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Thread: Small Ironing Surface and Larger Fusible Web Project

  1. #1
    Super Member Boston1954's Avatar
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    Small Ironing Surface and Larger Fusible Web Project

    I would like to finish a wall hanging kit by McKenna Ryan. It is not huge, however I have a very small ironing board that just sits on the table. If I spread some batting (Warm and Natural) across my table will it act like an ironing surface? I am so worried that the tiny pieces will shift while I am trying to secure them to the background that I am afraid to proceed to the next step. The instructions sound as though all the pieces are to be fused at the same time.

    Usually I do fusing in layers. Could I do this now? If you have made McKenna's projects would you do this? I have had this kit for several years now and would like to get it done.
    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake. - Anne L. Fulton

    I am from the South....39 miles south of Boston.

  2. #2
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    What kind of table do you have? That might make a difference.

    You might need multiple layers of 100% batting with a piece of fabric like duck fabric covering it to make it safe to use on your table. If you have a few old towels you can use instead of batting, that would probably work, too. Use painters tape to secure them in place at the edges of the table, with most of the tape placed under the table. Duck tape would work well for temporarily securing the ironing pad to the table, but the glue may be difficult to get off of the table.

    Alternatively, go out and buy a piece of plywood and have it cut the size you want it. Cover it with several layers of batting and a nice heavy weight, iron-able fabric and secure the batting and fabric in place. Make sure the back of it will not scratch the table - maybe put a piece of fabric over it, too. Put it on the table, use it and then put it in storage for the next time you need it. Of course, that assumes you have a place to store it.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  3. #3
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    You might end up damaging your table if it's wood. If you need a large area, I might see if I could a couple of large sheets of cardboard. You could lay them down first and put the batt on top for extra protection. You also need to think about if you are dry ironing or steam. If using steam, it may go through the batt and cardboard and ruin wood.

  4. #4
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
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    I would definitely "press" (not iron) the pieces one or two at a time. I press all of my quilts on a 16 x 24 Steady Betty pad.
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  5. #5
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I would use a towel, or maybe a flat sheet folded in quarters. If you have a surface you'd like to protect from heat and steam, definitely use more layers.

    Make sure to use parchment paper, also, to prevent fusible from getting on your surfaces.

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    If you make a quilting surface with a board, you don't want but one layer of batting. It needs to be firm. Too much batting makes it too soft for good pressing.
    Pat

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  7. #7
    Super Member soccertxi's Avatar
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    how about getting a piece of masonite or wood that would fit on your dining table? Have it cut, add some knobs or feet to the bottom to keep it from scuffing up your table. staple a layer of batting and a top layer. I have used ironing board fabric (the silver stuff), cute novelty fabric but my fav is white or off white cotton duck. You can store it behind a door or under a bed. A handle that is not as deep as the feet would make it easier to pick up.
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  8. #8
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    I have an old wool blanket that I bought at a garage sale the I put over my tables doubled and iron on it when I need a larger ironing surface and it works fine. You may need more than one layer to protect your table.
    Patrice S

  9. #9
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    ANd if you're not using steam you should be ok. I you have a flat cookie sheet, you can place your iron on it by placinghe cookie or baking pan upside down so the iron can rest on it.
    Quote Originally Posted by cashs_mom View Post
    I have an old wool blanket that I bought at a garage sale the I put over my tables doubled and iron on it when I need a larger ironing surface and it works fine. You may need more than one layer to protect your table.

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    I use a silicone pastry mat with a layer of felt over it directly on my wood table and have not had any harm to my dining table.

    of course, this mat was purchased for this reason and pastry has never touched it.
    Last edited by marjben; 07-11-2017 at 10:46 AM.

  11. #11
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    I'm working on a McKenna Ryan wall hanging today, too. Mine has chickadees; I am assembling them separately in layers, so I'm just fusing a couple pieces at a time. Then I will transfer the fused groups to the main background. I definitely find the piecewise approach easier than trying to get it all laid out at once.

