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Thread: Side Triangles

  1. #1
    Super Member Watson's Avatar
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    Side Triangles

    Is there a reason that you can't just cut a regular block in half to make side triangles for an on point quilt?
    Will this not work?

    Thanks, Watson

  2. #2
    Super Member Lilrain's Avatar
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    Puts bias on the outside which can cause distortion.

  3. #3
    Super Member Krisb's Avatar
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    You would be missing the seam allowance, and the outside of the quilt would be on the bias, which may result in edges that won't stay square.

    Bonnie Hunter has a cool chart

    http://quiltville.blogspot.com/2005/...nt-quilts.html
    I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it difficult to plan the day.

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  4. #4
    Super Member liking quilting's Avatar
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    Krisb,
    Thanks for the link to the that chart. That's one worth saving for future reference.
    Mavis

  5. #5
    Super Member Watson's Avatar
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    Right...missing the seam allowance. Of course.

    Thanks,

    Watson

  6. #6
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
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    It would be too small and you'd have to chop off points on adjacent blocks in order to square the quilt.

  7. #7
    Super Member Watson's Avatar
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    The reason I ask is that I have fabric left but it's not in a big enough piece to cut the way they say in those directions where you cut a large square and then cut it diagonally into 4 side triangles so I was wondering what size each triangle ended up if the finished size of the blocks was 9"...anyone know?
    I'd like to use up these pieces of fabric for side triangles if possible.

    Thanks, Watson

  8. #8
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    Yes, take finished size of block, add 7/8" cut diagonal. This should fit the side triangle areas, and add 1 3/4" and cut diagonal twice for corner. I would cut these out of scrap fabric to make sure of fit. I usually add a bit to these sizes and trim down to fit. And yes you will have bias but if you handle the edges carefully and control the stretch, the quilt will ok.

  9. #9
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    Or, make your own pattern. Draw finished size of block, cut diagonal, add seam allowance to the 1/2 or triangle. And cut individual side triangles using the pattern.

  10. #10
    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    Draw one out of paper so you can measure the triangle. You can use your fabric with squares cut in half once, just starch the dickens out of it. Make the fabric as stiff as card stock. Then once your triangles are on the quilt sew a stay stitch around the perimeter until you can your outer border sewn on or it is quilted.

    If you are just short of your fabric you still have options. You can sew strips to the bottom of your triangles to enlarge them. Edited to add, this will give the effect of a narrow inner border that your blocks are floating out into. I've seen pics of this technique and it looked good but I can't remember if the quilt was sashed or not. It may look odd with sashing.

    Another option is to save your fabric for the binding or a narrow border and use a different fabric for your setting triangles.

    It seems to me if you don't have enough fabric for the larger square cut twice, I suspect you will still be short for making the triangles with the bias edge on the outside.
    Last edited by feline fanatic; 05-09-2017 at 05:23 AM.

  11. #11
    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quilt30 View Post
    Yes, take finished size of block, add 7/8" cut diagonal. This should fit the side triangle areas, and add 1 3/4" and cut diagonal twice for corner. I would cut these out of scrap fabric to make sure of fit. I usually add a bit to these sizes and trim down to fit. And yes you will have bias but if you handle the edges carefully and control the stretch, the quilt will ok.
    I would add 1" so I don't cut off any points of the blocks. 7/8 is the bare minimum.

  12. #12
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    Bias can be a problem, but, more important is that you don't allow for a seam allowance when you cut a block in half.

  13. #13
    Power Poster Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krisb View Post
    You would be missing the seam allowance, and the outside of the quilt would be on the bias, which may result in edges that won't stay square.

    Bonnie Hunter has a cool chart

    http://quiltville.blogspot.com/2005/...nt-quilts.html
    Yes this! I have no problems having the bias edges, just spray the fabric stiff before cutting and handle with care.
    Anna Quilts

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quilt30 View Post
    Or, make your own pattern. Draw finished size of block, cut diagonal, add seam allowance to the 1/2 or triangle. And cut individual side triangles using the pattern.
    There is no law that says one "has to" cut the setting triangles from a larger square.

    If you are unsure of whether not you have enough fabric to accomplish what you want, you can draw the triangles on the back of the fabric and count them to see if you have enough.

    If using the cut triangles from square method - I always add a bit and trim later. My units ALWAYS end up skimpy when I cut the "exact" square size.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krisb View Post
    You would be missing the seam allowance, and the outside of the quilt would be on the bias, which may result in edges that won't stay square. Bonnie Hunter has a cool chart
    http://quiltville.blogspot.com/2005/...nt-quilts.html
    That is a nice chart, but Jan from VA has a chart with pictures that is easy to understand without all the reading. I hope someone can find it and post it here.

    Quilt 30 and feline fanatic have some good ideas. I would use both of them.

    If your fabric is the wrong shape, make a pattern as suggested. Then if you really need to cut some of those side triangles with the bias on the long side, do the starch thing and then stay stitch the bias side. I would do the stay-stitching right away, not wait until it is sewn onto the quilt.

    I doesn't hurt to add a little extra on these. Ask me how I know.

    When I trim those edges, I lay my ruler from point to point and cut the side triangle 1/4 inch from those points to leave just that much seam allowance.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  16. #16
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    Or, you can cut your regular block (square) on the bias then cut that in half diagonally. That puts the bias on the sewn edges instead of the outside edges. Your original square block does have to be larger. I just measure one side of the triangle you need, plus 1/2 inch for seam alowances and make the bias square that size. Then cut that in half. you could try it first with scraps.
    Last edited by mindless; 05-10-2017 at 11:34 AM.

  17. #17
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    heavy starching stops the stretching, but I would add a thin piece of hem tape or stay tape to that bias edge at the start of sewing to hold the bias in shape. If your triangle is too small, get creative and add some fabric, and make it look like part of the original quilt plan.

  18. #18
    Super Member Watson's Avatar
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    I think I'll just buy some more fabric and do the square cut method. Sounds a lot less dangerous than trying to fudge it.
    This extra fabric can go back in my stash.

    Watson

  19. #19
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    I bought the large Set In Triangle ruler from Quilt in a Day. So easy to use. Perfect for squaring corners of quilt tops too. https://www.quiltinaday.com/shoponline/ruler/30855
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jane Quilter View Post
    heavy starching stops the stretching, but I would add a thin piece of hem tape or stay tape to that bias edge at the start of sewing to hold the bias in shape.
    Good idea!
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

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