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Thread: Scaling patterns

  1. #1

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    Hi,
    I am rather new at all this quilt stuff and am having
    kind of a hard time judging how much fabric I will
    need when I want to make a quilt larger than what the
    directions call for. Is there an easy way to calculate
    the amount needed to make a larger size or do you just
    wing it? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks, Donna

  2. #2
    Boo
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    Donna, although figuring additional yardage may seem complicated it really isn't. It is just a matter of reducing the task to it's basic elements, which are the size and number of strips needed. Each pattern will list cutting instructions for the yardage requirements to accomplish the size of the quilt as stated. If you wish to enlarge a quilt, lets say by a row of 6 blocks, figure how much fabric you will need for those additional blocks. The safest method would be to consider all fabric to be 42"wide. Okay are you with me so far? You know that math is coming, but don't zone out on me. This is simple, no quantum physics involved. Grab a calcualtor. If you need additional 6" squares, you will first need to know how many times 6 goes into 42". See told you not hard, so now how many 6" strips you need to cut would be 1 strip for every 7 squares. This is how you would figure additional yardage. It never hurts to buy extra, that is how a stash is built. :lol: Before you know it, you will have enough to play a new game called Scrap Quilts. :D

  3. #3

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    Boo
    Your explanation is excellent. I used to do that until I bought the book (very skinny, like a magazine) “Patchwork Minus Mathwork” by Linda Cause published by American School of Needlework. It gives you the amounts for almost everything you will need in quilting. It is one “must” have book in my opinion.
    Lucia

  4. #4
    Boo
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    Lucia, now you tell me! I will look for the book and see if it something I want to own. You know, those teachers and my folks pounded addition and times tables into me for a reason, so using that for quilting doesn't seem such a stretch for me. The truth is that a dollar store calculator is my best friend in the sewing room. It really isn't all that difficult, and sometimes saves fabric. when I'm short on money. Figuring what you need for yourself, is the first step in making a designer out of you. The next step will be easier, making changes to a layout and how to figure what pieces are needed for an on point set. Believe me, we all have these skills and the knowledge, it just been pushed to a back file cabinet in our minds. We are Quilter's! We don't need no stinking books! :lol: Ok, sometimes we do. This house is full of them. :lol:

  5. #5

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    Boo
    I agree with you 100%; I am really good in math and geometry, so these things are not a problem. One of the reasons I do not calculate everything myself is that the book was inexpensive and I bought it 50% off. The other is that many times, since I did a very strong chemo therapy for breast cancer, I get a little confused and have to write everything down and takes more time. And it is easier to look for some things, like, how much to buy for a bias bidding. Actually I had already the book when I was diagnosed. I used to work in a quilting store and used it all the time to help costumers. And, by the way, someone gave me a quilter’s calculator because they did not like it; I am not impressed by it also. Any opinions out there?
    Lucia
    PS. I do not think I own anything that I had to pay full price for it. I teach Senior Citizens and the one of the program’s director is shocked at how much stuff I buy with the purchase order. And being a big mouth -- with a big accent -- everybody knows me and when I ask for discounts for the Centers I always get 50%.

  6. #6
    Boo
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    Lucia, you need to be commended for your work with the Seniors. As I am fast approaching that age myself, maybe you will keep me busy. :lol: So there is a benefit to having a big mouth and big accent. I just wonder what accent would work for me. Any suggestions? :lol: I already have the big mouth.

  7. #7
    Leslee's Avatar
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    Boo, you should be able to get discounts by charm alone, you don't need an accent or anything else! I'm going to try to find that booklet, Lucia. I've always had "math anxiety" but approached quiltmaking with such reckless abandon that being brain damaged in the math department didn't matter to me. My quilts get a little wonky around the edges at times and "It'll quilt out!" gets hollered from the sewing room now and then :roll: !!

  8. #8

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    It’s OK about approaching the new identification “Senior”. Although I am not 60 yet, I receive lots of discounts in stores that consider 55 the big "S" age, so … Boo, you can have a few extra $ to buy more fabric!
    Lucia

  9. #9
    Boo
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    You girls are cracking me up! Lucia, we are the same age! I guess we should consider becoming roomies in the senior center! Maybe Leslee will bring us quilty supplies. :lol:

  10. #10
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    HA! Leslee's in the same age group, m'dear! 53 in February! I just don't write (or act!) my age :lol: Why should anyone? It's just a number!! But YES I would bring the "quilty supplies" maybe even share the fat quarters. I said "maybe" ... ;-)

