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Thread: Red flannel bled into the light blue, help!!

  1. #26
    Senior Member arimuse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barbshobbies
    Many years ago there was a rule....Always set anything that is colored red before use. I thought it is o.k. now, but I guess not. There are many ways to do this. Soak item in ice water..Does not always work. Wash in cold water and mild soap. and also soak in salt water. Be sure to test it for bleeding before using it. So Sorry it happened. You would think there would be a product on the market for this by now.
    I think I read or someone told me a long time ago, to set your fabric color wash in warm water with some white vinegar. I do this, but never really knew if it worked since I dont use such strong colors. (but, Ive not ever had bleeding issues either)sharet

  2. #27
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    I always wash flannel and most of my cotton if they are bright or in the red family. I just washed a red that I can not set. i used salt water, tried vingar--still bleeds. One quilt shop told me to try "retayne" or synthropol? She said most shops carry it. I am going to look for it--she was sold out.
    Not sure of the spelling.
    SandyGail

  3. #28

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    Try Synthrapol--available at LQS. I rescued a shirt for my husband that had bled onto itself--big blue streaks across the entire shirt--discovered when I went to iron it. It has been washed and dried in the drier. Used the synthrapol with great success. Follow the intructions to the letter.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseP
    Yup. A day late and a dollar short, just like always.
    Oh Denise, you "sound" so chagrined with yourself it makes me sad for you.

    Don't give up hope yet!

    One thing to try is to take some tape (duct or masking) and dab it at the red spots. You may discover it's not really bleeding dye but just gobs of lint stuck in place.

    If it isn't lint woven in, then try washing the quilt again, using LOTS of detergent and a high water level. If the red dye molecules are just staining the blue rather than actually molecularly attached to the blue fibres, the detergent and high water level will help them float loose again and stay suspended in the water.

    If you try lots of detergent and high water level, be prepared to give it an extra rinse or three to get all of the detergent out.

    If it were me, being a hand dyer, my third option would be to overdye with a light red, which would give the light blue patches a purple-ish tinge. I'd do it the low water immersion way, to get a lot of deliberate mottling.

    And then if overdyeing didn't give me a look I was happy with, then I'd stencil with fabric paints or Shiva Paintstiks. If the batting is cotton, then the heat of an iron won't hurt it to set the paint or Paintstiks. If the batting is polyester, then I'd use Shiva Paintstiks, let them dry for at least a couple weeks (to polymerise as much as possible) and then toss it in a warm dryer to set the Paintstiks.

    There's hardly ever a mistake in textile arts that can't be fixed, changed into a feature or transformed. And those are usually the pieces that turn out the most stunning!

    I guess I'm trying to say that this is an opportunity, not a mistake to beat yourself up with.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by fabric_fancy
    i would baste color catchers or carbona over the offending area and wash again.
    never heard of this, but sounds like a good idea...let us know how it all turns out...

  6. #31
    Senior Member DeniseP's Avatar
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    I went to a quilt show last Friday and someone told me about the "retayne" (I'm not sure of spelling either!) that got out the red from a red and white quilt she had made. The red had been washed and dried prior to making the quilt and it still ran into the white. I will look for this stuff at our local quilt shop. I probably could have found it at the quilt show, but I was on my way out and was exhausted and had already spent too much money! Thanks for your help.
    Quote Originally Posted by SandyGail
    I always wash flannel and most of my cotton if they are bright or in the red family. I just washed a red that I can not set. i used salt water, tried vingar--still bleeds. One quilt shop told me to try "retayne" or synthropol? She said most shops carry it. I am going to look for it--she was sold out.
    Not sure of the spelling.
    SandyGail

  7. #32
    Senior Member DeniseP's Avatar
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    I am also afraid that after washing this quilt top it will not look good enough to give away, let alone trying to sell it!

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseP
    I went to a quilt show last Friday and someone told me about the "retayne" (I'm not sure of spelling either!) that got out the red from a red and white quilt she had made. The red had been washed and dried prior to making the quilt and it still ran into the white. I will look for this stuff at our local quilt shop.
    Retayne does not work that way. It is a chemical solution that SETS dye. If an area that was red came out after being washed with Retayne, that means that it was just stained rather than the dye molecularly bonded with the fibres. And in that case, any good detergent, such as Synthrapol, would have done the job. In fact, any ordinary detergent like Tide or Era or whatever, would have done the job.

    I am not out to tell anyone what they should or should not do but I am trying to provide accurate information.

    One concern I have about Retayne is that it contains formaldehyde, which stays in any fabric it is applied to.

    Strictly for myself, I would never use Retayne on anything intended for infant use. Babies put things in their mouths and have much lower bodyweight than adults, so they tend to get a heavier exposure to anything in their environment than an adult would.

    However, someone else's risk/benefit analysis may well end up with a different outcome than mine. It isn't for me to say what other people should or should not do.

  9. #34
    Senior Member DeniseP's Avatar
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    Thank you so much for this information. I will definitely not use this stuff at all. I don't want anything in my quilts that could harm anyone, baby or not.

    Quote Originally Posted by MsEithne
    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseP
    I went to a quilt show last Friday and someone told me about the "retayne" (I'm not sure of spelling either!) that got out the red from a red and white quilt she had made. The red had been washed and dried prior to making the quilt and it still ran into the white. I will look for this stuff at our local quilt shop.
    Retayne does not work that way. It is a chemical solution that SETS dye. If an area that was red came out after being washed with Retayne, that means that it was just stained rather than the dye molecularly bonded with the fibres. And in that case, any good detergent, such as Synthrapol, would have done the job. In fact, any ordinary detergent like Tide or Era or whatever, would have done the job.

    I am not out to tell anyone what they should or should not do but I am trying to provide accurate information.

    One concern I have about Retayne is that it contains formaldehyde, which stays in any fabric it is applied to.

    Strictly for myself, I would never use Retayne on anything intended for infant use. Babies put things in their mouths and have much lower bodyweight than adults, so they tend to get a heavier exposure to anything in their environment than an adult would.

    However, someone else's risk/benefit analysis may well end up with a different outcome than mine. It isn't for me to say what other people should or should not do.

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