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Thread: T-Shirt Quilts

  1. #1
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    T-Shirt Quilts

    My granddaughter wants to make a T-Shirt quilt and I'm looking for some good directions, as I have never made one before. I need some help picking out a good quilting book for this. My granddaughter is 15 and has made a couple patchwork quilts and has done very well with them. Thank you for any advice.

  2. #2
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    actually you do not need to buy a book just search online and you will find alot of instructions on doing them.

  3. #3
    Super Member maryb119's Avatar
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    Cut the tee shirts extra big first. I cut mine at the shoulders and then the side seams. Then securely fuse interfacting on the back. I prefer a lightweight pelon. You can use a fusible tricot knit interfacing if you want to. The tee shirt knit runs up and down. Place the tricot knit crosswise so the block doesn't stretch. Then and only then, cut the blocks the size you want them to be. Now they are ready to sew. You can put them together with a sashing or just sew them together. You can really use your imagination. You can also add patches like scouting patches or school patches. I sew on lots of things as long as they are washable. I prefer to machine quilt a tee shirt quilt. The fabric is too stretchy for hand quilting.

  4. #4
    Junior Member Narda H.'s Avatar
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    I found the best book ever! T-Shirt Quilts Made Easy by Martha Deleonardis. This has about everything and it will inspire you to do something different if you want to. The only thing I discovered was she recommended Pellon 911FF and I found a even lighter weight fusible at my fav quilt shop. It cost a bit more but was very light and soft. You really don't need much to stabilize the fabric. Click on my name and you can see my posts to see the t-shirt quilt I made for a client.
    Have discovered paper piecing!
    OH YEAH

  5. #5
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Take a look at the Too Cool T-Shirt Quilts site ... to me, it's the way to go when making a T-Shirt Quilt.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  6. #6
    Senior Member PABerard's Avatar
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    I have made 3 quilts using their book also. I found them to be very straight forward. I bought their templates too, although a bit costly, but I couldn't make them myself. http://www.toocooltshirtquilts.com/
    Have fun!
    ~ Pat

  7. #7
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    www.crookednickel.com has the fusible gridded fabric to use 10" squares to make t-shirt quilts. They have a video on their website demo-ing their method.

  8. #8
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    I bought the templates and the book from Too Cool Tshirt quilts.I have made several T-shirt quilts using this method. However, the templates are pricey if you are only doing 1 quilt. I do NOT use interfacing on the back of the shirts. I quilt them on my home sewing machine.

  9. #9
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lakekids View Post
    I bought the templates and the book from Too Cool Tshirt quilts.I have made several T-shirt quilts using this method. However, the templates are pricey if you are only doing 1 quilt. I do NOT use interfacing on the back of the shirts. I quilt them on my home sewing machine.
    While you and PABerard have purchased the templates ... they are not mandatory.

    In my quilting rulers, I have the 4-1/2", 12-1/2", 16-1/2" and 20-1/2" square rulers.
    A 9-1/2" and just have to remember to cut at 8-1/2".

    No I don't have the rectangles ... and so, just work with what I have and cut accordingly.

    If doing a lot of quilts, I would have the missing sizes cut in plexi by our local glass shop.
    MInimal cost, compared to if I ordered them.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  10. #10
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maryb119 View Post
    Cut the tee shirts extra big first. I cut mine at the shoulders and then the side seams. Then securely fuse interfacting on the back. I prefer a lightweight pelon. You can use a fusible tricot knit interfacing if you want to. The tee shirt knit runs up and down. Place the tricot knit crosswise so the block doesn't stretch. Then and only then, cut the blocks the size you want them to be. Now they are ready to sew. You can put them together with a sashing or just sew them together. You can really use your imagination. You can also add patches like scouting patches or school patches. I sew on lots of things as long as they are washable. I prefer to machine quilt a tee shirt quilt. The fabric is too stretchy for hand quilting.
    This is really all the info you need. Just remember the T-shirt fabric will make a heavier quilt. I always used my 12.5 square. Don't try to make it too complicated with your first quilt. Good Luck !!
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

  11. #11
    Senior Member cindi's Avatar
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    If you're making all the blocks one square size, remember that the smallest the block can be must be the size of your biggest logo. So measure the length and width of all your logos. If the widest is 14" and the longest is 15", your block must be at least 15.5" square to allow for seam allowance. I make my own templates from heavyweight posterboard, and they can be used over and over again. I just cut the posterboard 2" bigger than the block size, cut the correct block size out of the center of it, and use a pencil to draw the block. Then I use my ruler & rotary cutter to cut the shirt. Clear as mud? I've got one of these for about every size you can think of. Good luck!

