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Thread: Serger?

  1. #1
    Super Member michelehuston's Avatar
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    I know this may sound a little strange, but I have never used a serger but am considering purchasing one. My questions are this, can anyone please tell me pros and cons of sergers. Im not necessarily looking at brands at the moment, just if this would even be a good investment. I only make quilts..not clothes (yuck!) Any input from you will be greatly appreciated!! Thanks in advance! :-D

  2. #2
    Super Member sewwhat85's Avatar
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    if all you make is quilts i would not get a serger

  3. #3
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    I am not sure you would use it enough for it to be a "good investment". If you decide to purchase one, I would be sure it is easy to thread.

  4. #4
    Super Member scowlkat's Avatar
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    If you only make quilts, I second the opinion that you don't need one. Although there are some quilts made by serger, it is very limited and not worth the investment just for that.

    For clothing, a serger is invaluable though.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Tootsie's Avatar
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    I've seen many nice quilts made with a serger, and have done one myself. Here are some patterns to give you an idea:

    http://www.sewvac1.com/Library/Quilt...structions.pdf
    http://www.lindaleeoriginals.com/spatterns.htm
    http://www.babylock.com/ftp/projects...er%20Quilt.pdf
    http://www.husqvarnaviking.com/ca/en...r_Quilting.pdf

    Also, a serger is great if doing charity quilts, as they can be made very quickly.

    Some pros:
    •Quick, especially when using a quilt-as-you-go method
    •Works well on simple shapes
    *Fun!

    Cons:
    •Seams are bulkier
    •Seam width can vary (instead of all being 1/4" )
    •Ripping out stitches is time consuming.

    I would purchase a serger with coverstitch and chain stitch capability for more versatility.

  6. #6
    Super Member cherylynne's Avatar
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    My mom just bought a book on making quilts with a serger. It's a quilt as you go type of technique. Book was written by Nancy Zeiman and it's a newer publication.

  7. #7
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    I used my surger all the time when they boys were small. Made all their pjs, t-shirts and sweat shirts. Loved the finish edges. Have a bernina 2someting DC. Now that I quilt, I RARELY use it unless I have to edge fraying towels.

  8. #8
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    I don't think a serger would be your best investment if you just quilt. Just MHO

  9. #9
    Senior Member kathidahl's Avatar
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    I am a HUGE proponent of having a serger....BUT..if you are only going to quilt, it would be a poor choice. The only caveat is if you are going to do some of the serger quilting that Sewing with Nancy is now showing. And you better make a lot of those to justify the machine. A serger is a necessity for me, but I do a lot more than quilt. One more thing...you need an easy to thread machine and that likely means a Babylock, which is not the cheapest machine on the market.

  10. #10
    Super Member michelehuston's Avatar
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    Thank you all so much. I will definately take your advice and put it on the back burner. :)

  11. #11
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    sergers are one of those machines that are (mostly) used when garment sewing and or working with knits. if all you do is quilting i would save the $$ for something quilting related. I bought a serger 5 or 6 years ago...it sat around in it's case...we used it once for about 1/2 an hour, i finally just sold it, it was of no use to me and i never did learn how to actually use it to it's potential. maybe you could visit a sewing machine shop where they would let you try one out and see what you can do then decide if it's something you would use

  12. #12
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    Sergers are fantastic if you plan on making clothes, but if all you make are quilts I wouldn't get one. I've read that some people have used them in quilting, but I would think that all the threads would add to the bulk of the seam, in my opinion.

  13. #13
    Super Member hobbykat1955's Avatar
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    I bought Cheap one "White" on sale for 199.00 a few yrs back. Took me over a yr to take it out of the box...I use it to finish edges on the quilt and sometimes use it for piecing instead of using sewing machine...I only quilt so for the price it was I have gotten my money out of it.

  14. #14
    Super Member 4girlsmimi's Avatar
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    I have a serger because my mother gave me her old one. Would I have ever purchased one? Probably not unless I made mostly clothes. I rarely ever use it. Guess it depends on what kind of sewing you do. My daughter loves hers, but she makes clothes for her little girls.

  15. #15
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    It is kind of funny. Most say don't use it for quilting. I made a quilt for someone who picked out her own fabric. I learned that lesson the hard way. Anyway, one of the fabrics, I have no idea what the content was. I ended up having to serge every seam that that I had sewn to keep it from falling apart. Every time you looked at it this fabric it had raveled a little more. On this quilt it was a life saver, but normally I would not have had to to do this. I always have to learn my lessons the hard way.

  16. #16
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
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    Sergers have come a long way. My first one nearly drove me crazy. I have since purchased and used a lower end Bernina and in the last couple of years traded up to a more expensive Bernina. The major improvement is in the threading. My first and second machines had to be threaded in just the right order or they would not work. My newest one doesn't have that problem. I use mine now mostly to make Linus Quilts. Over the years I have sewn lots of household items and even clothing for myself and my daughter and grandchildren. If you purchase one don't worry about spending extra money to get one with a chainstitch. You can get the same results with a sewing machine using a double needle. The seam done on the sewing machine will not totally unravel if you pull the wrong thread. If you ever had a hem come out of a T shirt you will know what I mean. If you examine most readymade clothing it for the most part totally constructed with a serger. I don't know if I am lazy or just super efficient but I prefer to not have to take apart any machine I am working with just to do another procedure. That is why I spent the extra money for a built in rolled hem on my serger and now own two stand alone embroidery machines. I have been known to be running both embroidery machines while using my sewing machine and doing certain steps in the project on my serger. I made 14 banner type wallhangings as gifts for members of my family this past Christmas that I used all of my machines to construct from the embroidered motifs to the hanging sleeves.

  17. #17
    Super Member LivelyLady's Avatar
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    I got my Brother serger years ago when I was sewing garments. I do use it sometimes for "quilt as go" to make charity quilts. I use it when I sew long strips together and I use it to finish off fleece blankets. The only other time I use it is when I prewash fabric(which I do only when color bleeding is questionable) then I serge around the edges of the fabric. So for the few uses if I didn't already have one, I wouldn't go out and buy one. I'd use the money for more fabric :)

  18. #18
    KandiKane's Avatar
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    I love my Serger, I can do just about anything with it , I have a
    4 spool, but I can use a 2 spool, I love the Quilts you can make, table runners , potholders, and much more.. I bought my Brother brand 3 years ago, I shopped around looking at many I thought this one was the best I could afford, the Bernina is the best , but quite more money..you can go in any Fabric store that sells them and pic up information on them , Like I said I shopped around, most Fabric stores are trying to sell you what they have , but I just asked questions first.. some stores will let you try them out , I did that also..good luck

  19. #19
    qnana's Avatar
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    I have been researching for weeks, and decided today on purchasing a Janome 204D. It is basic, and all I think I need to learn on. I have Janome 6600P sewing machine and a 350E embroidery and love both of them. They are sooo impressive. I wanted the serger to edge fabric as I prewash all my quilt fabric and am tired of it fraying; esp. flannel. Also with grands I like to make jammies and blankets to drag about. Pillows, couch covers, curtains, edges on large embroidery for patches, exploring quilts,...on and on. Besides, we can't let the men win in the who has the most machines contest! ( :

  20. #20
    Super Member michelehuston's Avatar
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    oohh. You so have a point. Men do seem to win in the tool department. Why should they have all the fun. :lol:

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