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Thread: Starch & Ironing Board

  1. #26
    Super Member piepatch's Avatar
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    I like the silver looking teflon fabric for ironing board covers. I can't remember what it is called, but Hancock's and JoAnn's carry it. I make my own covers with this fabric, and it holds up really well, and does not stain easily.

  2. #27
    Super Member AZ Jane's Avatar
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    I think the "trick"is to not burn your ironing board cover in the first place. If you are a starcher, pre-starching and waiting for the starch to penetrate the fabric is part of the process. You can choose from several methods. Just as purchasing fabric is part of the process.
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  3. #28
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    I cover my ironing board with a piece of muslin. I have two pieces for this task so when one gets soiled, I put the other one on and wash the dirty one.

    I love the freezer paper idea though. I need to use that to keep my press and cut surface 'safe' when I teach classes at church. Gr8 tip!

  4. #29
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    I cover my ironing board with a piece of muslin (large enough to cover area I will be using) when pressing starched fabric. I starch the wrong side of the fabric and press on the right after letting it "rest" until almost dry. If I see my iron getting a little discolored I keep an old washcloth that I dampened on the side and occasionally slide my iron over it. When I'm finished pressing the starched fabric, I toss the muslin in the washer. I've been using the same piece for years. It works great when I'm using school glue too-washes right out.

  5. #30
    Senior Member maxnme01's Avatar
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    Putting the starched fabric in a plastic bag (sealed) allows the starch to penetrate all of the fibers so you don't have areas without starch.
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  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by MommaDorian View Post
    How do I prevent starch from burning onto my ironing board? My ironing board covers have to replaced all the time. I'm afraid the burned colored areas will come off on my current ironing project.
    \

    When I use Starch in Quilting, I use a twin Sheet that I have had around the house. I can just wash it with when needed. That way the starch stays off the ironing board and is always clean.

    Kath

  7. #32
    Senior Member carol45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HMK View Post
    After I wash & dry my fabric I spray it with starch and put it in a plastic bag for 15 or so mins. Then when I iron, using a dry iron on the cotton setting, it doesn't leave residue on my iron or ironing board cover.
    That is a great idea! Thanks!

  8. #33
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    I do the same thing... I cover my board with a washable cloth.. generally an old mostly warn out towel.. It protect the ironing board cover and easily go into the wash...

    I make my own ironing board covers.. Not fancy, but they work great.. I have two or three and I wash them if I get in too much of a hurry to get a cover out and cover the board.

    I love spray starch and make my own from concentrate.. easy cheap and you can have it as light or heavy as you need it to be.
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  9. #34
    Super Member 1screech's Avatar
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    I made a pressing board with plywood, heavy plastic bag(to keep moisture out of wood), batting and canvas. To protect the canvas, I made a muslin pillow case type protector and when it gets dirty, I just throw it in the washer and it keeps my board clean.

  10. #35
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    What putting the fabric into a plastic bag is: It distributes the moisture evenly throughout the fabric. When I was young, my mother used a sprinkler top in a soda bottle to sprinkle the clothes the night before she was going to iron. When you picked up a piece of clothing, it was evenly dampened and ironed very smoothly.

  11. #36
    Senior Member captlynhall's Avatar
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    If it is burning, sounds like your iron is too hot. I use sizing instead of starch, but haven't noticed a problem.
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  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by MommaDorian View Post
    How do I prevent starch from burning onto my ironing board? My ironing board covers have to replaced all the time. I'm afraid the burned colored areas will come off on my current ironing project.
    i had the same problem. now i lay a piece of heavy muslin over the board when i use starch. i serge the edges first. i have 3 or 4 of these and just throw them in the wash with my towels that way i always have a fresh one on hand. i couldn't sew without lots of starch. connie

  13. #38
    Super Member burchquilts's Avatar
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    When I'm done ironing for the day, I take a rag & some 409 or amonia & water & wipe my ironing board down really well. I don't have trouble with starch burning & I use heavy starch when I iron (tho I use sizing on my quilting pieces).
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  14. #39
    Super Member JENNR8R's Avatar
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    If I want to spray large pieces of fabric, I use the tile kitchen floor. For smaller cut pieces, I have a small table next to my ironing board that I cover with an old pillowcase. I spray the small fabric pieces on the pillowcase. I never spray anything on my ironing board cover. The kitchen floor and the old pillowcase are much easier to wash.

  15. #40
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    I do the same with a piece of muslin. When it gets nasty I wash it then eventually throw it out. Much cheaper than a new cover.
    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    I bought some heavier weight white cotton broadcloth and put that on top of the ironing board cover when I used sizing/starch. (I cut it so it had about a four inch overhang all around and serged the edges

    It got nasty, but it was easy to whisk off and put in the wash.

    It was also good for protecting the ironing board cover when I had a cat that thought that was the best seat in the house!

  16. #41
    Senior Member pstrwife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lyndaloo View Post
    This may sound crazy, but I put an old terry cloth bath towel on my board when I use starch. My ironing board is very old but very sturdy and is larger than the covers they make now that are cheaper. I have to buy them through Amazon and they are not cheap. They used to make them where you could hand wash them and put them out to dry. (the pad and cloth are together) But now if you do that, they shrink to much to use again. So, I use the towel and remove it when I'm through with the starching part and want to iron the pieces I've cut from the starched fabric.
    this is what I do too.

  17. #42
    Super Member MommaDorian's Avatar
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    What is sizing?
    Dorian

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