  11. #11

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    Hey, stop making me feel old. I am 57! Am I the one leading the line to the Senior Center? Well, at least my car already knows the way!!!
    I do not act –or dress – my age ether. As my philosopher youngest son says <> or that <>. :lol: On the other end, when he was 7 years old, he had an assignment in school and had to write about his family and he wrote that << my mom used to be very smart; she used to be a chemical engineer but now … she is just a mom (and dumb I take it) :( >>.
    Lucia


  12. #12
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    Lucia, there's a translation for what 7-year-olds say: "Just a mom" = "My whole world". We can all tell you have an engineer's mind--just look at the way you problem solve with all the tips you've been sharing! If we all were fortunate enough to end up in the same Senior Center, I'd want one of the chairs at your table just so I wouldn't miss anything!

  13. #13
    Suz
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    OK! Guess I need to get into this discussion.
    Lucia, I beat you. I turned 70 in October and I still wear blue jeans, t-shirts and sneakers. My 4Hers asked how long we will continue quilting since there are only eight years of programs established and four of them are third year quilters. I told them it depended upon me and how long I last. But I do believe I have a good five left.
    Healthwise, I have had to have a few repairs, but I am still going strong.
    Years ago, when one of my son's friends asked how old I was, Steve told him I was is in the space age, "39 and holding". Soooo, I am still holding.
    Blessings to you all, Suzanne

  14. #14
    community benefactor Knot Sew's Avatar
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    When my granson asked how old I was , I told him I was as young as spring and old as dirt, so he figurd out I was middle age. Age gives you freedom to be your self and not worry about what the world thinks. Some days I am young and some very old. I will be 62 in 07 and will retire. The only discount I seem to get is the salvation army thrift store. does Joanns have a discount program, love the coupons.

    :) :D :-o :lol: 8) :P :wink: :thumbup: :lol: :-o :mrgreen: :) :thumbup: :roll: :lol: :lol: :-D

  15. #15
    Senior Member Marilyn Philips's Avatar
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    :D Lucia: This book sounds great, but can it be used for reducing yardage to make a smaller version of a full sized quilt? Can it be ordered by e-mail or catalog? Hoping you can let me know because I see a lot of beautiful patterns I would like to try, but at age 76 I have just recently become (hopefully) a quilter so I am trying to concentrate on smaller items like wall hangings to build my skills up. :thumbup:

  16. #16

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    Hi Marilyn
    Yes, the book is still available, at list you can buy it from the used book sellers at Amazon.com. Here is the link:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0881959456/sr=8-1/qid=1171723981/ref=pd_bbs_sr_olp_1/002-0903866-6052006?ie=UTF8&s=books

    I would say yes to the other questions. Let’s see if I can give you an example:
    If you have the pattern for a queen size quilt A, and you want to make a twin size B:

    A---you know you need 1 yd to cut 110 X 3” squares
    If for B you only need 55 X 3” squares (you will need to cut 55 X 3 1/5” for seem allowances) the chart shows you will need only 1/2 yd of the same fabric.
    I am going to “try” to scan (I am not so good at this stuff…) the book’s table of contents for you to give you an idea of what is included.
    You still have some math to do, like the total of how many of squares or triangles do you need for the number of blocks for your size; then you see how much you need to buy.
    Or:
    You want exact the same pattern with the same amount of blocks, but you want to make them smaller to fit the twin size. You can see the yardage you need through one of the charts.
    I do not know if I am able to explain it well; I would say you need to look at the book and see if it makes sense to you. I know some people do not understand charts or road maps … some thing I do well… So, do not know what to tell you.
    Good luck
    Lucia

  17. #17

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    Table of Contents

    How to Use This Book ............................. 1
    Planning a Quilt .................................. 2
    Standard Mattress Sizes......................... 6
    Suggested Quilt Sizes. .......................... 6
    Quilt Sizes and Number of Blocks
    Straight Set. .................................. 7
    Straight Set with Sashing. ....................... 8
    Straight Set with Alternating Squares ............. 10
    Diagonal Set. ................................ 11
    Diagonal Set with Sashing. ..................... 12
    Diagonal Set with Alternating Squares ............ 17
    Figuring Yardage
    Rectangles .................................. 19
    Squares. .................................... 20
    Half Square Triangles ......................... 22
    Quarter Square Triangles ...................... 23

