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Thread: Sizing spray

  1. #1

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    Kathy Stuart
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    I was told to be sure to use sizing spray. Is that the same as spray starch? When do I use the spray, after block is complete or before I sew pieces? Not sure, looking for your expertise.

  2. #2
    Suz
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    Sizing spray just gives the fabric body. Starch makes the fabric stiffer and therefore, easier to handle.
    When using spray starch, spray on the back of the fabric as it will leave a white residue, showing up particularly on darker fabrics. Guess this is why I prefer sizing.
    Sprays can be used once you have laundered your fabrics before cutting. Use it in place of a spritz of water. And anyone working with minatures, spray starch is a must.
    Suzanne

  3. #3
    Sis
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    So when I pre-wash fabric for quilting it is usually to set the color and/or for shrinkage and not necessarily to remove the sizing?

  4. #4
    Suz
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    Sis,
    Yes, you are assuming correctly.
    Since you appear to be a new quilter, may I also suggest the following: if your piece of fabric is one yard or less, once you have completed your pressing, fold you fabric with the selvages together. Fold your fabric twice (or once if it is a fat quarter), then lengthwise resulting in a neat stash pile. Now the problem will be to keep your piles neat. This is often a problem for me.
    By folding in this manner, you will most always be cutting in the same direction (selvage to selvage). If you attempt to stretch your fabric you will find more stretch selvage to selvage vs. lengthwise. When stitching then, try to keep the "stretches" in the same direction. By doing this you will have fewer problems with one piece pushing along and getting longer. Hope this helps. Suzanne

  5. #5

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    Thanks Suz, I will try this. You are right about storing the fat quarters. My inventory is so big right now, I am trying to make scrap quilts like crazy just to reduce the stock, but I am finding the folds (done many ways from the different folks I have bought from) are creating some of my problems. I always press before I cut, so will add the starch then. I checked 2 fabric stores (JoAnn and Hancock) and still have not found sizing. If you know where to find it, that would be great. Thanks again, I love this new site!
    Kathy

  6. #6
    Super Member Yvonne's Avatar
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    Kathy,
    I found my can of sizing at the Dollar Store. I've also found it in the grocery store on the laundry aisle right next to the spray starch. The sizing makes the fabric feel like it did before you laundered it. Hope this helps just a little.

  7. #7
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    Kathy, WalMart has it also next to the spray starch it's called Magic Sizing. I bought a can but haven't had a chance to use it yet.
    Kathy

  8. #8

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    Hi,

    I am new to this but love to read what you write. I have used Magic Sizing for years on our clothes. It is easier, I think, to use on my husband's shirts and makes them look fresh for the office. I have heard that we should never store fabric items for long periods of time with starch in them but I don't know about storing them with sizing on them. I heard on "Simply Quilts" that Sizing is a totally different product, but not being a chemist I don't know how it is different.

    Wanda

  9. #9
    Super Member Yvonne's Avatar
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    It seems that I heard the wee little buggies like to eat starch. Has anyone else heard that? Sizing doesn't have the same properties and apparently the bugs leave it alone. (That's if I remember correctly which is not at all certain!) :roll:

  10. #10

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    Thanks, Yvonne, for your input. I'll remember that. I like to wash my fabrics when I first get them, then iron and put them up.

    Have a good day!

    Wanda :)

  11. #11
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    Well I used my sizing last night. It does make the fabric nice and crisp, it cuts easier and the edges don't seem to fray as quickly. I have never starched my fabric for quilting so it may feel and work the same but I will always use sizing now. I have also heard that some kind of bugs (silverfish I think ) are attracted to starch. So am I.. potatoes, bread, cake,cookies ........................ and so on. LOL
    kathy

  12. #12

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    Hi , just to add a little more about the starch question. I always use spray starch on my fabric before cutting and some times in the block assembly process as well. I don't think the sizing keeps the fabric stiff unough for me. For a beginer I warn them to never cut or sew a triangle with bias edges with out having starched the fabric first. It keeps the bias from streching and when you are pressing seams to go a certain direction for assembly it really keeps them where you want them to be. As for the bug question I have heard that the old fashion starch that grandma used by cooking up water and corn starch was what attracted the bugs. I have never had a problem with the new stuff in the can and have used it for many years.

