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Thread: Spray Basting

  1. #1
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    Spray Basting

    Please share all your knowledge of spray basting a quilt. I have done some safety pin basting as well as basting with the basting gun in the past. I like the basting gun, but find that I spend as much time getting the little plastic pins unstuck from the gun as I do basting. When you are on the floor, that gets old quick.

    The instructions on the basting spray is scary. It is winter here so outside use is not an option. Should I place a sheet over hardwood floor, before spraying? Do you have a favorite brand? I am afraid Walmart was my only selection today, but if this works out I can try other brands.

    Thanks!
    Lisa

  2. #2
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    I open a window (even in the winter) and would definitely cover a hardwood floor.
    I prefer 505 basting spray because some of the others really gummed up my needle.
    Remember that you just need a light spray and I have found it really helps to iron both sides and then let it sit over night before I start quilting.
    I stick a few pins in just to help hold it while I'm pushing it around quilting.
    Once you get a system to your work it goes well but it seemed like such a big thing the first couple of times I tried it (once outside on the snow covered deck- bad idea).
    -good luck

  3. #3
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    You may want to check this thread for a home made one.

    https://www.quiltingboard.com/links-...g-t297188.html

    I plan to try the recipe in the near future.

  4. #4
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    It takes awhile to get used to the right amount of spray, I think most people start out with way too much. I try and be about 12" above the fabric, or basically one forearm high and spray lightly. You do want to be ready to quilt within a couple of days of putting it together, it doesn't last forever. You can adjust the fabric as you put it down, simply lift and move if needed.

    I used cheap flannel covered vinyl tablecloths to protect my floors/table/bed (whatever I laid out the quilt on), give yourself plenty of room for overspray. Buy them from the dollar store. We have several reptiles (as well as dogs and cats) and I always opened doors/windows when I sprayed.

    When I started and used too much spray, it took about 2 weeks for it to mostly dissolve. Yes, it gummed up my needle and stuck threads to the outside even after washing. Now I'm pretty good after about 3 days. I had to put in some time between getting done and giving the quilts because of this, especially for baby quilts.

  5. #5
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I haven't used that particular spray. Of the ones I have tried, I prefer 505.

    Definitely protect your floor with a sheet. You can toss the sheet in the laundry. Can't do that with a floor!

    It's a good idea to let your quilt sandwich dry for 24 hours before sewing. Although I don't have to do that with 505, some sprays do need that drying time in order not to gum up your needle.

    Here is a good tutorial on the process. It helps to mark centers on all sides before layering (folds make a good mark, as do pins) so each layer is lined up with the preceding layer. Also it is important to fold back layers and spray only a section at a time. Here is the link with good photos:
    http://thecraftyquilter.com/2012/03/...te-your-quilt/

    Edit: I see she doesn't protect her hardwood floor. That's because she knows to always spray from the side towards the center. If you use a sheet as a protector, I would tape the corners to the floor to prevent it shifting while you work. Painter's tape is very good - non-damaging and will not leave adhesive behind (as long as you don't leave it in place for months).
    Last edited by Prism99; 11-15-2018 at 01:43 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Queenbarbiej's Avatar
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    I've used the homemade basting spray. It works wonderfully. Your house will smell like rubbing alcohol for a while. depending on how heavy you spray it on. I mixed a 32 ounce bottle of it and it was enough for me to spray the front and back of a 80x96 quilt and the back of a 95x95 quilt. I like it much better than pinning. Word of warning, if you use the homemade spray and then iron it dry it might be hard to reposition the quilt on the batting. Make sure you use plastic on the floor for over spray.

  7. #7
    Senior Member DawnFurlong's Avatar
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    Would love to have the recipe for the homemade basting spray!

    I also prefer 505 spray. I do lay down a sheet to catch any over spray from the edges. I tried one other brand years ago and it gummed up my needle.

    I've gotten more judicious of how much to spray. I have at times taken several weeks to finish my quilting, without any issues. My favorite way to baste!

    I think trying it on a small quilt (or even an oversized quilt sandwich) would help with becoming comfortable and having trust that it really does hold.
    Dawn

  8. #8
    Super Member jmoore's Avatar
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    I have a designated sheet that I use over and over...505 does the job for me. I haven’t been able to find in in the larger cans for quite some time.
    attitude is everything...the rest will fall into place.

  9. #9
    Senior Member DawnFurlong's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmoore View Post
    I have a designated sheet that I use over and over...505 does the job for me. I haven’t been able to find in in the larger cans for quite some time.
    Locally, the same with me (smaller cans only). But I thought I recently saw on Amazon the bigger cans. I need to search again, because would definitely like to have the bigger cans.
    Dawn

  10. #10
    Senior Member Kwiltr's Avatar
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    If you have a railing or clothesline, or fence outdoors and hadn’t thought of it, you can hang your pieces and spray them. When they are too big, I just fold them right sides together and spray and flip. On my railing I just throw an old sheet over it first to protect the quilt from picking up dirt and the railing from the spray, that the rain will eventually wash off. Ironing your quilt sandwich afterwards sets the glue, even though it is still repositionable, but also highlights areas where you may have a potential pucker and can straighten it out. Iron front then back. 505 is also my spray of choice. Have never had an issue with gummed up needle with it. Joann’s online is where I bought my spray in large cans when on sale.

