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Old 04-11-2014, 06:12 AM
  #1  
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Default Snowball

I have often tried the snowball block and just can't get it right. Is there an easy way that I'm missing? I really could use some help. Thank you all you great quilters.
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Old 04-11-2014, 06:21 AM
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It might look like an easy block but you have to be able to stitch that line right down the center accurately. Have you tried drawing a center line? I always stitch on the side of the line (towards the corner of the block) so that I don't lose when pressing the seam. Another way I do them is to actually press the square in half, then position it into the corner, glue the triangle into position with glue-stick and the stitch along the pressed seam.
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Old 04-11-2014, 06:28 AM
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I will try the glue stick idea and stitching just off the line. They always end up too small. Would it help to cut the little squares just a tad bigger?
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Old 04-11-2014, 06:34 AM
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There is an easier way of doing it and I can explain it. I am just not sure I can do a good job in the absence of pictures, but I will try. 1. Take two strips of fabric 2.5" wide by width of the fabric (WOF). 2. Take one strip of fabric 5" wide by WOF. 3. Stitch the three strips side by side with the wide strip in the center. 4. Fold it into half (RST), so that the wider strip has a crease all along its length. 5. Now stitch the folded fabric, such that you have the crease on the left and the two identical strips are on the right, making sure that the right sides are together. Now, the magic begins. Use your 45 degree triangle ruler and cut out triangles. If you are familiar with the tube technique, you know what I am talking about. Once you are done cutting, you should get the snowball block. You will also get the other block, where the fabrics will be reversed - you can get creative with these bonus blocks. Give it a try and send me a PM if you still have questions.
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Old 04-11-2014, 06:39 AM
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You need to sew just on the other side of the line, towards the center of the block. Don't cut the extra out until you have finger pressed the triangle into place. If the triangle is good, cut all extra layers, if it's just a tiny bit short, leave the large block fabric and just cut the extra corner fabric. The main fabric will ensure the block is square and will trap the slightly smaller piece in the seam making it secure.
You certainly can cut the small square larger, but you need to mark the actual target triangle size on it, not mark corner to corner.
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Old 04-11-2014, 06:43 AM
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I've been setting the corner square just inside the outer square - a thread or two at the most. This has the same effect as sewing inside the line. I don't draw lines because I have a fancy laser guide, so this method has been working for me. Picked it up from Deb Tucker's wing clipper tutorial.
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Old 04-11-2014, 07:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Preeti View Post
There is an easier way of doing it and I can explain it. I am just not sure I can do a good job in the absence of pictures, but I will try. 1. Take two strips of fabric 2.5" wide by width of the fabric (WOF). 2. Take one strip of fabric 5" wide by WOF. 3. Stitch the three strips side by side with the wide strip in the center. 4. Fold it into half (RST), so that the wider strip has a crease all along its length. 5. Now stitch the folded fabric, such that you have the crease on the left and the two identical strips are on the right, making sure that the right sides are together. Now, the magic begins. Use your 45 degree triangle ruler and cut out triangles. If you are familiar with the tube technique, you know what I am talking about. Once you are done cutting, you should get the snowball block. You will also get the other block, where the fabrics will be reversed - you can get creative with these bonus blocks. Give it a try and send me a PM if you still have questions.
Not sure I get this, but I appreciate you sharing it!
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Old 04-11-2014, 07:27 AM
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I use the Folded Corner Clipper and love it. No pencil lines and no dog ears to trim.
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Old 04-11-2014, 10:05 AM
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I always do my Snowball blocks by sewing the diagonal on a square placed on each corner. When you draw the diagonal line, think of that as your fold line not your sewing line. Sew just a smidgen outside that line so when you fold back the fabric your corner it goes to the edge.
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Old 04-11-2014, 11:17 AM
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I'm off to try some of these tips. Wish me luck and thanks to each of you.
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