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Thread: Spray Starch Applique -- have you tried it?

  1. #1
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
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    Spray Starch Applique -- have you tried it?

    Has anyone done one of the spray starch applique methods? How successful were you and what problems did you run into?

    Here are some sited that I found:
    http://www.pieceandquilt.com/2009/11...-tutorial.html
    http://www.sewmamasew.com/2011/05/ea...m-fig-tree-co/

    Looks interesting.
    Thanks
    QuiltnLady1

    When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.

  2. #2
    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
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    I have used the 2nd method many times. My only suggestion is to use 2 layers of the freezer paper shapes. Just iron 2 pieces together before cutting the shapes so the piece is more sturdy and will last longer. I use a small stencil brush and cover my ironing board with a piece of white canvas. One other thing. Did you know that freezer paper shrinks? Before cutting it into the shapes, mist the large piece and iron it like you would a piece of fabric. You can watch it shrink up! Better than having your shape shrink! I learned this info from a class with Sharon Schamber

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    Super Member woody's Avatar
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    I use the second method a lot as well. As snipforfun said use 2 layers of freezer paper, and I also use the clover mini iron, on small pieces.
    This is an applique I am working on at the moment, I couldn't have done it without this method.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/picture...d-t201992.html
    The biggest risk is the one not taken

  4. #4
    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
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    Yes, the mini iron for those small pieces!

  5. #5
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
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    Thanks!! WOW Woody -- that quilt is beautiful!!!
    QuiltnLady1

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  6. #6
    Senior Member cindi's Avatar
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    I always use the second method and a mini-iron, too. And a stiletto or chopstick to turn the pieces. I finally learned to lay an old piece or two of muslin down on my board, because all this heavy pressing turns the board brown from the starch. I also learned that you need to cut the pieces out accurately - any little dips or nicks in the freezer paper WILL show up on your finished piece.

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    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    another vote for the second method- I too use my little clover iron for small pieces & double my freezer paper---I often cover my ironing board with parchment paper instead of canvas- but have used fabric on occasion- doesn't matter what you use- you just don't want the starch to build up on your ironing board cover- so, protect it with something.
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    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by snipforfun View Post
    ... Did you know that freezer paper shrinks? Before cutting it into the shapes, mist the large piece and iron it like you would a piece of fabric. You can watch it shrink up! Better than having your shape shrink! I learned this info from a class with Sharon Schamber
    I did not know this... thanks.
    Nancy in western NY
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    This is a good technique and thanks for sharing on the double freezer paper, I can try this out on a piece I am working on. I have been wanting to try another way aside from the raw edge, I like it, but even the very lightest weight of steam a seam leaves a slightly hard applique. Thanks.

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    Senior Member NOELLA's Avatar
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    I recently learned the second method at a quilt weekend our quilters held, love it . thanks for the tip of the shrinking freezer paper will pass it on to my quilt members.
    Going to a lunch and stitch in today.

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    I use the 2nd method - took a class from Karen Kay Buckley - she uses the heat resistant mylar plastic for templates - make once use many times (she files the edges of the template with an emery file for nails - this makes a very smooth edge.) However her method was too hard for me and I switched to the double freezer paper. I use a needle nose tweezers for holding my fabric down and use a small steam iron (Roweynta sp?travel iron)The other recommendation Buckley offered was using sizing instead of starch - it does not darken your ironing board or muck up your iron. I use magic sizing.

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    I use the 2nd method also - with the Clover iron - that way I can sit at the kitchen table, make each piece and watch TV at the same time. This process makes for some beautiful applique pieces.

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    I've used the 2nd method and it worked very well.

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    Spray Starch Applique

    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltnLady1 View Post
    Has anyone done one of the spray starch applique methods? How successful were you and what problems did you run into?

    Here are some sited that I found:
    http://www.pieceandquilt.com/2009/11...-tutorial.html
    http://www.sewmamasew.com/2011/05/ea...m-fig-tree-co/

    Looks interesting.
    Thanks

    Erin Russek has the best information about spray starch appliqué I have found on her blog One Piece at a Time.
    http://erinrussek.typepad.com/photos...ial/index.html

  15. #15
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing! I've been trying to find a better way to appliqué and this looks good!
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  16. #16
    Super Member gardnergal970's Avatar
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    I took a class from Mary Buvia and she brushs on Sew Stable glue around the edges of the freezer paper and uses the mini iron. She thinned the glue with water to about half and it still did an excellent job. It got the glue right where it was needed and not all over the project/ironing board. Probably Elmer's school glue would work too. Probably would make it difficult to attach by hand since the edges are hard. Attaching by machine with a very fine thread is almost invisible.

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    I've used Erin Russek's method and the applique came out perfect.

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    For all the newbies, this is a lot of information you wouldn't get anywhere else.

  19. #19
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    I use the second method...I use my own homemade starch and I make it really heavy, That seems to hold my pieces a lot better.

  20. #20
    Member maggiek's Avatar
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    I have also used the applique foundation paper that washes out. It is ironed onto the back of the fabric and then rather than starching or gluing down the seam allowance, I can just attach the piece with a bit of glue or pin to the background and then needleturn the fabric under the foundation. It is thick enough to make a really nice edge. Then when it is washed, the foundation just dissolves so no picking out the paper. I tried the Karen kay Buckley method and while it is precise, it is a lot of labor. This works for me and gets a good result without all the pre work.
    Maggie

  21. #21
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    I just learned something new....freezer paper shrinks. Good to know before my next appliqué project. Thanks for sharing.

  22. #22
    Super Member Emma S's Avatar
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    I use the second method to make hexies for my GFG. I've never done applique but have purchased some patterns recently, really want to get started. Your "From the heart" quilt is really an inspiration! Thank you for all the info.

  23. #23
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    I've never tried the freezer paper method, but I'm considering it on my next applique project. The method I've always used, that works for me is this: After drawing the shape on my fabric, I stitch along the line, and then I can press over the edges, just turning the fabric over the stitching. I've had good luck with this method, but I've never tried really small shapes... I go for the big stuff!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by woody View Post
    I use the second method a lot as well. As snipforfun said use 2 layers of freezer paper, and I also use the clover mini iron, on small pieces.
    This is an applique I am working on at the moment, I couldn't have done it without this method.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/picture...d-t201992.html
    Your Affairs of the Heart blocks are beautiful. I've only done 3, and I've been backbasting my blocks. I took a backbasting class and was told that I could fuse the background fabric to freezer paper (wrong side up), then run it through my ink jet printer to get the design on the back. With these small blocks, it was great not having to trace anything, and since I used a gray background instead of black, it worked out great.

    I have never used freezer paper with this method. I took a class with Karen Kay Buckley, and she uses the mylar template plastic to make templates instead of freezer paper. This is good if you are doing a lot of the same shapes, because you only have to make one template.

  25. #25
    Member happy grandma's Avatar
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    Can't wait to try this.

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