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Rulers - Why to use the same brand for the whole project

Rulers - Why to use the same brand for the whole project

Old 11-11-2023, 07:47 AM
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Default Rulers - Why to use the same brand for the whole project

This has puzzled me for years - Isn't an inch an inch an inch?

(I do not care for the Quilter's Rule rulers that have the thick raised ridges on the underside of them. They were the first ones I purchased - on the advice either a quilt shop person or my first quilting instructor. Why I do not like them - because of the thick lines - which side of the line do I measure from? )

With all the other rulers I have, when I hold them next to each other and line up the lines, they seem to align well.
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Old 11-11-2023, 08:05 AM
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Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
This has puzzled me for years - Isn't an inch an inch an inch?

(I do not care for the Quilter's Rule rulers that have the thick raised ridges on the underside of them. They were the first ones I purchased - on the advice either a quilt shop person or my first quilting instructor. Why I do not like them - because of the thick lines - which side of the line do I measure from? )

With all the other rulers I have, when I hold them next to each other and line up the lines, they seem to align well.
I think this may have been more of an issue years ago. hopefully manufacturing has advanced and there is more precision now. But you do mention a prime reason why it is good to use the same brand of ruler. The lines do vary with thickness and that can make a difference with how you line up the fabric to cut. Bonnie Hunter advises to make sure that the line is completely covering the fabric when you make your cut. I use the little blank spaces to make sure I can see that the fabric is underneath the rulers measuring line. If you only bring the fabric up to the line, you will have to thin up your seam to get the final finished piece the right size. By always placing the fabric the same way you also get a more precision cut which makes it easier to get your finished pieces the size you want.
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Old 11-11-2023, 08:34 AM
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Don't know much about the modern status of things... but traveling in the way back machine there were different rules for different rulers, whether you cut on the lines or next to the lines. It can make a difference, but also your seam size probably makes more of a difference. When I first started quilting I started being very precise, as the decades have passed I'm happier with my cut large and trim down and I get better results. With my vision issues, many of the rulers are just too busy for me with the lines and hatch marks and colors and clear or cloudy and all the other innovations that are put in to make themselves different from each other. Seriously, I can't see the 1/8th marks much less 1/16, so I typically only use 1/4" increments. Don't care if the math (along with perfect seam allowances) for a triangle is +7/8ths to the measurement. 1" barely wastes any fabric and does give enough for either forgiveness or worthwhile trimming off.

Unlike you -- I do like the quilters rule for the grip on my long cuts! I know there are other options now from weights to sandpaper dots, but non-slip is my way to go! I also think how you cut with the quilters rule makes a difference. I typically use the two rulers technique where i establish my depth of cut with one ruler and then line up the Quilters Rule for the long cut. To help with my vision and accuracy (and a bit of anti-slip) if I'm cutting a lot of strips, I will mark the measurement with tape so I don't have to focus in on those little hatches.
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Old 11-11-2023, 09:14 AM
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Bear, I have a similar issue with the Omnigrip rulers - don’t like the wide green lines and trying to peer through them.

I have mixed the Omnigrids with Creative Grids successfully, though it does seem easier to stay with one line if you have enough of them.

hugs, charlotte

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Old 11-11-2023, 10:05 AM
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I've heard of sewing the whole project on the same machine but never about using the same ruler. Alas, I have never followed this rule. I cheerfully use my 6x24 ruler to cut lengths, then my 4x12 ruler for smaller bits and various square rulers depending on what size block I'm squaring up. I've never noticed rulers making a difference but I am aware of where I place the ruler line relative to the fabric.
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Old 11-11-2023, 01:21 PM
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I have heard "use the same brand ruler" from more than one person. I use lots of different brands, all in the same project. And I do as much cutting as possible using the strip dies on my AccuQuilt Studio. As you say, an inch is an inch.
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Old 11-12-2023, 09:22 AM
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I took a rotary cutting class/demo at fabric shop decades ago when I first started quilting. The woman was a rep from Omnigrid I think. She said over an over the first thing that is important is be sure the ruler line is completely on the fabric before cutting. She had examples of sewn squares with the line on the fabric and sample of the line off the fabric. Big difference in the finished size of each block.The rulers then had thicker lines. I like Quilter's Select Rulers the best, they have thin lines. Creative Grids for the sizes QS does not have.
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Old 11-12-2023, 04:00 PM
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I have more of an issue with that minuscule 'wow' along the edge of a ruler, that develops over time and use. I hate throwing out rulers but found I could no longer trust my 6x24 inch ruler to actually measure 6 inches all the way along. I finally decided to relegate that ruler to the 'helper' role--for when I need something like 10 inches wide by 20 inches long. I use my newer and more accurate 8.5x24 ruler to actually make the cut, but line up the old ruler beside it to achieve the 10 inch width.
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Old 11-12-2023, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by GingerK View Post
I have more of an issue with that minuscule 'wow' along the edge of a ruler, that develops over time and use. I hate throwing out rulers but found I could no longer trust my 6x24 inch ruler to actually measure 6 inches all the way along. I finally decided to relegate that ruler to the 'helper' role--for when I need something like 10 inches wide by 20 inches long. I use my newer and more accurate 8.5x24 ruler to actually make the cut, but line up the old ruler beside it to achieve the 10 inch width.
That wear curve on a ruler sneaks up on one.

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Old 11-12-2023, 07:10 PM
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A basic size ruler used a lot is not one time buy. When I find a good sale on the basc sizes I use I buy extra. I keep a new one of each in my stash. I save money because they are always higher price when I need a new one. My problem is dropping the ruler and the corner gets cracked off long before they get warped.
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