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Thread: Quilts to be sent out for long armed quilting

  1. #1
    Member
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    Hi Everyone
    I have made about a dozen hand-quilted quilts and now want to send out a king sized one to be professionally done by a long arm machine. I have no idea how to find one in area or what requirements in general are, such as do I sandwich it before sending; do I supply fabric for backing if I don't, etc. Also would like to know a ball park figure for different sizes. I live about 30 miles from New York City; can anyone help me with my many "first time" questions. Thank you. Victoria [email protected]
    :roll: :roll:

  2. #2
    Senior Member Connie1948's Avatar
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    Contact your local quilt shop. They will be able to give you a couple of numbers to call. Every Long Arm Quilter has their own way of doing things. You usually supply the backing and sometimes the batting. Around here they charge from .01 a square inch to .05 a square inch. The least expensive way to go is a edge to edge. Custom quilting gets very expensive. I a throw that I paid $225 for custom work. I have a queen size that I paid less than $80 for edge to edge. They are both beautiful. Expect 2 to 8 weeks turn around time for a good quilter....as word spreads. When you find one you love keep her as good ones are hard to find.

    Connie

  3. #3
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    You say "hand quilted" and I am wondering if you have sewn these quilts by hand, as opposed to using a sewing machine.

    My thinking is: if these are hand-made quilts, they would increase in value if they were also hand quilted.

    I don't think I would take a hand-made quilt to have a long-arm quilter quilt them. You will need to decide what type of quilting is best for the particular type of quilts you have to be quilted.

    I know someone in Missouri who does hand quilting, but I would have to ask if she is available for this work. She is not terribly expensive. Most often this type of work is sent via mail and not carried into a shop, unless your LQS knows of hand quilters. Individual quilters have different requirements. Some want you to furnish the backing, others don't care.

    I hope you find the best person to do this job for you. Your quilts represent a lot of time and love!

    June in Cincinnati




  4. #4

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    Each person will have different requirements. Most longarmers do not want you to baste the quilt. Depending on who you have do it they carry things like backing material and batting that you can purchase from them, but you don't have to. You can always buy your own and sent it with the quilt top. Depending on the longarmer they like between 4" to 7" all the way around extra for the batting and the backing.

    When you have something hand quilted every little bit that you do saves you money. If you baste the quilt that will save time for the hand quilter, if you collect all the pieces that also saves them. Normally with hand quilting they charge by the "yard of thread used" so each quilt gets a different price at the end depending on how much quilting. But the quotes I've seen from places online it's about 4x as much. That is not always the case if you can locate a hand quilter yourself it will not cost nearly so much in overhead.

    As someone before me recommended my local quilt shop will happily put you in touch with a longarmer or a hand quilter that they know through the local quilt guild. Spend a little time online and sift through to gain information.

    For instance a computerized longarmer is a bit cheaper because they tell the machine to sew and off it goes on any number of preprogramed patterns. Vs. a handguided machine costs a little bit more because you are paying someone to sit with the machine and guide it through there are all different ability and skill levels for this last. The more years of experience the more they can charge. If you type "longarm quilting" into a google search you can get an idea of the different price points and what their requirements so that when you do meet with someone you will be on a more level footing with them.

    Once you've looked around a bit on line you can expand your search to be "longarm quilting in new york" ect. and you can use that to help you find a quilter as well.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Shelley's Avatar
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    You've been given some great information.

    One thing I'd like to add is that you are not restricted by location. Many of us have customers that we've never met. I have a friend, another longarmer, who has a group of top makers in the Netherlands who send several quilts a month to her. I've done some quilts from Alaska.

    The most important part of your search is to find someone who will listen to what you want, and your ability to describe what you want on that quilt. I have one lady who wants very little quilting, and is very exact on what it is that she wants done. I have another that says, "Let the quilt talk to you. I want to see what you come up with."

    Good luck on your search. Relax, enjoy the process!!! You may make a new friend in the process!

  6. #6
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    Connie,

    Thank you very much for all the info you have provided. It gives me much to consider and think about.

  7. #7
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    June -

    This quilt that I am referring to I did the top by sewing machine and the other ones that I have done I did all the tops by hand quilting after I did the sandwiching. However, I want to try out getting this one in question long arm machine finished.

    A good friend of mine (and my mentor) has made many many quilts but all aspects of them were done by hand so she is just as curious about the long arm process as I am.

    Thank you for your advice - I will adhere to it.

  8. #8
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    Elizabeth

    Thank you for replying to my quilting long arm questions. You have given me some good advice to mull over and I appreciate all of it. At least I know where to start!!

  9. #9
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    Shelley

    I have also found out that the net is a great place for responding information when asked for! It knows no boundaries as far as distance is concerned. Just like your advice that a long arm quilter doesn't have to be local and most likely will not be a "walk to place carrying my quilt!!"

    Thank you so much for your help.

  10. #10
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    Loretta

    The king quilt I mentioned was sewn by machine. I usually hand quilt my whole quilt but this time I wanted to try sending it to be long arm quilted.

    My friend has many quilt tops - mostly done by hand and put together and quilted the tops by hand too. We are just wanting to try out the long arm machine method

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