  12. #12
    Super Member Boston1954's Avatar
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    Thanks for the helpful suggestions. The table is (I think) a wood veneer, one of those six foot deals with the legs that bend down like the big white plastic ones they make now. Since this is a one time thing, I am hoping to avoid going out to buy a special setup. Maybe I will have to go over the instructions of what goes first, again. I appreciate your input. I just do not want to mess this up as the kit was pricey.
    Last edited by Boston1954; 07-11-2017 at 01:55 PM.
    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake. - Anne L. Fulton

    I am from the South....39 miles south of Boston.

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    That's why I suggested putting fabric on the back of the ironing surface, too.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  14. #14
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston1954 View Post
    Thanks for the helpful suggestions. The table is (I think) a wood veneer, one of those six foot deals with the legs that bend down like the big white plastic ones they make now. Since this is a one time thing, I am hoping to avoid going out to buy a special setup. Maybe I will have to go over the instructions of what goes first, again. I appreciate your input. I just do not want to mess this up as the kit was pricey.
    That's the type of table I have. If you aren't using much steam, a double layer of blanket or thick batting should be okay. Those tables a really pretty durable.
    Patrice S

  15. #15
    Super Member petthefabric's Avatar
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    I have 3 stacked towels folded up in my traveling quilter tote. They help with padding my machine and extension cords. I don't use steam. As far as a wood table, I'd put a plastic table cloth on it then the towels on top.

  16. #16
    KLO
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    I have made several McKenna Ryan tops. If you are using Steam-A-Seam Lite II (or similar) then you should be able to hand press the pieces on and they should stay until ready to iron. If something is in the wrong place, you can lift it off (assuming you have ironed the pattern to the fabric for that piece and not to the main background yet) and move it where it needs to be. I have found also that walking away from the quilt top and coming back to look at it later before the final fusing helps to pick up any mistakes you may have made in placement. As previously mentioned, you should be pressing not ironing. Press down for 15 or so seconds then lift the iron, move it to the next area, and press down again with the iron. So, which Ryan design are you working on? I seem to love most of what she designs.

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    No help with the kit part of your question but I just use folded towels on top of my cutting table to iron all the time. I have one of the tables with the legs that fold under and the sides fold down. It is made of (I believe) masonite. It came with a (very) thin piece of foam and the silver ironing cover. Had more damage from that set up than my towels (none).

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    Quote Originally Posted by PatPitter View Post
    If you make a quilting surface with a board, you don't want but one layer of batting. It needs to be firm. Too much batting makes it too soft for good pressing.
    This is what I think is correct. I heard of one person putting multiple layers of batt on an ironing board. One layer is enough. You want it firm and flat.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  19. #19
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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    When I was working on her owl quilt I fused the owls etc. on an appliqué sheet into a unit, but for the branches and grasses, they were built directly on the background. I have a big board so can't really add anymore to others comments about your pressing area. (although... if you had a large wooden dresser drawer, maybe you could pull it out and use the bottom of it, if it doesn't have any hardware on it, just put a towel over it? )

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by thimblebug6000 View Post
    When I was working on her owl quilt I fused the owls etc. on an appliqué sheet into a unit, but for the branches and grasses, they were built directly on the background. I have a big board so can't really add anymore to others comments about your pressing area. (although... if you had a large wooden dresser drawer, maybe you could pull it out and use the bottom of it, if it doesn't have any hardware on it, just put a towel over it? )
    Now that's being innovative. Use what you have, and some things are in unlikely places.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  21. #21
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    I'm not too sure about what you are doing. I put the parchment paper over the placement guide (so I can see the lines through the parchment paper). Since it is non-stick, I use pins or staple it so there is no movement. Then I iron the pieces in place where they belong moving the who unit as needed. When everything is fused I peel it up and put it onto a background. If needed, you can always trace the placement guide and use it on top of the background material to place the fused pieces.
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    Debbie
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  22. #22
    Super Member Boston1954's Avatar
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    Thanks for all of your input everyone. Applique - your dog is looking terrific. The project I have is the one with the two otters playing in the water. I am going to go back and look at the picture again, and really study. I love this piece and hope to show you a picture one day soon.
    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake. - Anne L. Fulton

    I am from the South....39 miles south of Boston.

  23. #23
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    I have made that one and it wasn't hard to fuse the units. If it is not a kit (with limited fabric), you can always enlarge the pieces and the the placement guide to make it larger and easier to do. Making it bigger is also easier to stitch down. Have fun and ask questions if you have them.
    Debbie
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