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Thread: Struggling

  1. #1
    Senior Member cminor's Avatar
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    Struggling

    I am making a quilt for a friend that she is giving to her niece for her wedding. This is the first "requested" quilt I am making. She picked the colors and the pattern but was willing to go with my suggestions. I was cautious to not lead her in a direction she didn't want to go. However this friend has a very different style than I do.

    That being said - the quilt I am working on is ....ok. But not something I am excited about. This really keeps me from being excited to work on it. I am sure it will look good and I will be proud once it is done - I just really don't have the umph I wish I had.

    Any suggestions on how to pull through? Other than not making "requested" quilts

  2. #2
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    1. Be proud that your friend values your craft and asked for you to make a quilt for a special occasion.
    2. Keep reminding yourself that this is not a quilt you will keep. Therefore, it doesn't matter if YOU like it or not. It matters that your friend (and her niece) like it.
    3. Find something about it that you appreciate. (Color, pattern, your perfect 1/4" seam, the seams pressed correctly.....)
    4. Set yourself mini-goals and work at one goal at a time. That way you don't think of "HAVING to finish a quilt" but finishing step X. It will be done before you know it.
    Hope that helps. Yes, I have worked on quilts I don't like, so I had to suspend my emotions. I was always surprised by the end of the project how much I had grown to like it.

  3. #3
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    Having completed a quilt this summer for someone else, using colors that were not my palette, I'd agree with setting mini goals. I broke my pattern up into small, doable sections, and set time goals for each so I'd complete it in time. I also took pictures of my workmanship. Heck yeah my corners met up correctly!

  4. #4
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    ​Do it in stages with little rewards for yourself in between the stages.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Pagzz's Avatar
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    when working on non complex sections listen to books on tape. that makes the time go fast for me

  6. #6
    Senior Member Terri D.'s Avatar
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    Let a kitchen timer be your best friend. You can endure almost anything in small doses.

  7. #7
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    Just consider it a new venture like a road you've not gone down. Maybe add a little bit of you into it. Just a little. Are you good at camo or where's waldo? Just try to enjoy the ride. You don't have to go down the road again when you get to your destination.

  8. #8
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    Hire someone else to make the top. I've done that when I had obligated myself to making a quilt and I just couldn't go through with it. Just my little secret and no one cared anyway as the quilt was a gift to someone I didn't know. The label read given to ____ from_________. No pattern or maker info.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
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    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Onetomatoplant's Avatar
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    Make it fun for yourself by laughing at the differences between you and your friend. My good friend and I are polar opposites when it comes to our tastes in most things, and often when one tells the other about something she did or liked, the other will respond with a head shake and a "I don't know why we're friends." We enjoy the differences. (Ok, sometimes we enjoy making fun of them!). At her request, I made her some mug rugs for her birthday. I hate pink. But it was so much fun choosing pink fabric to use in the mug rugs because I knew it would surprise her and make her laugh that I had to work with it.

    Reading this, it sounds like we're really dysfunctional and maybe shouldn't be friends, but I love her with all my heart. Even if she likes pink.
    I love the smell of Best Press in the morning!

  10. #10
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    Just dig in and get it done. Try to stop telling yourself how uninspired you are. Put on some music you love or a favorite old movie and just go to work. It will be done before you know it. Unfortunately, if you are going to make 'requested' quilts you are occasionally going to be making quilts that do not inspire you.

  11. #11
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    Set aside an amount of time every day to work on it; for instance, a half hour, 45 minutes. When that time is up, stop and go on to something else. Do this every day, and it helps a lot getting through quilts you don't really like or anything else for that matter.

  12. #12
    Member BCaplette's Avatar
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    I just finished 2quilts for brothers that were black, gray and a bit of red. Even though I like these colors, I found it almost depressing to sew these together.I would work on 3 blocks then skip a day and work on 3 more. On the off days I would work on a small project that I had started that I was using bright, happy colors. It helped even my mood out. :-D lol

  13. #13
    Senior Member qwkslver's Avatar
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    Making something you really don't like is just a chore. Just grin and bear it. I just finished one, so glad it is done but proud I got through it. You are a good person for doing that.