  12. #12
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    I used Eleanor Burns' T-Shirt Quilt pattern for my grandson's baseball quilt. I am one who likes a written pattern and her instructions are very good, of course. She includes drawings and yardage for different sizes. Also used some of her suggestions for how to use the buttons, neck line of jerseys. She has layouts for using different sizes of t-shirts and small logos. It is not an expensive pattern, maybe $8 or so. I was very nervous about starting to cut up my grandson's baseball t-shirts and jerseys! Was very pleased with it.

  13. #13
    Senior Member SusanSusan33's Avatar
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    One of the QB members has the BEST tutorial ever. Go to www.seamstobeyouandme.com. It is sooo thorough!

  14. #14
    Super Member Normabeth's Avatar
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    Missouri Star Quilt Company and a free tutorial on making T-Shirt quilts, it's actually done by one of Jenny's daughers,
    when I made my first t-shirt quilt, I found this very helpful.
    Be kinder than is necessary because everyone you meet is
    fighting some kind of battle

  15. #15
    Senior Member Stitch124's Avatar
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    I am working on a t-shirt quilt now and not using a pattern. Many of the ideas above are really good advice. I will tell you what I've learned to do and not to do.

    To do: Decide what size you want to make and what size your machine will accommodate when it comes to quilting. I told my friend to provide 20 t-shirts. I ended up with a 25 - 12.5" squares. Some were squares made up by putting four logos from the front of four shirts together into a 12.5" square. I also made a 2.5" sashing and 2.5" border. This quilt is now almost the size of a king size quilt! Consider making a smaller quilt...say 10 - 15 t-shirts.

    To Do: Use the correct stabilizer. I actually purchased stabilizer that was too stiff and used it for about 1/2 of the squares. The other half of the squares I used a lighter weight stabilizer. Now the quilt is stiiffer in some areas and just right in others, making it hard to quilt.

    To Do: Use low loft batting - T-shirt quilts are heavy to begin with...Low loft will make it easier to work with in your machine.

    To Do: I am seriously considering tying this quilt rather than quilting it, since it is so big and I am working on a manual Singer 301A. I don't want to mess up the backing and batting and make it pucker because I can't keep my quilt laying flat in my small machine when quilting it. LA is not an option because the lady who wants it doesn't want to pay that much for it.

    Just my 2 cents worth.

  16. #16
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    I've only made one tee shirt quilt and I am thrilled with it. I did not use a pattern or book, just some advice from friends and on line. Fusible tricot interfacing worked well for me. Follow good advice of Maryb in this thread. A few of the shirts were old or thin, so the interfacing was important. Tee shirt quilts are a bit heavy, so I used a light bamboo-cotton batting and a cotton backing, no flannel. Have fun.

  17. #17
    Senior Member cindi's Avatar
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    I use Warm & Natural for my t-shirt quilts. Thin, but cozy. My Australia quilt does have a flannel back, and I must admit, I love it! I was pleasantly surprised that the quilt didn't end up heavy at all, and it's not too warm. It's June and I'm using it in the house right now as I write this. I think using the lightweight interfacing definitely helped in that respect.

  18. #18
    Super Member Zappycat's Avatar
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    I took a class at a local quilt shop. It seems like all the quilt shops always run this class... especially now at graduation time! BUT... as everyone else said, you don't need the class, its very easy. But if you do take the class I can almost guarantee that you will learn more from your classmates that you will from the teacher if you are not following rigid instructions. It was amazing to see everyone's ideas come to life. I made mine from my daughter's soccer jerseys from her entire soccer career along with a few high school and college tshirts. I did not use lattice or borders. I followed advice from feline fanatic here on the boards and made my borders from more t shirts. I am backing it with flannel because I want it to feel like a warm and cozy sweatshirt! It was such a fun project! (http://www.quiltingboard.com/picture...t-t221094.html)
    Last edited by Zappycat; 06-26-2013 at 06:32 AM.

  19. #19
    Super Member skaduzy's Avatar
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    What fusible did you use?

    Quote Originally Posted by Narda H. View Post
    I found the best book ever! T-Shirt Quilts Made Easy by Martha Deleonardis. This has about everything and it will inspire you to do something different if you want to. The only thing I discovered was she recommended Pellon 911FF and I found a even lighter weight fusible at my fav quilt shop. It cost a bit more but was very light and soft. You really don't need much to stabilize the fabric. Click on my name and you can see my posts to see the t-shirt quilt I made for a client.
    Sew many Quilts.......so little time!

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