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Thread: Raw Edge Applique Washable ? Seriously...

  1. #1
    Junior Member LouBert's Avatar
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    I love to needle turn but want to try a full size quilt using raw edge, I am sooo not sure that the edges will not look frayed after washing, I need reassurance from your experience...thank you

  2. #2
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    How exactly do you plan to do it?

    Raw edge applique basically means that you expect the edges to fray when the quilt is washed. Any fusible that is strong enough to not allow raw edges to fray (and I'm not sure there are any) would be very stiff.

    I've seen raw edge done more for wallhangings and art quilts than for quilts that are to be used. However, it's fine to use raw edge in quilts that are going to be used as long as you know the edges will fray. It's a good look especially for homespun and country style quilts, although I've seen some modern type bright flowers done that way too and look great.

  3. #3
    craftoholic's Avatar
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    The only raw edge,I've ever done, I did a satin stitch around it, just out of this very fear... I'd like to know too. I've seen others suggest steam a seam underneath to prohibit fraying.. But is there a way to do with with out steam a seam, etc???
    Thanks for asking this question.

  4. #4
    Super Member rusty quilter's Avatar
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    I am thinking you would have a whole lot of threads all over the quilt, on the floor, on the bed, etc. on a pretty regular basis.

  5. #5
    craftoholic's Avatar
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    I guess, my fear would be they would fray too much. Could this be kept in check by double row stitching around the applique with a straight stitch?
    I dont mind a little fraying.

  6. #6
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    What frays are the threads between the straight stitching and the cut edge. The closer the stitching is to the raw edge, the less the fraying will be. A double row of straight stitching won't make a big difference from just a single row of straight stitching with slightly shorter-than-normal stitch length.

    I've seen some of the raw edge applique free-motion stitched, sometimes with decorative thread. That looks great too. In other words, you don't have to be exact with this method and stitch exactly 1/4" or 1/8" from the edge; you can get imaginative and free-motion as desired, even running over the edge. The only thing to be aware of is that if you don't stitch close to some edge, it will fray more than other edges.

    An example of this would be a flower center; you can free-motion stitch concentric wild circles inside the center using decorative thread and let the edges fray.

    In quilts that are going to be used, raw edge applique offers a different look than traditional applique. Doesn't mean it's better or worse. I think raw edge applique, at least in bed quilts that will be washed, would be better named frayed edge applique because that is the ultimate look that you get.

  7. #7
    Super Member hperttula123's Avatar
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    It will turn out fine. Here is a picture of one I have done that has already been washed. I even snipped the edges(like you would a rag quilt for more fraying). :)
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8
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    I zigzag mine with tiny stitches. I haven't washed any yet. I don't think they will fray very much because the stitches are so close together. That's what I'm hopin' anyway. :)

  9. #9
    Super Member JUNEC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    How exactly do you plan to do it?

    Raw edge applique basically means that you expect the edges to fray when the quilt is washed. Any fusible that is strong enough to not allow raw edges to fray (and I'm not sure there are any) would be very stiff.

    I've seen raw edge done more for wallhangings and art quilts than for quilts that are to be used. However, it's fine to use raw edge in quilts that are going to be used as long as you know the edges will fray. It's a good look especially for homespun and country style quilts, although I've seen some modern type bright flowers done that way too and look great.
    I've seen raw edging done on flower quilts - but it is expected to fray -

  10. #10
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    I agree with prism. Short stitches. Good luck!

  11. #11
    Super Member frarose's Avatar
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    I have a quilt that has raw edge flowers and they look great even after several washing. They fray some but don't ravel out completely. I think it looks great. I use it on my bed all the time.

  12. #12
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hperttula123
    It will turn out fine. Here is a picture of one I have done that has already been washed. I even snipped the edges(like you would a rag quilt for more fraying). :)
    It's so nice of you to show an example. IMHO, the amount of fraying would be acceptable.

  13. #13
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    I'm working on a raw edge applique now. I'm FMQing the edges of each piece with polyester monofilament to the muslin backing. I also plan on doing a fair amount of FMQ "thread paint" when I quilt it. I tried to make my monofilament stitches as close to the edge as possible.

    I know some of the edges are going to fray slightly.

