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Thread: Stitch in the Ditch question

  1. #1
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    Stitch in the Ditch question

    So I finished my quilt top, several on here recommend to stitch in the ditch, I think I can do that, but what would I do about the sashing and border(s). Not sure how to do that. Suggestions and photos are appreciated!!!!
    Here is the quilt top - posted previously but I started a new thread since I have a specific Stitch in the ditch question.

    Terri
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  2. #2
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    If you aredoing SITD for the centre, I'd keep with that for the outside borders including the seams in the assorted fabrics in the 2nd border.

    If you don't have it there is a SITD foot, that can really help you stay ITD!
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    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
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  3. #3
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    I've done one with SID where I extended the SID into the border. I simply marked my line along the sashing and started off the border. This will work in both directions. Pretty quilt. Are you going to outline the center squares as well?

  4. #4
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    I would stitch along both sides of your sashing and along the inner squares. That's all that I would do.

  5. #5
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    When I did SITD, I stitched in every ditch and only in the ditches, even on log cabin quilts with 1" logs. However - you can do whatever you like. Skip some ditches, stitch elsewhere, all is fair game - it's your quilt.

  6. #6
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I would highly recommend doing a serpentine stitch rather than a straight stitch, using a lightweight variegated thread (such as Aurifil 50wt). For this you would be sewing lines from edge to edge, going over the seams yes, but also extending the seams into the borders. It takes more thread to do a serpentine stitch, but it is ***much*** easier to sew and the serpentine is a very forgiving stitch (unlike the straight stitch). A serpentine stitch is like a wavy straight stitch. Aside from being easy to use, I like the serpentine for the softness it gives to the quilting.

    I would do the serpentine top/bottom and side-to-side, going over each edge of the sashing. Extend the seam lines into the border by marking with a ruler and sliver of white soap, if necessary. I would also sew serpentine lines that would cover all of the edges of the inner squares. In other words, you would end up with a grid of squares all over the quilt, but they would be sewn in straight lines to cover seams. Everything is sewn in long straight lines, going from one edge to the other edge.

    There are lots of things you can do to make the process easier with a better end product. Heavily starching the backing fabric before layering is a good idea, as it greatly helps to prevent puckers. Splitting the batting into thirds reduces bulk under the arm; it would be a good idea to research this option before starting. Spray basting is better than other types of basting for this type of work, as it keeps the layers together better. Any time you are sewing a grid, you have the risk of sewing in puckers when you start crossing lines. Starch and spray basting help a lot, but you also have to be careful not to stretch the fabric out of shape as you sew. Creating a flat styrofoam surface around your sewing machine helps a lot with that (there are Youtube videos that show how to create this inexpensive table).

    If you can, it would be a good idea to make a mock-up quilt out of cheap muslin first to practice on, so you are sure of what you are doing before you tackle the quilt.

    As for SID, I had refused to do it long before I tried the serpentine stitch. I find SID very frustrating because I notice every little deviation from the seamline, plus it gives me eye strain and anxiety attacks while sewing! The serpentine stitch, on the other hand, I actually enjoy.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    Beautiful quilt, I do FMQ on my quilts. I love to do it and I like the looks of it. Just me.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    If you can, it would be a good idea to make a mock-up quilt out of cheap muslin first to practice on, so you are sure of what you are doing before you tackle the quilt.
    .
    This! I have several bed sized quilts that are fairly goofy because of my self taught machine quilting attempts. Trying the techniques out on small mock ups is really important, but even that doesn't exactly prepare you for the challenges of a bed size quilt.

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