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Thread: Something to keep nervous hands busy

  1. #26
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    I think it is a great idea, but since it is meant to be therapeutic, I agree with most on the board, you should consult a professional, such as his teacher, who works with him. Who knows maybe they are working on him to be less obsessive about this habit and this might just reinforce his old pattern. Best wishes to you and your family.

  2. #27
    Super Member Caswews's Avatar
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    I agree with Jan in VA .. whatever helps him out ..
    When Life brings big winds of change that almost blows you over.Hang on tight and Believe.
    Words and hearts should be handled with care-for words when spoken and hearts when broken are the hardest things to repair. Author unknown to me
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  3. #28
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    My 11-year-old granddaughter is autistic. She has her little spells when she just has to walk, so she goes into another room and walks and talks to herself. When she feels better, she comes out. I think yours sounds like a good idea for him. Do it.

  4. #29
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    What about having him make some of those tied fleece blankets where you cut in a few inches ever inch all around and tie the ends? Just a thought....I like your idea too for a smaller project.

  5. #30
    Senior Member countrymaid's Avatar
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    My son is 21 and he's a pacer and talks to himself. A wonderful man told me once, "Mom, when it's right you'll know it and until then keep searching". Make a square with threads and tell him what it's for and that you'll make as many as he wants. He might even want to help pick the colors. He picks at his clothes because that's what's always avalible to him. This would be a substitute that's ok to pick at. It's about self modification and helping to make good choices. We're still working at it and will for a long time to come and it's ok because we're still making progress.
    countrymaid- I clean up after the kids, the husband and the farm animals

  6. #31
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    Maybe he picks at the loose end because it drives him nuts and he can't stand to have the loose thread and he's trying to get rid of it?
    (I don't know about him - I just know for myself that a stray dangling thread really bothers me)

  7. #32
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    Try it. If it works, that will be wonderful, if it doesn't it won't have hurt anything. froggyintexas

  8. #33
    Senior Member 2blackcats's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhonda View Post
    It doesn't make him nervous but is an obsession. I am sure. My DGS has obsessions too. He is autistic and 11.
    If this helps your stepson calm himself I think the hotpads with threads to pull out is an excellent idea.

    We have to find ways to help them cope with their everyday life. Obsessions are just a part of the package. We learn to channel them so they are manageable and I think you are onto something for your stepson.

    fortunately my DGS has left some obsessions behind as in running to whatever catches his attention. And he is no longer obsessed with slides. now he is obsessed with printing off Wiggles pics on You tube and writing stories around them. The laptop and drawing keeps him busy for hours. He is bound and determined to make his own movie! He has always been obessed with movies and tv shows and the behind the scenes info as in what studio makes that program and who the sponsors are and what ads are shown on there. He could one day become a director who knows??
    I have seen DGS before and don't know what it means. Can someone please tell this dummy?

  9. #34
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    @ 2 blackcats, it simply means darling grandson.

  10. #35
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    Having worked with many children with similar problems, I think your idea is great. I also think that keeping one of these "fidget bags" made up and in reserve would be a really good idea. You are a wonderful Mom to this special child. Blessings.
    Donna
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltMania View Post
    That would be a very good idea. You could also try this: Sew 2 small squares together like you would if you were making a pillow (felt works well for this). Leave 1 side open and turn to the right side. Tuck about 1/4 of the open side over so you won't have raw edges for the next step. Starting at the open side, sew a curvy line throughout the square. Move over about 7/8 inch or so and sew another curvy line following the path of the line you just sewed. Basically, you are making a track. You can make it as simple or complex as you want. The track should start and end at the open side. Drop a marble into the track. Topstitch the open side closed. Now you have a small "fidget" for your stepson to take with him. To use it, he just moves the marble back and forth along the track. I have seen this work well with many of the autistic kids I work with.

  11. #36
    Senior Member LoriMcc's Avatar
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    As a teacher of special needs children, including Autism, I think this is a great idea! In fact, I think I will make some for my classroom! Thanks! You are a thoughtful mom!!!
    Lori McC

  12. #37
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    I know nothing about autistic children, but I wonder if something like the "fiddle" quilts I made for Alzheimer's patients at our local nursing hone might be appropriate. I made a lap quilt out of fabrics of different textures and added pockets to put things in, a button that could be buttoned and unbuttened, some velcro, and a zipper to zip and unzip. I even added a string of spools (like beads). I didn't use actual beads because they could be swallowed if the cord broke. Just an idea.
    Happy quilting Grandma

  13. #38
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    Blessings to you and son.

  14. #39
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    Betty Ruth, I love your idea of fiddle quilts. My good friend just had to place his mother in a nursing home with Alzheimer's. He sold me her like new serger for a very good price and he said he had a lot of fabric he had brought home from her house in Colorado. I intend to purchase any usable fabric from him and had the idea of making some quilts for her and other patients in the nursing home. Your ""fiddle" quilt ideas sound so creative. I can't wait to give it a try.
    When a dying man asked his pastor "How long does it take to die?" his pastor's heartfelt reply was "A lifetime." Live life to the fullest, but stop now and then to enjoy the sunset.
    Lynda

  15. #40
    Super Member d.rickman's Avatar
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    I have made fidgety blankets for persons with dimenthia, all it is small blanket made from fleece, you can attach various pieces of fabric, pockets with snaps to open and close the pocket, zippers that they can fiddle with, buttons that he can undo and do up, I have also added wool that has been braided, short ribbons that can be threaded thru like shoe laces, and a variety of other things can be done to his blanket to keep him occupied and engaged for some time. You would clip the edges of the blanket to make a fringe, and then run a stitching line around to keep it from being torn. (You could visit your local second hand shop and pick up shirts with pockets, some with zippers, some with snaps, some with buttons, and just stitch these pockets onto the blanket). Stitch elastic about 3 inches long, and attach a small stuffed animal to the elastic, put a small hole in the blanket and then they can push the stuffy thru the hole from the front and the back of the blanket.....and probably there is a variety of other things you can think of.
    Quilting People are the Best, Have a great sewing day!
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  16. #41
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Betty Ruth View Post
    I know nothing about autistic children, but I wonder if something like the "fiddle" quilts I made for Alzheimer's patients at our local nursing hone might be appropriate. I made a lap quilt out of fabrics of different textures and added pockets to put things in, a button that could be buttoned and unbuttened, some velcro, and a zipper to zip and unzip. I even added a string of spools (like beads). I didn't use actual beads because they could be swallowed if the cord broke. Just an idea.
    the fidget blankets are good for autistic kids. But what I understand is that this young man needs something pocket sized that he can keep with him all the time. A quilt won't cut it in math class.
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