    Figuring Yardage (cont.)
    Sashing Strips ............................... 25
    Diamonds (60 degree)......................... 26
    Diamonds (45 degree). ........................ 26
    Borders. .................................... 27
    Quilt Backing. ............................... 27
    Binding
    Double-fold ............................. 28
    Single-fold .............................. 28
    Diagonal Measurement of Blocks.................... 28
    Bias Binding .................................... 29
    Batting......................................... 30
    Metric Conversions .............................. 30
    Quilt Worksheet. ................................ 31
    Shopping List ................................... 33

    How to Use This Book

    Patchwork Minus Mathwork is a collection of charts to help you plan a quilt and figure yardages without doing the math.
    Go through the steps in Planning a Quilt, pages 2 to 6, along with the Figuring Yardage charts, pages 19 to 30 and use the Quilt Worksheet, pages 31 and 32, to figure yardages you will need for your quilt. Then write the amounts on the Shopping List (inside back cover) and you're ready to go to your local quilt shop or fabric store.
    Although it would be impossible to include every size in the Quilt Sizes and Number of Blocks charts, pages 7 to 18, there are enough choices that you will surely find one that suits your needs. These are meant to be guidelines for planning your quilt, not hard and fast rules. Once you have chosen a block, look through the charts and find a size that is compatible with your needs. The chart will tell you how many blocks you will need, what size they should be and anything else (sashing strips, sash¬ing squares, plain squares, or setting triangles) you will need to complete your quilt. Keep in mind, the quilt sizes in the charts do not include borders. If you want to add borders to make fewer or larger blocks, you can still use the information in the charts. A quilt with a specific block layout will have the same information no matter what size the block is. For example, a diagonal set quilt with a block layout of 4 x 5 will always have 32 blocks and 14 setting triangles as noted in the chart on page 11. Just be aware that your quilt measurement may not be the same as our example.

    The yardage charts in this book are based on a fabric width of 40". This allows for variances in fabric width off the bolt and shrinkage from washing. Simple layouts shown with the charts show the most efficient use of fabric. It is easiest to use a rotary cutter (also, the appropriate mat and ruler) to first cut strips the correct width, then cut into squares, rectangles, triangles, or dia¬monds. If using templates, use the same layout and butt up the edges of the template right next to each other to use as little fab¬ric as possible.
    The Border and Binding Yardage charts include several sizes of borders, but if the size you want is not included, you can still use the charts. Just go to the next widest border and buy the suggested yardage knowing that you will have a little leftover. Also, if the perimeter of your quilt is not one of those listed in the chart, always go to the next highest number and use that yardage.
    Remember: A good rule of thumb is that it is always best to add at least V4 yard to all measurements for insurance. It is always better to have leftover fabric than it is to run out of a particular fabric and not be able to purchase more.

  18. #18

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    Marilyn
    Let's see if this works!
    Lucia
    Table of Contents

    How to Use This Book ............................. 1
    Planning a Quilt .................................. 2
    Standard Mattress Sizes......................... 6
    Suggested Quilt Sizes. .......................... 6
    Quilt Sizes and Number of Blocks
    Straight Set. .................................. 7
    Straight Set with Sashing. ....................... 8
    Straight Set with Alternating Squares ............. 10
    Diagonal Set. ................................ 11
    Diagonal Set with Sashing. ..................... 12
    Diagonal Set with Alternating Squares ............ 17
    Figuring Yardage
    Rectangles .................................. 19
    Squares. .................................... 20
    Half Square Triangles ......................... 22
    Quarter Square Triangles ...................... 23

    Figuring Yardage (cont.)
    Sashing Strips ............................... 25
    Diamonds (60 degree)......................... 26
    Diamonds (45 degree). ........................ 26
    Borders. .................................... 27
    Quilt Backing. ............................... 27
    Binding
    Double-fold ............................. 28
    Single-fold .............................. 28
    Diagonal Measurement of Blocks.................... 28
    Bias Binding .................................... 29
    Batting......................................... 30
    Metric Conversions .............................. 30
    Quilt Worksheet. ................................ 31
    Shopping List ................................... 33

    How to Use This Book

    Patchwork Minus Mathwork is a collection of charts to help you plan a quilt and figure yardages without doing the math.
    Go through the steps in Planning a Quilt, pages 2 to 6, along with the Figuring Yardage charts, pages 19 to 30 and use the Quilt Worksheet, pages 31 and 32, to figure yardages you will need for your quilt. Then write the amounts on the Shopping List (inside back cover) and you're ready to go to your local quilt shop or fabric store.
    Although it would be impossible to include every size in the Quilt Sizes and Number of Blocks charts, pages 7 to 18, there are enough choices that you will surely find one that suits your needs. These are meant to be guidelines for planning your quilt, not hard and fast rules. Once you have chosen a block, look through the charts and find a size that is compatible with your needs. The chart will tell you how many blocks you will need, what size they should be and anything else (sashing strips, sash¬ing squares, plain squares, or setting triangles) you will need to complete your quilt. Keep in mind, the quilt sizes in the charts do not include borders. If you want to add borders to make fewer or larger blocks, you can still use the information in the charts. A quilt with a specific block layout will have the same information no matter what size the block is. For example, a diagonal set quilt with a block layout of 4 x 5 will always have 32 blocks and 14 setting triangles as noted in the chart on page 11. Just be aware that your quilt measurement may not be the same as our example.

