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Thread: technical question about scalloped binding

  1. #1
    Senior Member alisonquilts's Avatar
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    technical question about scalloped binding

    I am going to sew binding onto a quilt with scalloped edges. I have prepared bias binding, and the scallops are the large, gentle scallops typical of mid century applique quilts. I will be machine stitching to the front, then hand finishing on the back.

    Are there any tricks you can share to make this go well? Do I just sew it on as I would binding on a straight-sided quilt? Extra pins?

    Alison

  2. #2
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
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    All the information you could ever want to know! Google's search:

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  3. #3
    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
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    The best advice I got when doing the same process is to not join the binding strips all at once. Join as you go. This way you can control where the seams land. I was afraid that I would have a seam end up in the valley creating bulk. Here is where I got my instructions. Lengthy but you can skip what you dont care about.
    http://lindafranz.com/section/scallops/38

  4. #4
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    If it's gentle curves, then the bias will deal with all your worries!

    I never pin anymore ... just use the hair clips. Just pin it as normal ... hard to know if it's more pins, as we don;t know how often you would pin it normally.

    Just watch as you go that it does not get overstretched or that it'll get gathered.

    You'll do just fine AlisonQ ... I know you will!
    And I'm anxiously waiting to see THE quilt!
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  5. #5
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    My advice - skip the binding and put on a facing instead.

  6. #6
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    When I've done scallops, I've found it to be helpful to clip the quilt at the bottom of the "v" between scallops, enabling you to sew the binding on more easily.
    psumom

  7. #7
    Senior Member alisonquilts's Avatar
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    Thanks all! I appreciate your suggestions and will ponder them...

    Although it is too late for the attach-strips-as-you-go approach, you have now given me the idea that I can change where seams land if it looks like they will become inconvenient - I am sure this wouldn't have occurred to me if you hadn't mentioned it! Such a creature of habit.

    QuiltE - which one is the quilt?!?

    Alison

  8. #8
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alisonquilts View Post
    ...........QuiltE - which one is the quilt?!?
    Alison
    THE would be THIS ... with the scallops!
    I'm guessing this is your Mom's embroidered blocks?
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  9. #9
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    When I have done a scalloped edge using bias , I very slightly stretch the bias as I am attaching the bias. It helps to get a smoother binding and it will "roll" to the back much smoother. Notice I said "slightly". Make a practice scallop to test out your method. Make sure it has two scallops so you get feel for the inside turn .. the trickest part.

  10. #10
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    The only advice is to go slow and use bias binding since curves are involved.
    Judy

  11. #11
    Super Member Sneed's Avatar
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    I agree that the Linda Franz website is an awfully good place for instruction. I think the best advice I found was to pull the bias binding fairly tight as you do the inner points. Her instructions worked really well for me...especially stopping to eat a little chocolate as you go.

  12. #12
    Super Member mike'sgirl's Avatar
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    I have never done scallops, on the list! But I am thinking that it might work well to use some Elmer's to glue it down first. I do this for my borders and my bindings.

  13. #13
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by romanojg View Post
    The only advice is to go slow and use bias binding since curves are involved.
    I agree with Judy. Slow as you go. I use the hair clips too but you want that perfect tuck so use a pin there. Good Luck !!
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