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Thread: Store bought binding...good or bad?

  1. #26
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    Okay...stiching right in the seam would be a bad idea since my seams are pressed open.

    I can't really take all that stuff off the coffee table. Too many paper products, too little floor space. Believe me, I would of already cleared the coffee table except I don't have any place to put everything. Other than my sewing area the only real space is right in front of the bedroom door. Can't really pile the weight around the sewing machine either...working on a TV tray. Man, this... really... sucks.

    On top of all that I just discovered I'm missing almost 45 denim squares. Either I'm really bad at counting or I misplaced them. I don't think I counted wrong because I counted and recounted before I started quilting and doubled checked that I needed an x-amount of squares. But I've practically disected my room trying to look for them and so far nothing has come up. All I know is I need to find them soon because I only have enough to make two full rows...and I can get that done easy tonight. *scream* Has this happened to anyone else?

  2. #27
    Carla P's Avatar
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    Yup... Do you have dogs??? (my dogs like to claim anything smaller than them & made of cloth.

    I find quilt blocks for past projects all of the time.

    Here's an idea... Do you have another tv tray?

  3. #28
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    Nope. There hasn't been a dog in this house since Nov. '05 (I miss Buddy *sniff). And I doubt the cat would drag anything...besides, she's been spending her sweet time outside.

    Yeah, I have several TV trays. What did you have in mind? Can't place one to either side of me, though, since there's a coffee table with enough paper products to kill a tree to my left and a matress to my right.

  4. #29
    Carla P's Avatar
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    Ok then, well how about you fold them down and stack one or more on top of the paper mountain & allow the quilt to drape onto there. If they have the removable legs, take them off & stack only the tops on the table. You could even fold another quilt to lay under the tops of the trays... anything to create height for the drape to rest on. That's all...

    Where there is a will, there is a way. You're an artist, right? Be creative. And if all else fails, fake it until you make it!!


  5. #30
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    The paper mountain is...well, a paper mountain so its not level so I run the risk of knocking it over with that.

    The only thing I can think of is to take the mattress and lean it up against the wall so I can move the TV tray with the sewing machine so I can have room to place another TV tray to deal with the weight. Plus, I'll be right in front of the TV :D. But I don't like the idea of raising the mattress and putting it back every single night. Guess its back to the drawing board.

  6. #31
    Carla P's Avatar
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    Could you temporarily put the mattress on your bed for a few days? (I've seen people "store" them in this manner before) However you do it, you're on the right track to figuring out a way to get it done. Maybe you could set up in another room for a couple of days? How about the kitchen table? Maybe even a porch or patio outside? A local library or friends house? You keep considering your possibilities. You obviously want to finish this quilt for your friends, so the drive and determination are there; all of the rest are minor inconveniences to overcome.

    Did you find those other patches?

  7. #32
    Super Member vicki reno's Avatar
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    There are several ways to baste a quilt--by hand, with safety pins or basting spray. My favorite method is with basting spray which is a temporay adhesive that you spray onto both sides of the batting. I have done the other methods also. If you are using the spray, try to lay out your batting on maybe the dining room table. If it hangs over just spray the middle. Fold your quilt in thirds and lay the middle third of the quilt on the sprayed batting and smooth it out--top of the quilt only. Repeat this step for the other 2 sections of the top and then flip it over and spray the batting on the other side, say 1/3 at a time. Smooth it out too. I should hold everything in palce w/out shifting while you quilt.
    A walking foot feeds the quilt under the pressr foot in a more even fashion than a regular presser foot. It keeps the presser foot from pushing the top layer ahead of everything else--it feeds it through like I said more evenly. Is it an option to maybe set up on the dining table to sew? If you think it is heavy now, try wrestling with it once you get your "sandwich" put together of top, batting and backing. Not impossible, I don't want to worry you, but any extra support you can figure out will make it that much easier.
    Good LUck :-)

  8. #33
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carla P
    Could you temporarily put the mattress on your bed for a few days? (I've seen people "store" them in this manner before) However you do it, you're on the right track to figuring out a way to get it done. Maybe you could set up in another room for a couple of days? How about the kitchen table? Maybe even a porch or patio outside? A local library or friends house? You keep considering your possibilities. You obviously want to finish this quilt for your friends, so the drive and determination are there; all of the rest are minor inconveniences to overcome.

    Did you find those other patches?
    Um...I don't have a bed. I sleep on a mattress on the floor. No luck with the dining table either because...well, we don't have a kitchen table (hence the coffee tables and the TV trays). And I really can't set up anywhere else anyways because usually I quilt late at night when everyone else is asleep and no one can bother me (my room's on one end of the trailer so the rest of the house can't hear my sewing machine humming away). I guess dealing with the weight right now is not too bad (have to wrestle with it a little bit). But its going to be a more than just a little hassle once the batting and backing is on.

