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Thread: Sewing Machine in the Junk Pile

  1. #1
    grayma's Avatar
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    My husband is not a junker! But he was at this guy's house and saw an old Singer in the junk pile. He told the guy to not pitch it until he spoke with me. We went today and picked the poor thing up. I figure if people can take old rust buckets and make them into shiny vintage cars, we can do this, too. From the S/N (G7462571) it appears to be a model 15, made around September 1919. He won't bring it into the house until he is sure that all the vermin are out of it. I started printing Lostn51's instructions for taking it apart, but ran out of ink. I will take pictures of the before. I sure hope we can do this!

  2. #2
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    Yes, I would love to see pictures.

  3. #3
    dd
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    Super Member dd's Avatar
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    Good luck. Can't wait to see the pics. You're right, they do this on TV all the time. You can do this too.

  4. #4
    Super Member luvstitches's Avatar
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    I really love vintage sewing machines and have many of them.
    Please post a picture before and after...would love to see it.
    Good luck!

  5. #5
    Super Member PegD's Avatar
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    Congrats on your find. I know you can do this.

  6. #6
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    Congratulations please take pictures before and after

  7. #7
    Power Poster CarrieAnne's Avatar
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    congrats!

  8. #8
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    If you run into any issues just let me know and I will try to walk you through them. Yes it is fun taking an old machine and making it new again and believe me it is cheaper than cars and easier to hide them!!

    Billy

  9. #9
    Power Poster dkabasketlady's Avatar
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    Good luck on your find and the restoration of it!! I'm looking forward to the pics!

  10. #10
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    Congrats! You can do it. Love to see before and after pics.

  11. #11
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    Looking forward to seeing pictures.

  12. #12
    Super Member Celeste's Avatar
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    Picture? :D

  13. #13
    Member mcpatches's Avatar
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    Could you post a link to the instructions for dismanteling and cleaning you mentioned? I just got a model 15, too and need info on cleaning it up. Thanks in advance.

  14. #14
    grayma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcpatches
    Could you post a link to the instructions for dismanteling and cleaning you mentioned? I just got a model 15, too and need info on cleaning it up. Thanks in advance.
    Do a search on this board for cleaning vintage machines. There is three parts, disassembly, cleaning and a third part. It is by Lostn51. It is in the tutorials section. Good luck with your machine! We are still in the stage of finding replacement parts.

  15. #15
    Super Member M.I.Late's Avatar
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    Oh - I'm sure you can! How exciting. What a wonderful project for the two of you. My DH and I love doing stuff like this, though they are far and few between.

  16. #16
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Be sure you absolutely need to take it everything clear apart before you dis-assemble. Here is a link to a video that shows how to clean it up. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bidpJ..._order&list=UL Muv is a member in England and there are more videos on her Utube. She does a wonderful job of fixing up her machines. All her principles apply to your machine. I recommend dis-assembling one section/part at a time rather than taking the whole machine down to bare bones for a complete kerosene soak unless you are planning to repaint the machine. It is a lot easier to re-assemble, too. There are repair manuals and owner manuals to help you with the details. Feel free to join us on the Vintage Sewing Machine Shop http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-43881-1.htm or just browse the vintage sewing machine section of this board http://www.quiltingboard.com/virtual...jsp?vsnum=1013

  17. #17
    Super Member wvdek's Avatar
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    If you follow Lostin51's instructions, you will have a beautiful machine afterward.

    You will be amazed where dirt and junk are caked on.

    Yuk! You need to get it out of every nook and cranny so the machine will function at it's best.

    Many on here have done just that and are grateful for the time he took to do the tut. You will be too.

  18. #18
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    'Clear instructions on how to clean and oil a vintage sewing machine. Make sure you watch Part 2 for the end result. Provided the machine is not rusty and not damaged this is a straightforward job you can do at home using very basic equipment. Use metal polish on all the steel and chrome, but take care not to get the metal polish on the japanned areas or decals. The decals can wear off if you use chemicals, so they are best cleaned with a little sewing machine oil on cotton wool. This is a Singer 28K dating from 1900, so it is worth the effort.'

    I quote from Muv's video write up. I watched all 9 videos she took the time to make. Very good information and yes, you can consider what she does a nice deep clean. If the machine is totally rusted out that is a different matter. I seriously doubt if the average person wants to dis-assemble the entire machine all at once and put it in kerosene soak. This can be achieved in smaller segments and the kerosene or the rust remover can be 'painted' on multiple times until it frees up a section of machine at a time. Much easier to re-assemble.

    With the aid of a good manual it can be done a section of machine at a time.

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