Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 26

Thread: Seems too risky to me.

  1. #1
    Senior Member Quiltlady330's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    712

    Seems too risky to me.

    In almost 40 years of quilting I have never quilted a project of any size either by hand or machine without basting it first. I use either safety pins, basting spray, needle and thread, or tacking gun. Several ladies in our local group tell me they never baste when they put it in a square free-standing quilting frame. They pin around the edge of the quilt and they begin quilting on all sides at once and not in the middle out as I'd been taught and always practiced.

    Just curious what your experience has been with this type of procedure. I'm concerned because we are doing a very
    special quilt for auction and I want it to be completed well without puckers or pleats on the back. It seems to me that we're really taking a chance on this happening when we don't baste. Am I being overly concerned about this?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Hinterland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    943
    From what you're describing, it sounds like they have the whole quilt set out in a frame, and wrapping the finished quilt around the end poles? That's the way quilts used to be framed up for hand quilting. It's not done much any more because who has the space to keep a full size quilt stretched out until the quilting is finished.

    I'd trust what they say if they've done it before without incident. It sounds like it would be loads of fun to work on the quilt - an old fashioned quilting bee.

    Janet

  3. #3
    Senior Member Hinterland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    943
    And come to think of it, I don't baste my quilts either - I use a 3 pole quilt frame. At the most, I'll pin some sections to make sure the backing doesn't get pulled in the wrong direction.

    Janet

  4. #4
    Senior Member Quiltlady330's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    712
    My longarm frame has the extra poles to keep you from basting and everything shifting, but this frame is just like the frames they used to use...4 boards like a picture frame. I have just read another post about this same procedure being used that I described so maybe a lot of people don't baste. When I use my standing quilt frame I baste it and then roll both sides in and start in the middle even when others are quilting with me. We roll out from the middle. Maybe it doesn't really make a difference. These ladies have only seen it done by their relatives. They haven't experienced it yet but they think I'm foolish to baste.

  5. #5
    Super Member AshleyR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    1,099
    Blog Entries
    30
    I don't baste when I hand quilt either. The frame holds it all together and there's no need to. I use clips, clamps or clothes pins to hold the edges together
    You can have any design you want. As long as it's loops!

  6. #6
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    2,306
    Quiltlady330, This is the way we have always done the quilts at church and we just tie them. No puckers allowed and it is so much easier. The batting is put on the frame and secured on all 4 sides then the batting is smoothed over then the top is put on and we usually pin around the edges. Then we all start in a spot on one of the edges and gave a 'quilting bee'. Depending on the number of gals and size of quilts we have been known to get 7 or 8 done in a 3 hours. Not a wrinkle in the bunch either.... Good luck!

  7. #7
    Senior Member Nancy Ingham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Shipshewana, IN
    Posts
    791
    Blog Entries
    3
    When I visited my Amish friend's home she had a king-sized quilt secured on all four sides in a large rack that they could sit 12-13 women around to quilt. The rack holds the quilt in place without the need for pins, basting, etc.
    You can choose to live your live as though nothing is a miracle; or as though everything is a miracle!

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Firmly North Georgia
    Posts
    838
    Everything invented these days is a substitute for putting a quilt in the frame, hand quilting around the outside and rolling to the middle. Pay close attention. These ladies probably learned from the masters and once they're gone, we'll all be poorer.
    Life is made up of bits and pieces. You won't know how it'll turn out till its done.

  9. #9
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    11,929
    Blog Entries
    1
    That's the "old-fashioned" way of doing it quilting-bee fashion. No basting required because of the frame.

  10. #10
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    28,589
    I always basted and hand quilted from the center out. I didn't have a frame.
    Now I only machine quilt and I pin the sandwich every 3-4 inches. I just use a regular sewing machine with a 9" throat.I hope the quilt turns out well.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  11. #11
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    29,862
    Yes, it sounds like the old fashioned floor frame. The quilt back is secured to the long poles on the top and bottom. The batt is layed on top while it is fully extended. The top is then pinned in place on the top of the sandwich. When everything is flat and secured the side poles are attached by bolts or clamps and the whole square quilt is taut. Everyone sits around the edge and as a section is finished, the quilt is rolled around the bars to allow access to the center of the quilt. It works great and if you have a lot of people quilting, the quilting can go quite quickly.
    Since most people don't have the room to leave a full size frame out, this type of quilting is disappearing. Today most people hand bast their quilts before putting them in a hoop to hand quilt themselves. There is nothing as great as a floor frame and a good old fashioned quilting bee!

  12. #12
    Super Member Rose L's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Nebraska..The Good Life
    Posts
    2,142
    Blog Entries
    1
    This is basically how a long arm frame works too. The layers are lined up and pinned at the top, the sides are smoothed across from side to side. Some stitch down the sides to hold the layers, I prefer to pin with safety pins. As the quilting is done the all of the layers are moved at the same time onto the top roller and you progress towards the bottom of the quilt. As long as everything is smooth and taut starting out and the edges are basted or pinned in some manner, nothing moves and there are no tucks or wrinkles when finished. It's the same principal as taping the layers to the floor and then starting at one edge to baste.
    Janome D1822/Janome 4618LE/1946 Singer 15-91 in original cabinet
    Bailey 17 Pro/Grace Original GMQ Frame with No-Flex carriage upgrade

  13. #13
    Junior Member cad_queen_2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    soutwestern ontario
    Posts
    141
    does it look sort of like this? this is how our senior ladies put a quilt together. we have never had a problem with puckers or folds. they have done it this way for years, and they will probably do it this way forever. lol.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #14
    Super Member justflyingin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Jozefow, Poland
    Posts
    4,502
    Quote Originally Posted by cad_queen_2000 View Post
    does it look sort of like this? this is how our senior ladies put a quilt together. we have never had a problem with puckers or folds. they have done it this way for years, and they will probably do it this way forever. lol.
    with such a setup, basting seems totally unnecessary. You work with it flat and it is flat to start with and several people are working on it at the same time...seems ideal!

