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serger thread

Old 08-08-2022, 01:54 PM
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can serger thread be used in regular sewing on domestic machine
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Old 08-08-2022, 04:12 PM
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The serger thread I have is not a consistent weave, whereas sewing thread is. The serger thread varies in thickness. It works in a serger because you are using multiple threads all at the same time and all the threads support the seam. I don't think it would do that well for standard sewing, but I could be wrong.

Edited to add: When I Googled the question, some answers were Yes, and some were No. I'd sew a seam or two with it and pull on them to see if the thread holds up and looks good. If it does, then go for it. They did say that some sewing machines would do well with it and others wouldn't.

Last edited by Barb in Louisiana; 08-08-2022 at 04:16 PM.
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Old 08-08-2022, 07:31 PM
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Yes, it can be used in a regular machine. It's made differently than other sewing threads. Serger thread is strands that are twisted together, where other threads have a core that is wrapped. I know that if you use a very hot iron (on a cotton setting) to press serger thread, it will melt, and your seams will fall apart. So use a polyester setting when you press it. When I serge an item, instead of burying the tails, I just melt them with a candle. I have used Maxilock in my longarm, and know Kathy Barlow of Kathy Quilts mostly uses Maxilock in her longarm. I've discovered that it's stronger than I thought.

Not all serger thread is the same. Maxilock is the best. I've seen Guterman serger thread twist so badly, it forms a loop, just before it goes through the tension disks, and causes a hick-up. I've serviced sergers that had terrible thread on it, and we couldn't get a good stitch no matter what we did. Then put Maxilock on the same machine, and it worked like magic.
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Old 08-09-2022, 06:44 AM
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I agree, the answer really depends on the serger thread you are using. I would start by going to the manufacturer's website and looking to see what it actually is recommended for. That is a place to start. You can try breaking it just to see how much force it takes. Back in the day, I bought some of the "more economical" serger thread which was so easy to break. Nope, I would not use that. For my serger, I prefer to use regular quilting thread that the manufacturer says can also be used for serging. That way, I can keep less types of thread on hand.
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Old 08-09-2022, 07:13 AM
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I use it for FMQ and have had no issues with it. My
machine isnít fussy and neither am I
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Old 08-11-2022, 04:22 AM
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I have used it a lot over the years, never had a problem.
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Old 08-11-2022, 11:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Barb in Louisiana View Post
The serger thread I have is not a consistent weave, whereas sewing thread is. The serger thread varies in thickness. It works in a serger because you are using multiple threads all at the same time and all the threads support the seam. I don't think it would do that well for standard sewing, but I could be wrong.

Edited to add: When I Googled the question, some answers were Yes, and some were No. I'd sew a seam or two with it and pull on them to see if the thread holds up and looks good. If it does, then go for it. They did say that some sewing machines would do well with it and others wouldn't.
My serger thread continued to bunch up on the front of the needle and then break. Therefore it has been banished to the hand sewing thread bin. Put regular thread on the machine and it worked perfectly so my guess would be No. At least it did not for me.
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Old 08-12-2022, 04:58 AM
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I do like to use a good quality thread that will hold up. I made one quilt for my nephew that stitch up fine. But, after a few washings, the quilting thread started to break, and break, and break. Nope, I will not use a poor-quality thread anymore, learned my lesson. After that quilt, I stepped my quality and haven't had a quilt fall apart since (well, if you don't count my sister's flannel quilt that started to fray and split seams after 20 plus years of daily use and many, many, washings.
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