bedrooms, so that we could have a sitting area in the master. The third bedroom would become my husband's music room and the 4th bedroom would be the exercise room. All the rooms would have cable TV hookups.
    Last edited by mckwilter; 07-18-2013 at 10:02 AM.

  7. #7
    Super Member petthefabric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Eastern Madera County, Ca
    Posts
    1,043
    So good to dream.

    I kinda like that duplex idea.

  8. #8
    Super Member grammysharon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Monmouth, Oregon
    Posts
    5,841
    Blog Entries
    1
    I want your studio dream!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    I would like a room big enough to fit a long arm machine! If I had that I would need room to store a full roll of batting, shelves with doors to contain my stash (doors to prevent fading) and a nice window to look out of by my sewing machine. A sink with running water would be nice close to my ironing station. Lots of good lighting and computer hook up. Okay, add a comfy day bed, fridge and bathroom and I might never leave.
    A quilt is a blanket of love. Sharon

  9. #9
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    9,683
    Blog Entries
    31
    Have the electric outlets raised so you don't have to bend over to use them also having enough of them and a power surge protector right on the electrical box coming into the building for sure fire protection from surges.

    In my wildest dreams I always wanted a screen porch to do my sewing in when the weather is nice.

    I would not have a lot of drawers because stuff just gets lost or forgotten in them. I like to have my tools in sight just like a garage or carpenters work area. Tools go back to the same spot every time I'm done using them.

    Don't forget space for incidentals like a coffee maker, small fridge, copier and stuff like that.

    Have fun through the process and keep posting.
    peace
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

  10. #10
    Super Member sewbeadit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    3,999
    Build it as big as you can afford and afford to keep up, you will never regret it.
    Sewbeadit
    W. Washington

  11. #11
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    28,610
    I doubt I would ever use a sewing room that wasn't attached to my house. I have read lots of people have their rooms unattached. I hope it will be all you want it to be.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Grand Bay, AL
    Posts
    15
    Having recently repurposed an outbuilding into a sewing room I would second what someone already suggested about having the outlets placed higher on the walls. So nice to not have to crawl under the table to access the outlet!

  13. #13
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    18,361
    I agree as large as you can afford, I love mine!!!!

  14. #14
    Super Member nhweaver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Delmarva Peninsula
    Posts
    1,167
    Blog Entries
    1
    Congratulations! A newly built craft studio to be. Give your DH a hug from me.

    I would have lots of natural light, maybe a sliding door to step into your garden when the weather is nice, and closets with lots of shelves to keep my fabric, etc. out of the light. I just turned a bedroom into a quilting studio, and would love to have more closet storage, I have lots of natural light. I enjoy my room totally. if you have room, include a comfy recliner with a good reading light, and maybe a tv or built in speakers if you listen to music.
    If life gives you lemons, make a margarita.

  15. #15
    Super Member hopetoquilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,873
    Recessed outlets are awesome so location of outlets does not limit furniture positioning (you could push a bookcase against outlet and still plug things in)

  16. #16
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Northern Indiana
    Posts
    1,770
    Blog Entries
    14
    All great ideas. The main thing is to go as big as you can, 'cause stuff allways expands to meet the exsisting space

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Normal, IL
    Posts
    561
    Don't forget the heating and air conditioning.

  18. #18
    Super Member sparkys_mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    2,367
    There is a terrific book by Lois Hallock "Creating Your Perfect Quilting Space" that might be helpful. Of course looking at all the wonderful examples here on the board would be helpful, too. My room is 12x14 and I would love it to be at least twice as big.
    Lots of natural light. PLENTY of wall space (you can never have too much design wall space!). As many electrical outlets as you can get and do not let them put them down at the baseboards - who wants to be crawling around on the floor all the time to plug stuff in. If you have a modern sewing machine (lots of computer boards) be sure to have a dedicated circuit for that so you don't run the risk of blowing a fuse or having a brown out on your machine.
    Other things --- ceiling fans for summer --- radiant heat for those cold winter floors.
    Yummm! Have fun and enjoy.
    Pat

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Thornton, Colorado
    Posts
    948
    I used Lois Hallock's book mentioned in the post above as a guide when DH and his friend finished off a part of the basement over six years ago to create a wonderful sewing space for me. It is 15 by 24 feet at one end. The other end is like a TV/stereo area along (so that DH could keep me company!) with a two-piece bathroom. The book was an invaluable aid in making use of what you already have before buying new things, and very good ergonomic information was given so that I could iron, cut and quilt at the frame without any discomfort. I love, love my studio!