  15. #15
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    9,749
    I vote for basting. I have had a negative experience when I did not bste. LOL Talking pleats. Blehhh!
    Anna Quilts

  16. #16
    Super Member 117becca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    dayton OH
    Posts
    1,878
    I have a smaller - 24x36 rectangular frame and I baste prior to putting a quilt in there because i noticed that the quilts seemed to shift as i quilted and my corners always came out wonky. I always start in the middle and work my way out. When I baste the quilt (I use thread, like it better than pins) my quilt doesn't shift and my corners remain square.

    The quilting groups i work w/ all have the frames that you roll the quilt on - we don't baste those.
    my name is becca and i'm a quilt-a-holic :-)

  17. #17
    Senior Member Kat Sews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    646
    Don't baste for a large floor frame. In the process of putting the quilt on the frame each layer is pulled taunt and fastened to the frame. If basted first the basting will pull unevenly causing tucks and wrinkles at best and could cause holes to tear in the quilt

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    402
    i quilt with a group at the community center and we don't baste. We use wooden poles with fabric on them to which we tightly pin backing, then spread out the batting and the quilt top then baste them to the fabric, roll once then we quilt from the outside in coming from all sides at once. no puckers or bad stitches allowed since the quilts are sewn on commission for other quilters. each quilter gets a personal quilt done as well according to how much time they volunteer to quilt others.

  19. #19
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Prescott Valley, AZ
    Posts
    1,329
    When I was a child I went to quilting bees with women who were born in the 1800s. The method they taught was to stretch the back, batting, and top on a 4 sided frame, then roll 2 (opposite) sides toward the center. The women would line up on those 2 sides and start quilting from the center out. As a section was finished the quilt would be unrolled, restretched, and the quilting started again from where they left off. They did beautiful work.
    Shirley in Arizona

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    555
    Quote Originally Posted by Quiltlady330 View Post
    In almost 40 years of quilting I have never quilted a project of any size either by hand or machine without basting it first. I use either safety pins, basting spray, needle and thread, or tacking gun. Several ladies in our local group tell me they never baste when they put it in a square free-standing quilting frame. They pin around the edge of the quilt and they begin quilting on all sides at once and not in the middle out as I'd been taught and always practiced.

    Just curious what your experience has been with this type of procedure. I'm concerned because we are doing a very
    special quilt for auction and I want it to be completed well without puckers or pleats on the back. It seems to me that we're really taking a chance on this happening when we don't baste. Am I being overly concerned about this?
    I don't use a frame unless it's a round hand held one. I always baste like you do. I haven't had any problems yet. I don't think I would want to take it apart and redo it, so I will continue to baste. And I always start in the middle too.
    Let peace begin with me and you.

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Marengo, Iowa
    Posts
    801
    Blog Entries
    1
    My grandma quilted constantly in a large frame. I know she didn't baste, but she did start in the middle and work out. Never saw a pucker. I know if I tried it, it would be a catastrophe
    When life goes to pieces, make quilts.

  22. #22
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    36
    The old quilting frame works the best for keeping the fabrics taunt while quilting. I learned how to do this at my church quilt guild years ago. It was most fun and I enjoyed it very much. I wish I had a group like that again. Hand quilting is beautiful. We seem to have lost that way..now its all done alone so it is a different process.

  23. #23
    Super Member AshleyR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    1,099
    Blog Entries
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by Barb1949 View Post
    The old quilting frame works the best for keeping the fabrics taunt while quilting. I learned how to do this at my church quilt guild years ago. It was most fun and I enjoyed it very much. I wish I had a group like that again. Hand quilting is beautiful. We seem to have lost that way..now its all done alone so it is a different process.
    I agree 100%. I learned the same way! I moved away from the church that had the bee.. I was told there's a bee not far from my house, but they do it at while I'm at work
    You can have any design you want. As long as it's loops!

  24. #24
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    1,282
    I belong to a handquilting bee and we have our quilts machine basted by a longarm quilting then attach it to a board on 2 sides so that it can be rolled as we work. The other two sides are pinned to another set of boards when we set it up each week. Before we started using a longarm quilter for basting we hand basted it before starting to quilt. Since we take it down and set it up again each week basting seems to help keep everything in place.

    mltquilt

  25. #25
    Junior Member Donna in Mo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Clark, MO
    Posts
    225
    When my youngest daughter was going to get married, she wanted a double wedding ring quilt. So I had an Amish neighbor piece it. Then I had a quilting at my house and invited my Amish friends. They put the quilt in a square frame made out of boards. It was completely stretched out and secured to the boards, with no basting. They started quilting on all sides, meeting in the middle. Starting about 9:30 am, they had the quilt out by 3:30 pm. We all had a great time. The quilt was beautiful. such good friends and neighbors.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.