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Thread: Serger thread in domestic sewing machine

  1. #1
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    Serger thread in domestic sewing machine

    Can I use serger thread in my domestic sewing machine?

  2. #2
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    Yes. Tweak your tension, if necessary, and off you go!

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    I do all the time--check strength of thread first. I use one of those serger thread holders, put in back of machine and thread machine--no problems.

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    I have for years, never noticed any difference.

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    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    Seems to me thread made for serging is not as strong as piecing thread because you use three or more together in a serger so multiple threads made the seam strong. I met a few quilters who think all cone thread is serger thread because that was how it use to be sold. There were no cones of piecing thread available in the stores only serger thread.
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    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I just started using it for free motion quilting, and did a search and found that lots of people use it, if it works in their machines. It seems strong enough to me and I clean my machine regularly enough that I don't notice lint. If it even makes lint.
    Alyce

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    I don't, because when I look at the strands of serger thread that I have, they are not even. There are thick, strong parts and then there are very thin parts. I don't have any confidence in it holding for any extended period.

    I really like Glide for quilting. It is strong, seems to have very little lint and the biggest thing....my older Nolting likes it.
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    I do all the time for piecing, with big cones of neutral colors. I buy thread far less than before!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barb in Louisiana View Post
    I don't, because when I look at the strands of serger thread that I have, they are not even. There are thick, strong parts and then there are very thin parts. I don't have any confidence in it holding for any extended period.
    I agree, Barb. I don't use serger thread for piecing either because of the low quality of the thread and the inconsistency of them. Also, most serger thread seems to be awfully linty and I hate linty thread.
    Patrice S

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  10. #10
    Senior Member Queenbarbiej's Avatar
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    I use serger thread for piecing only. For fmq I am 100 percent cotton all the way. I find with fmq serger or all purpose thread has a tendency to break quite often.

  11. #11
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    What exactly is everyone calling serger thread? Good serger thread is 40 wt 2 ply. Much to thick for piecing. It is very cheap on Superior website for their brand of serger thread. Serger thread is cheaper for a reason.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
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    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
    Seems to me thread made for serging is not as strong as piecing thread because you use three or more together in a serger so multiple threads made the seam strong.
    Yes, you use three or four threads for serging but but one or two of those threads are straight, just as in regular sewing. Two threads make the loops and the others just hold the loops in place. If those straight threads break, all the loops fall apart. I don't see that happening. I use serger thread all the time.

    Yes, it is two ply, but so are some other threads that are sold as sewing thread.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  13. #13
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I guess it turns out to be personal preference for the process and results. I have a lot of different threads, not "married" to one brand or weight. I'll use whatever works best on a project in my machine. So far nothing has fallen apart (and I even press seams open!) and I really don't expect my quilts to be around in a hundred years. I heard a presentation by a YLI thread representative a few years ago and she said use what you like that works in your machine.
    Alyce

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    I once bought some Wooly Nylon serger thread...for my serger. It is a super stretchy thread that is made for knit fabrics. For things like t shirts & leggings, sweat pants etc.
    One day I decided to try it out (on my domestic machine....Not the longarm) on some fmq. I used a knit needle, and loosened the tension a bit. After messing with it for a while (I had to put a spool net on the cone), it was so fun. I had it in several colors, and it added a texture that was so unexpected and cute. After practice & play, I did a whimsical bird & picket fence & flowers wall hanging. It also made cute butterflies & bees.
    I don't think I will use serger thread for construction, but it's great for decoration. It works well when couching yarn or ribbon, etc. too.

  15. #15
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    Yes, it is two ply, but so are some other threads that are sold as sewing thread.
    But it is 40 wt. Way to thick for piecing.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  16. #16
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    I always use serger thread on all of my machines and have never had a problem. I agree with Stitchnripper. It is a matter of personal preference.

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    I’ve also used it with a little guilt....and feel better about it now. Once upon a time I owned a costume business. I have so many colors of thread due to being anal about proper colors onthe serger. Great news to me...and away I’ll go!��

  18. #18
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    I have used it, but it is not as strong as regular thread. I quilted a quilt for myself many years ago. After a while the thread started popping creating toe catchers. I would not trust it. When you are using a serger, you are using 2 or more threads at a time.

  19. #19
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    Only can report my experience - that some colours are too thick for piecing or are too weak and snap. I was given a whole box of thread that turned out to be overlocker thread and just for an experiment, I tried it in my HQ Sweet 16. The machine did not like it one bit and I don't like all the lint.

    HettyB

  20. #20
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    I use it all the time on my domestic machine, and I use MaxiLock cones on my long arm. It works better than some of the more expensive threads I have purchased.

  21. #21
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    I use 40 wt thread all the time for piecing - never knew it was suppose to be too thick. I've just started using some 50wt and will admit it's sure nicer having the bobbin not go empty as fast, but don't find it's made a noticeable difference other than that.

    I use the same thread in my serger as my other machines - but I don't buy the stretchy type stuff either.
    My name is Cathy - and I'm addicted to old sewing machines and their attachments.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
    But it is 40 wt. Way to thick for piecing.
    I've never seen a weight mark on a serger cone, but it is not thick thread. It is very thin.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

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