    No luck finding those other patches. I wish they'd show up because most of them are of the same dark blue color (the light colored ones have the variations in tone). I don't have anything that'd be exact to that dark blue color and using anything close will make it painfully obvious (at least to me anyways) that I ran out of the dark squares and had to improvise. Yeah, I know the quilt doesn't have to be perfect, but hey...I'm an artist. I try to go for my idea of perfection when creating works of art.


    Quote Originally Posted by vicki reno
    There are several ways to baste a quilt--by hand, with safety pins or basting spray. My favorite method is with basting spray which is a temporay adhesive that you spray onto both sides of the batting. I have done the other methods also. If you are using the spray, try to lay out your batting on maybe the dining room table. If it hangs over just spray the middle. Fold your quilt in thirds and lay the middle third of the quilt on the sprayed batting and smooth it out--top of the quilt only. Repeat this step for the other 2 sections of the top and then flip it over and spray the batting on the other side, say 1/3 at a time. Smooth it out too. I should hold everything in palce w/out shifting while you quilt.
    A walking foot feeds the quilt under the pressr foot in a more even fashion than a regular presser foot. It keeps the presser foot from pushing the top layer ahead of everything else--it feeds it through like I said more evenly. Is it an option to maybe set up on the dining table to sew? If you think it is heavy now, try wrestling with it once you get your "sandwich" put together of top, batting and backing. Not impossible, I don't want to worry you, but any extra support you can figure out will make it that much easier.
    Good LUck :-)
    This spray adhesive stuff sounds pretty sweet. But how much does it cost and can I find it at my local Wal-Mart Super Center?

    Is it going to be impossible to sandwich the quilt if I don't have the walking foot? Don't think Wal-Mart has anything like that and I doubt anyone is gonna drive me to La Crosse so I can go to Hancock's because of the recent trend in gas prices (Did someone blow up an oil rig in Iraq? Gas is like $3.14 a gallon. Geez. Well, at least the high gas prices are probably lowering the amount of drive-by shootings in the bigger cities.)

  9. #34

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    flying v g. any ways my situation is kinda like yours. but walmart does sell adhesive spray 5$ or under.i usually need about 2 cans to get a full size quilt down.believe me i sometimes have to put aside to buy my goodies. as long as you have some grass do it out side the spraying of your quilt i mean,if your room is that small you wouldnt want to do it inside any way. fumes would make you to happy if you know what i mean.do you have a clothes line you could all so try that , it must be very tight though ,i tried that once to it wasnt tight enough though.wasnt to neat looking thoughvery beautiful just not neat. f.v.g .dont let theese little things get the best of you. keep on quilting. oh yeah i have to wait right now to finish my crazy quilt so i am cutting out blue jean squares .there all diff. types of b j .and they look great together.i ve done 2 more like that and there beautiful. tia sarah

  10. #35
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    I do have some grass space outside to do it on. Might be able to do it on our small porch. Unfortunatly I don't have five dollars to buy the spray...I used whatever money I had to buy more blue jeans thread (man, that stuff sure goes fast) and as many packages of seeds I could afford (that's what mom said she wanted for M-Day). Might have to baste it the old fashioned way.

    Finally found all those fabric squares! God, I thought I was going to go crazy looking for 'em! Only thing is...I found them right after I got done cutting up a pair of jeans. I was looking for my 4.5" square template and I lifted up a couple of things from the mountain of paper...they were hiding underneath a couple of notebooks. Wish I could of found them before I cut up another pair of jeans. But at least I can finish the last four rows of the quilt top now...I should get that done by tomorrow night. :D

  11. #36
    Super Member Moonpi's Avatar
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    I'm extremely space-challenged too - I use reject masonite spread over tv tables, expanding the space as needed with the ironing board covered in dollr reject masonite from Home depot. I'm going to be putting this queen top together and was wondering if there was a way to hang it all on the clothesline to pin together . Has anyone tried that before? In theory, it should work.

  12. #37

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    If space is a problem maybe you can quilt it in parts. This means you will have to rip some seams out. Divide the quilt in 3 by 3 sections, quilt these then put them all together like a "Quilt as you go". Also adding batting is going to make this VERY heavy. You might just want to quilt the top and back together. Have you got the back fab yet, if not a nice flannel would work well. If all else fails you can always just tie them together

  13. #38
    Super Member vicki reno's Avatar
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    Basting it the old fashioned way is not bad either. If you do your work late at nite, you wouldn't want to spray in the house because of the fumes anyway. Quilting it in sections sounds like it'll be the easiest way to go. Especially because of the weight. I have not done it that way ye, but wish I had thought of it before I pieced this top together. I had to resort to handquilting the part of the top, it was too big to manuver around the small pieces on the machine.
    Good LUck! CAn't wait to see it completed.