  11. #11
    Super Member meyert's Avatar
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    I love 505 spray. I have opened the window and there were times that I have not opened the window. Usually my batting is larger than my quilt top and backing so I don't worry about the overspray - the batting catches it. Just spread everything on my floor. Often I have to move my table and chairs to make room

    I don't spray baste much at all anymore. I can't get myself to spend the money on it. I use elmers glue

  12. #12
    Senior Member jokir44's Avatar
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    I've tried the homemade basting spray and would like to caution that it does not work well on poly batts. While it is sooo much cheaper you must iron it dry.Takes forever for me! watch the videos to see how heavily it is sprayed. The shop owner is very good to answer any questions you may have about it. I think I'm going to try 505 spraying on the wall for my next quilt.

  13. #13
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    The last quilt I spray basted was large (65 x 90+) and I used this system which was posted here in another thread about spray basting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPaI...ature=youtu.be It saves you having to crawl around on the floor. The room with my big cutting table has carpet so I did put sheets down over the carpet. It worked very well.

    I use 505 spray.
    Patrice S

    Bernina Artista 180, Singer 301a, Featherweight Centennial, Rocketeer, Juki 2200 QVP Mini, White 1964 Featherweight

  14. #14
    Super Member Watson's Avatar
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    I usually just put newspaper down.

    I use 505 and I've got quilts that were spray basted 3 years ago that I pullout and work on and they are still staying together perfectly well.

    I usually let it dry 24 hours before I start sewing. I spray the bat, not the fabric. (Not sure sure why, just how I've always done it.)

    Watson

  15. #15
    Super Member jillmc's Avatar
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    I prefer 505 as well. I used a new to me brand on my current project, and it did not work very well. I contacted customer service, and I was told it was because I am using wool batting! Never had a problem with 505 and wool. She also told me that I need to “ keep my project in a large ziplock bag after spraying if I am working on it for a few days”....I have never done that-is this a usual way of working with spray basting?

  16. #16
    Senior Member DawnFurlong's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jillmc View Post
    She also told me that I need to “ keep my project in a large ziplock bag after spraying if I am working on it for a few days”....I have never done that-is this a usual way of working with spray basting?
    I have never done that with 505. And I had one larger quilt that I took a number of weeks to complete. I had no issues. In between quilting sessions, I did not leave the quilt scrunched up under my machine (as it was when I was quilting), but I often left it under the needle, I just straightened it up on the tables I had around me and the machine.
    Dawn

  17. #17
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    I use 505 all the time, indoors, windows closed, no floor protection. Spray from the outside in all the way around. I do not have sensitivities, so have no problems with it at all.

  18. #18
    Super Member LoriEl's Avatar
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    I recently used the Elmer's school glue method for the first time and I love it! I find it much easier and cheaper than the spray. I also think it works better, plus there is no smell.

  19. #19
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    DeltaMS I've tried Quilt Basting Spray by June Taylor and Dritz Basting Spray from Wal-mart. This time I purchased a can of Dritz Quilting Spray Adhesive from JoAnn Fabric. It cost $17.99, but I had a 50% off coupon, so it was worth it. I like this one the best as it, as the can states, is odorless, colorless, stainless and acid free and it won't gum up the needle. It is great for hand quilting, machine quilting, applique', machine embroidery. I would have to say I like this one the best of all.

  20. #20
    Super Member WMUTeach's Avatar
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    I have been using a product from JoAnn's for at least 7 or 8 years. I get it with my 40% or 50% coupon. At my store it is not in the quilting area but back in the notions area but it is clearly marked for quilting. There is a similar product for crafting, so be sure you pick up the one with the sewing machine on the label. It doesn't have any odor, so there is no reason to open up windows. It does not gum up the needle unless I use too much and I have spray basted quilts and let them site for several months and they were still ready for the machine. I can get three large throws from a can and perhaps a baby quilt because I have learned that I don't need as much as I first thought I would. I found that spray basting with care, smoothing out all wrinkles, and layering carefully does take time, no more than pinning, but the pay off is I do not have to stop and start to remove pins. Oh, and it washes with simple soap and water.

    DeltaMS, try several types of spray over time and find the one that works for you. I found mind and it is obvious that others on the board have found theirs. This is a modern tool that really works.
    Last edited by WMUTeach; 11-17-2018 at 05:46 AM.

  21. #21
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Ventilation is recommended because you don’t want to be breathing in toxic fumes. Not everything that is odorless is harmless.

  22. #22
    Senior Member Fizzle's Avatar
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    Definitely cover. There will be overspray. It goes farther than you would guess!!!

  23. #23
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    I use Elmers wasable school glue, last quilt I did was 112×112. It worked great was easy to FMQ through and washes out. Bought it at Walmart for $10.98 a gallon.

  24. #24
    Super Member citruscountyquilter's Avatar
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    I too use washable school glue. It's economical and tidy. Hold the bottle about 6-8 inches above the batting so you get a thin stream and move the stream in a zig zag fashion. It will bead up. You don't need much. Smooth the backing over the batting with your hand. Let dry. Flip over and repeat for the top. Put the glue on the batting and not the fabric so it doesn't soak through. Wash quilt with warm water to get the glue out.

  25. #25
    Super Member Teen's Avatar
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    I use Dritz and 505 and don't have a preference...both work well. I do not do an all over spray but spray spots like you would if you were using safety pins. Saves money and works just as well. I lay out a sheet still but it's not a lot of spraying...just enough to tack down. I let sit for an hour then, sew... No gumming issues...
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