  14. #14
    Super Member Cybrarian's Avatar
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    My also help to focus on the new couple who will be receiving your gift quilt. Focusing on your workmanship so your friend wil be excited and proud to give it and the bride and groom to receive it may be the perspective to help motivate you to complete it-along with what ever time limit/small goal system works for you!
    “Come to me all you who are weary and I will give you rest”~Jesus

  15. #15
    shy
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    I have made many requested quilts from family.Right now I am doing another tee shirt quilt. Which I totally hate making.
    Many have been colors I dislike.I drag my feet starting them every time..But once I start.Which I make myself do..I know I have to finish..I think about the person not the quilt..some of the quilts have turn out great..not my taste or style..but doesn't have to be to be nice..just finish a wedding quilt ..the colors were deep purple and turquoise..far out of my color range..but when done was beautiful..the groom comment was to the bride..I don't even like our colors..but this is beautiful..the comment was relayed back to me..had another ..not my colors..that ended up in all the wedding pictures..they like it so well..so my advise is think of your friend..fun times with her..do a few hours here and there..until u see it start to grow into a quilt..u may be surprised at what happens..if u keep negative feelings..u will end up fighting the quilt ..all the time u work on it..

  16. #16
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    The hardest part for me when I work with colors I dont't like is to make the right choice. For exemple, when layering my blocks to find the correct placement, nothing seems right! Last time, I took some pictures of several possibilities at different stage and sent it to the recipient, asking her what she prefered. Her enthousiasm helped me to keep motivation.

  17. #17
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    I guess great minds think alike. I was going to suggest three things:

    1) set a timer for 30 minutes to work on it
    2) think about your friend and what you value about her and how happy and honored she will feel that you did this for her loved one. Try to forget the colorway. It's "immaterial" --pun intended-- to your friendship.
    3) reward yourself when the timer goes off with something

  18. #18
    Super Member roserips's Avatar
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    Madquilter that is some really great advice for cminor as well as any of us working on those sorts of projects for others and a great way to reach out side of your self to grow your own creativity.

  19. #19
    Member QuiltNGanny's Avatar
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    Did you perhaps jump to the conclusion that it was the colors and it really is something missing in the quilt design? Does it need some contrast or a pattern change or is it really the colors? Try some options and see what pops for you. When I don't like a color it is way too easy for me to say its the color and not look at all the other design possibilities.

  20. #20
    Super Member wildyard's Avatar
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    I have to agree with laughing at the differences and making it fun doing something outside your comfort zone. This is what I did in a similar situation in making a comfort quilt for a friends niece. Let me tell you, I had more compliments on that quilt (that I didn't like even finished, lol) than almost any other of my quilts. Just goes to show, there's someone out there for every style and color combination!!
    Linda Wedge White

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  21. #21
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    Am I an odd one out, altho I haven't made a lot of quilts I love all colours, I do have my fav colours lilac and purple the best, then reds and blues. I also have not made a quilt for a person I don't know or on commission, so I cannot comment on that.

  22. #22
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    Think about the person you're making it for, rather than thinking about the quilt directly.

    I'm doing that now...I have 2 quilts I'm trying desperately to finish for Christmas, and neither one is my style AT ALL. But as I'm working on them, whenever I start to feel sick and tired of looking at all this foo-foo fabric, I just turn my mind to thinking about how much I love the people I'm making them for, and how the quilt will be loved and appreciated by them. That turns me around and makes me dig back into the work happily.

  23. #23
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    Sew the quilt because you like to sew. Sew it for the process of sewing, the joy of sewing. I make a lot of quilts for homeless families and often of whatever fabric I have on hand, some donated. Generally, I am not crazy about the colors but someone always likes them. I watch tv or listen to music or lectures or books on tape and just lose myself in the enjoyable process. It's much easier to give a quilt away when it is not your favorite colors.
    Last edited by cricket_iscute; 12-23-2014 at 12:13 PM.

  24. #24
    Super Member tlpa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadQuilter View Post
    1. Be proud that your friend values your craft and asked for you to make a quilt for a special occasion.
    2. Keep reminding yourself that this is not a quilt you will keep. Therefore, it doesn't matter if YOU like it or not. It matters that your friend (and her niece) like it.
    3. Find something about it that you appreciate. (Color, pattern, your perfect 1/4" seam, the seams pressed correctly.....)
    4. Set yourself mini-goals and work at one goal at a time. That way you don't think of "HAVING to finish a quilt" but finishing step X. It will be done before you know it.
    Hope that helps. Yes, I have worked on quilts I don't like, so I had to suspend my emotions. I was always surprised by the end of the project how much I had grown to like it.
    These are great suggestions, thanks!

  25. #25
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    When working on something I don't like, the reward of being done with it is the impetus that keeps me going (and hurrying!) I work faster so I can get done and rid of it sooner.
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