  14. #39
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    I do have fabric for the back (went for dark blue homespun cotton). Hopefully I did my math right and got enough of it. And do you think using low-loft batting won't make it quite as heavy? I want a little weight to it, but I don't want it so heavy that it practically suffocates you.

    Oy. I really don't want to take the top apart...not since I've been working my *bleep!* off for 3-5 hours each night for over two weeks to get this thing done in time for Nick's birthday. Ripping out to yards of thread multiple times isn't exactly what I call fun. Besides...I don't have a half decent seam ripper that'll rip out all those stitches.

    I'm thinking about doing the "X" thing with sandwiching the quilt together. I'm wondering if I could just do it through the dark squares. The denim thread blends pretty well with the dark denim, but stands out against the lighter colored denim pieces, which in my head looks...unflattering. I'm just wondering if stitching X's through the dark squares will be enough to secure the quilt to the batting and back properly.

  15. #40
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    I got the quilt top done! Yay!

    ...crap, now I gotta start making it into a quilt. I'm getting a bit scared now (what if I screw up?! Ack!)

  16. #41

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    f v g i'm happy for you . now calm down , and know that you can do the rest............tia sarah

  17. #42
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    I know. I know. But I've never worked on anything this big before. I'm just worried that I'll *bleep!* up after doing all that hard work getting the quilt top finished.

    Still looking for an answer to the thing about just stitching X's through the dark square and if that'll be enough to secure the quilt.

  18. #43
    Carla P's Avatar
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    Looking at your picture of the quilt, I will say the X quilting MIGHT just be enough if you are talking about only omiting quilting in the very lightest blocks. This is a difficult answer to give without actually seeing the quilt (for me anyway) and without knowing the specific blocks you plan to skip. If it were my top, I would do all of the squares, or at least every other one on each row to maintain a "quilting" balance. (This will distribute the stregnth of your quilting evenly over the entire quilt as well as visually balanced.) Your quilt is done in a multitude of shades of blue, so having the dark blue thread on your light squares will not look out of place. To the contrary, it will most likely blend right in with the scheme of the quilt and not noticed as an individual component of the quilt. This is just my opinion. It is your quilt top so you do it the way you think will look best. Quilting is to hold the 3 layers together. As long as this is accomplished, all the rest is based on your own preferences.

    Congrats on finishing the top!

  19. #44
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    Yeah, I was thinking about only ommiting the very light blocks. So...every other square in each row will be stitched. If I did my measuring right the stitching should create a "grid" of 5.25" squares. Depending on how things go (good or bad) I might do the light colored sqaures, too.

    Oy. I had to go buy a different fabric for the back of the quilt because the other stuff got all...can't think of a single word to describe it...without swearing, anyways. After I took it out of the wash there were holes and runs and loose threads and...ugh, it wasn't pretty. Wasn't too happy about spending more money on fabric, but they marked it wrong (to my advantage) so I saved $2. Yay!

  20. #45
    Super Member vicki reno's Avatar
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    If you are machine quilting, then it will be jsut as easy to do diagonal lines all across the quilt in bothe directions. I use masking tape to mark stitching lines instead of a pencil. Just take care not to let your stitches drift onto the tape, makes it harder to get off afterwards. Going diagonal through all the blocks won't be as much trouble as stopping and startin to only do certain ones, if you are machine quilting, that is. Low loft batting should work just fine , that way you can still move under it instead of being weighted down with a thicker batting. Good Luck!

  21. #46
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    Yes, I am machine quilting it. I can't sew an even hand stitch to begin with. And holy buckets...hand sewing through denim would wear my fingers to the bone.

    But if I'm doing every other square...I shouldn't have to stop... :? :?: Maybe it'd be better if I showed you what I had in mind.



  22. #47
    Super Member vicki reno's Avatar
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    Okay, I can picture that. That would look really good! Now that i see what you had in mind, it all makes sense! GReat job on getting the top done!

  23. #48
    Super Member ceannastahr's Avatar
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    I think that would be perfect not only easy strigt lines but it will also give you a diamon pattern when done

  24. #49

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    f v g this is great. the diamond pattern and all

  25. #50
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    Plus, I don't have to sew quite as much. :D

    Now all I need to do is sandwich everything together (was going to do that yesterday, but got caught up with something else...). I'm going to get some of that basting spray tomorrow because it'll probably take me too long to hand baste the quilt and then do the quilting and the binding.

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