    The yardage charts in this book are based on a fabric width of 40". This allows for variances in fabric width off the bolt and shrinkage from washing. Simple layouts shown with the charts show the most efficient use of fabric. It is easiest to use a rotary cutter (also, the appropriate mat and ruler) to first cut strips the correct width, then cut into squares, rectangles, triangles, or dia¬monds. If using templates, use the same layout and butt up the edges of the template right next to each other to use as little fab¬ric as possible.
    The Border and Binding Yardage charts include several sizes of borders, but if the size you want is not included, you can still use the charts. Just go to the next widest border and buy the suggested yardage knowing that you will have a little leftover. Also, if the perimeter of your quilt is not one of those listed in the chart, always go to the next highest number and use that yardage.
    Remember: A good rule of thumb is that it is always best to add at least V4 yard to all measurements for insurance. It is always better to have leftover fabric than it is to run out of a particular fabric and not be able to purchase more.





  19. #19
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    My favorite method of scaling patterns is to go to the quilt store to and ask the knowledgeable people there and they do all the thinking and calculating. If you must do it yourself, consider the size of the block and how many blocks will come closest to the width and length that you want your quilt to be. Sometimes you have to go a block bigger than you wanted to come out right with the pattern or a block less and then you may think about adding several borders to make the the desired size. After that I can decide if I need to increase my yardage by 1/3 or 1/2 and multiply the fabric requirements of each fabric for new yardage. If you end up with a strange number, roundup for safety sake.
    Well--like I said go the quilt shop!
    Rita :wink:

  20. #20
    Senior Member Marilyn Philips's Avatar
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    Lucia: :P Your information on scaling patterns has been very helpful and I was able to obtain the book for only $3.89 on e-mail and it was in brand new conditon. Thank you so much. :mrgreen: :P :P

  21. #21
    Senior Member Marilyn Philips's Avatar
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    Ritamaew: Thanks so much for your info on scaling patterns. Between your information and obtaining the book referred to in other messages I think I will be OK with trying to get a better overall picture of what to do. Thanks so much. :D :D :D

  22. #22
    Senior Member DebJ's Avatar
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    Lucia, I only took the minimumly required math in school. Who would of thought I would willingly be doing something that require it so much or that even with math it would be so fun. However, sounds like that would be a book I would used. I too got one of those calulaters but haven't used it much. It did help me get the measurement across to given square center so I could decide what size square I wanted to cut. :shock: Would like to get better at using but that might take away too much from my actual quilting time. :lol:

  23. #23
    ready2quilt's Avatar
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    I just ordered the book for $3.49 brand new, but shipping was $4.05. That's really where they make extra $$, like when you order from Amazon, most books are a flat 3.99. When I get them, the postage is usually in the 2.50 range. A buck and a half adds up even when they use padded envelopes and such.

  24. #24
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
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    I found a great computer software for beginers. Its called Quilt Design Wizard by the Electric Quilt Co. You have 200 blocks to choose from and you can size it to your specifications. It is user friendly and only costs $29.00. They have a website but it is also in quilting mags. I think it is great. YOu can choose fabrics and colors and borders. It prints out patterns and give you instructions. You can even set it for paper pieceing patterns. I am really happy with it.
    My quilting group makes quilt blocks for donation quilts and they are always with 8 inch blocks so this software is perfect for sizing not only quilts but blocks.

  25. #25

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    There's another book that is really good too. It's called "Taking the Math Out of Making Patchwork Quilts" by Bonnie Leman & Judy Martin. The ISBN # is 0-9602970-3-0. It gives you standard measurements for different mattresses, etc., helps calculate sashing for straight sets, and calculates how much fabric squares, rectangles, and isosceles right triangles, hexagons, etc. take. It even tells you when to use each chart.!! In all, it has a lot of info for planning quilts. So it would answer the question about reducing the overall size of a pattern. Hope this helps.
    Virginia

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