  13. #13
    Suz
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    Regarding the bugs: I'll get my can and see if there is an 800 number and give the manufacturer a call. Not today, on Monday and see what they have to say. Suzanne

  14. #14
    Super Member Yvonne's Avatar
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    http://www.equilters.com/library/tips-hows/starch1.html

    I just googled "spray starch and bugs" and this site came up. Wow! Lots of comments on using starch on quilt projects and some on bugs, silver fish.

    These are comments by quilters and goes right along with this topic.

    Okay, I've got to go read some more but was excited when I found this. Love to see what others are saying.

  15. #15
    Super Member Knot Sew's Avatar
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    I read through it and most use it and caution about bugs. I think it boils down to,If you are going to store your quilt make it as c hemical free as possible.
    I have just started pre washing and hadn't given thought to the backing.I am using a sheet this time and will starch if needed
    Thank you , that was interesting

  16. #16

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    Hey Kathy, you sure did get a lot of replies from one little question. I am new to this site as of a few minutes ago, and browsing it has been such fun....I personally LOVE to use sizing, especially with small size fabrics which are used in Paper Piecing patterns...they are so crisp and much easier to work with. I live in Hawaii and have trouble with the high humidity...makes the material "limp" ......anybody else have this problem... and solutions for them? Aloha, Carol

  17. #17
    Crickett Sweet's Avatar
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    Please forgive me if this sounds rude but why on earth would you pay what we do for nice fabric and go to all the work of making a quilt top only to back it with a bedsheet! Even if you have to piece the back (which l prefer), It will look so mich nicer and last so much longer. Your efforts need to be showcased = front and back.

  18. #18
    Suz
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    Crickett,
    I think your respose is in the wrong thread. This one is on sizing spray.

    However, I do agree with you. I would never use a sheet for backing. I prefer to either piece or have a print on the back of my quilts. Suzanne

  19. #19
    Crickett Sweet's Avatar
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    I understand your correcting me Suz. However, i was responding to
    Ruth Camp who said she was using a sheet for backing her quilt. She did say this in the Sizing/Spray starch discussion area. I should have directed my response to her specifically.

  20. #20
    Super Member mpeters1200's Avatar
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    Sizing spray and spray starch are not the same. If you want sizing, I would use "Magic Sizing". I don't use starch. But sizing is easy to use. I did a "Block of the Month" type thing with a quilt shop. The fabric was really thin and I had a hard time piecing with it. After I added the sizing, it was much firmer and easier to use; without having a paper like quality to it as you'll find with spray starch.

  21. #21
    Super Member mpeters1200's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpeters1200
    Sizing spray and spray starch are not the same. If you want sizing, I would use "Magic Sizing". I don't use starch. But sizing is easy to use. I did a "Block of the Month" type thing with a quilt shop. The fabric was really thin and I had a hard time piecing with it. After I added the sizing, it was much firmer and easier to use; without having a paper like quality to it as you'll find with spray starch.
    Loretta, I'm so glad you bumped this up. Wow have things changed in two years. I never buy sizing anymore. All I use is starch on just about every fabric. I can never tell which ones I'm going to cut into triangles and which I'm not so I starch it all.

    Tooo FUNNY

  22. #22
    Super Member Margie's Avatar
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    BUMP???? I have seen this before what does it mean? lol

    Margie

  23. #23
    Super Member mpeters1200's Avatar
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    Bump means....

    This is an old thread that we talked about a while ago. Sometimes, a member finds an older thread really good and might provide someone with info so we "bump" it up to the front.

    That way, the thread gets "bumped" to the front page where everyone can see it.

    M

  24. #24
    Super Member Margie's Avatar
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    Thanks....I had noticed this several times before and wondered....finally decided to ASK lol

    Margie :)

  25. #25
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    re: sizing vs. starch


    with starch you can make it thin or thick to suit your own needs. i like a heavy starch so my pieces can get up and walk by themselves, but if you like a 'sized' quality you can mix liquid starch thinner.

    a really heavy starch is 50/50. more water = thinner starch. less water = thicker starch.

    i also like the liquid because i hate to run out. i can always make more.

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