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Thread: Rotary Cutters Help

  1. #1
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    Rotary Cutters Help

    I have Arthritis in my right hand and find it painful to use my rotary cutter, some where I saw a rotary cutter which was developed for people with hands like mine. Has any one any knowledge of this cutter Any help would be great
    Thanks in advance

    Dale.

  2. #2
    Senior Member BeckyB's Avatar
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    http://quiltbug.com/notions/martelli.htm
    this is what I found on the internet search
    Do not know anything about it though
    It is easier to be wise for others than for ourselves.

  3. #3
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    The Martelli rotary cutter is ergonomically more correct and therefore puts much less stress on the hand and wrist. I have one and I have to agree it's easier on the hand and wrist. However, it does take some time to adapt to the different hand position. I also (if I am remembering correctly) found it difficult to use with the June Taylor Shape Cut mat for cutting strips.

    Aside from the Martelli rotary cutter, you might want to consider investing in an Accuquilt Go! or Accuquilt Studio die cutter. Lots of people with arthritis find those machines easier to use. The downside is the dollar-cost.

    Edit: Here is a link to the rotary cutter portion of the Martelli website:
    http://www.martellicatalog.com/mm5/m...tegory_Code=RC
    They also have quite a few videos on Youtube. Here is a link to their Youtube video about the cutter:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJRQGFYoO2Q

    Note that their cutters come in a right-hand and left-hand version. You need to order the correct one for your handedness.
    Last edited by Prism99; 06-24-2013 at 07:10 PM.

  4. #4
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    Thank you,Becky B and Prism 99 for your instant replies, yes that looks like the cutter I saw, I doubt if I could buy that in New Zealand, but will see if the MSQC has them, I could combine the cutter with a daily deal vbg
    Dale

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    Do the Marttli cutters take the Olfa blades?
    Thank you
    Dale

  6. #6
    Senior Member BeckyB's Avatar
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    http://www.fabric.com/notions-patter...nd-blades.aspx
    this says no but I do not know for sure
    It is easier to be wise for others than for ourselves.

  7. #7
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    About the Martelli rotary cutter:
    - you need to have intact right [or left if you are a lefty, or have become one due to arthritis] index finger because in using the ruler you need that index finger pressure. OK, sometimes you can use the third finger, but those joints need to be intact also.
    - since Martelli blades fit the Olfas I expec the Olfa blades would fit the Martelli. However, many friends do report that the Martelli blades do last longer .... esp in combo with a Martelli mat.

    With arthritis in your hands, expect things to change as you go. I started with a Fiskars, changed to a Martelli, then am now back at Olfa - the one with the retractable blade when you don't use it ... sorta a pistol grip, if you will. Adaptation to what fits you is the key. TYry friends' cutters before you buy if you can.

    I also now use my Alto's QuiltCut2 more consistently as holding rulers hurts. The Alto's only requires one pressure point to hold the cutting edge in place and even that doesn't require as much pressure as most rulers. Some rotary rulers work better for me. Again, try different ones before you buy.

    With arthritis it is better if you can also adapt the height of your cutting table. This will help you preserve function longer.

    The type sewing machine you use may change. I went straight to Pfaff due to the dual feed technology so I don't have to work to hold my fabric like I used to.

    I also have what was called a Third Hand - for cutting templates - not the third hand for hand work. It had a revolving base and an overhead central clamp to hold a template while I cut around the template, revolving the base as I cut. I'll try to find out if such a thing is made anymore.
    Have fun quilting! If it isn't fun, you will miss a lot.
    ali

  8. #8
    Super Member Normabeth's Avatar
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    I use the Martelli rotary cutter which is ergonomically made to hold in you hand more easily.
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  9. #9
    Member ThreadsofTimeFab's Avatar
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    You might also look into the Comfort Cutter from True Cut.

  10. #10
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    I would suggest an Omnigrid 45 mm rotary cutter. The handle is thicker . There is no left or right. Your thumb is the potion which controls the blade.

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    Unfortunately it is my thumb and wrist that is plagued with arthritis, I only hope the voltaran Osteo Gel will give me some relief

  12. #12
    Super Member Weezy Rider's Avatar
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    The older Martelli cutters do use Olfa, Fiskars blades. I don't know about the newer ones. I have a couple from about 5 - 6 years ago.

    The Truecut is pretty good also. That guide system can be removed and used like a regular cutter. I removed it from one of mine as Truecut doesn't have some of the rulers I want. I've removed it on both 45 and 18mm cutters.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by kamaiarigby View Post
    I have Arthritis in my right hand and find it painful to use my rotary cutter, some where I saw a rotary cutter which was developed for people with hands like mine. Has any one any knowledge of this cutter Any help would be great
    Thanks in advance

    Dale.
    The Martelli cutter is made for people with Arthritis, carpal tunnel, or hand fatigue problems. The cutter is designed to put the cutting pressure on the palm of the handle and not the fingers.
    The first finger lays over the top of the cutter to stabilize, the thumb is used to stabilize and control the side to side motion of the cutter.
    As for the blade interchange with Olfa, this is a big no. The Olfa blades have triangle cut outs and will actually cut into the screw that holds the blade on the Martelli, the blade can actually cut the screw that holds the blade and w whill cause the blade to wobble and if it cuts through the hardened screw, could cause injury. So for the same reason, the Martelli blades will not fit the Olfa cutters. They will fit the Fiskars as these cutters have round center axle. If you buy a Martelli have the person show you how to use it as it is a bit different when holding it to cut. The cutter is held at a 90 degree straight angle with your ruler, your elbow at your waist, and you swing your arm with the cut just as you would if you were reaching for something. This is the reason a lot of people that buy the Martelli end up disliking them because they were never shown how to properly use them. Everyone that I have sold gets a lesson and are told to go home and cut as much scrap as they can to become familiar with the "feel" of the cutter. When it feels right you can feel the cut as well as hear the difference in the sound of the cutter.
    If I can help with any other information please e-mail me. I have sold a number of these cutters over the last 10 years I have owned my shop.
    OzarksGma
    OzarksGma

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