    What I don't know is the intended use of the quilt (wall hanging or "used" lap throw) because it's a gift, so I can't ask :) I will however tell the recipient that some of the edges might fray, but should not "come apart" and if that look is Ok with her then by all means use it and wash on gentle cycle when needed - preferably in a front loader.

    here's a pic of the work in process - auditioning borders
    Name:  Attachment-192463.jpe
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    And a closeup of the center section. You can just see the monofilament in some of the blues and beigh's
    Name:  Attachment-192468.jpe
Views: 303
Size:  71.8 KB

  14. #14
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    It'll fray a bit, unless you use double sided fusable.

  15. #15
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
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    I have done a couple of raw edge quilts...both have washed beautifully! One is the Bull's Eye from Country Threads, and the other was a pattern with squares similar to the bull's eye...fun to make, and no problem washing.

  16. #16
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
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    I have done a couple of raw edge quilts...both have washed beautifully! One is the Bull's Eye from Country Threads, and the other was a pattern with squares similar to the bull's eye...fun to make, and no problem washing.

  17. #17
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Why not try Eleanor Burns' method where she sews the fusible material to the applique piece with the right side against the fusible side. Then turns it inside out so that she can iron it onto the background? That way you have quick enclosed pieces that won't fray.

  18. #18
    Senior Member shnnn's Avatar
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    I made one for my daughter a few years ago with butterflies fused on and then zig-zagged around. It gets washed often, and for the most part has held up well -- there are a few butterfly pieces that have come loose, but I think it was more the fabric than anything, I raided some friends stashes to finish all my butterflies and I don't think all of thier fabrics were prewashed, while mine were. So they shrunk away from the stitching.

  19. #19
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    I have only done a small piece this way (I do satin stitch on my edges). However I fused down all the pieces using Misy Fuse because it is so much softer and lighter, then I applied a piece of Misty Fuse over the top of the piece and fused it down. It does dull the colors quite a bit so you might want to audition them first. I also use this method for postcards so the little pieces stay stuck and cannot be picked off. I have that top here somewhere. The background was black so that is where the duller part shows. No stitching required.

  20. #20
    Senior Member izzybelle's Avatar
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    even if this one might loosen a little, I think it would look nice-like it was blowing in the breeze

  21. #21
    Senior Member brightstar_202's Avatar
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    I have always used raw edge applique dut to the fact that I did not know how to do it the right way first and I made sure the stiching was very close and it has done a great job and no freying. It has been 4 years on the first one and it was a double sixe bed quilt.

  22. #22
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    I have a beautiful lap quilt that my DMIL made. She gave it to me for Christmas 11 years ago. The label has a raw edged rose applique on it. Because the kids were not careful with it, I had to wash it several times. The fabric has faded, the binding is frayed, but the applique is not frayed. I just looked at it. She did a tiny zig zag stitch that was right on the edge. It's held up for 11 years and several washings.

    Why not do a test. Get a square of fabric and hem or serge the edges. Do a raw edge applique on it and then throw it into your laundry and have it go through several loads and see how it holds up.

    Remember raw edge applique is not the same as frayed edge applique.

    I have done applique the way Eleanor Burns does it. It works great on flowers and such, but if you have tiny or intricate pieces it won't work.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Johanna Fritz's Avatar
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    Edges will fray. Just that simple. If you don't want frayed edges, either don't wash, or sew with a seamed edge if you need to wash - either needle turn or machine applique with fusible. If you are worried about fabric being stiff with a fusible, try "Mistyfuse". It is a super thin web that hold like iron without getting stiff. Good luck.

  24. #24
    Super Member ConnieF's Avatar
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    hi Patch, i HAVE 2 OF THE SQ ones I need to get together.
    A bunch of us traded so we had a bigger vrity of fabrics in our quilts
    I love both the Bull's Eye and the sq. I first seenthe sqs at Quilt market in Portland Oregon at least 15 years ago and it was so hot for a while so non thinking LOL I need that sometimes... I love the raw edge, It will only ravel to the stitching line...
    Happy Quilting
    ConnieF

  25. #25
    Senior Member Quilting Grandma's Avatar
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    Hi' I did a raw edge quilt with animals on it for my DGS, he was 4. That was 4 years ago and it is still going strong. It gets washed frequently and looks great. I used varying sizes of buttonhole stitch. goos luck, i would go ahead and do your quilt.

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