  20. #20
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Fork Ca
    Posts
    8,257
    Electric outlets low on the wall or built into the floor. Big enough for a long arm lighting, lighting, lighting, cooling and heat, a cutting station, an ironing station and more than one sewing station so you can invite friends to play. Then there is always lighting, don't forget that. lol

  21. #21
    Super Member Snooze2978's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Carroll, Iowa
    Posts
    1,760
    As I was looking for a new house here in Iowa, I had my priorities to have a large enough area for my sewing room. I left Florida and an 18 x 10 room and it was just not large enough to hold everything. I now have the basement which is separated by a wall down the center which can not be removed safely as its a bearing wall so I opened the other end of the wall so I can walk thru from either end and gives more air flow. I think the total area is 25' x 29' with bump outs for the fridge/freezer, sink and PC armoire so there basically are not taking up this area. Since I had this much room I enlarged my cutting table to 6.5 x 4 which will get enlarged again with the new mat I'm ordering and I added a design wall 6 x 7.5 as that's all my ceilings would allow and then upgraded from a 10' quilt frame to a 12' which really made things tight. 6 bookcases full of fabrics, 2 embroidery machines, 2 sergers, kitchenette, ironing board, pegboards to hold all our little toys for our hobbies, TV/DVD, Ipod for music and books and of course, don't forget a full bathroom nearby so I never have to leave the basement. I only wish I had more windows but I did add shop lighting going across the room instead of the length of the room. I attached my roll of batting above my cutting table so its out of the way but nearby where I can get to it. I'm happy though would love just a few more feet of more all around. Let's face it we are rarely ever satisfied with what we have...................we always want more but I'll settle for what I have and be thankful.
    Suz in Iowa
    Designer EPIC, Babylock Ellegante, Brother XR3140
    Babylock Evolve, Elna 945
    Innova 26" LS, MQR
    ProQ Designer, EQ7, Embird

  22. #22
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    BC Canada
    Posts
    21
    Wow! Many, many thanks for all your wonderful suggestions. Lots of great ideas and things that I would never have thought of. I will get hold of the book suggested and break the news slowly to DH of all the things he needs to consider! When it is finished, probably this time next year (we are snow birds and head off to warmer climates for the winter), I will post pictures.

  23. #23
    Junior Member Suzan88's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Greenville, Maine
    Posts
    168
    Blog Entries
    14
    My studio, above the garage is 28x32 so I have a small kitchen, a shower room and a propane stove. A 50inch wide staircase is useful as I can get things up and down without struggling. And, with an eye to the future,it would be easy to fit a stairlift.

    I had electrical outlets sunk into the floor at 4 points so that I don't have wires trailing everywhere, plug points in the walls are at counter height. I put in open shelving designed for fabric storage but, on reflection, would have waited to see how I used the room before having permanent fixtures. There are windows all along one wall, window seats under windows on two other walls but no one ever sits there so they are just storage for little used items. There is room for two couches - one is a futon in case I want to stay there when guests are in the main house - and a big old rocking chair. If there is one thing I would change, apart from the spacing of the fixed shelving, it's the lighting. I didn't think I would need more than the recessed ceiling spot lights and wall lights but a couple of industrial lighting strips would make the space more useable in dreary weather. Despite having 12 windows there is not enough directional lighting. I was so concerned about it looking nice that I painted it neutral, had a finished floor with underfloor heating and quite forgot that I might want to splash paint around, do a bit of sanding, dye fabric in the industrial sink or generally make a bit of a mess or screw things to the walls. So it's a room that could become an apartment if anyone could get me out of it but, the point made about not using it as much as if it were attached to the house is worth considering. I tend not to go there if the rain is really bouncing, the snow is deep or it's the dead of night ...but once I get there I lose track of time. A covered walkway would fix wet weather access and a screened in porch would make it perfect. But almost perfect is good too.


    Suzan
    (Maine)
    Choose to be happy

  24. #24
    Super Member mary quite contrary's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,540
    A move back to the Midwest has meant a new sewing space will be required. As we began to review floor plans, hubby suggested I use the garage for my space. It will be 20 x 28 with windows to see four seasons of crops, a special chair for hubby to use when visiting me and just around the corner from laundry and kitchen. I feel truly blessed. I intended to have others visit often and share much laughter and stitching time together.

  25. #25
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    9,753
    Insulation, heating and cooling are the most important to me. Even if a space has it all but is too hot or too cold it will not get used.



    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriola View Post
    After many years of moving around the house, my DH has decided to build me a studio for quilting in the garden. I would appreciate any ideas as to size and suggestions of what to include. For those of you who have a studio what do you like most about it and what do you wish you had included? I am only a hobby quilter and enjoy other crafts too!
    Many thanks in advance for your help...it's wonderful to be able to ask the world for help!!
    Anna Quilts

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.