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Thread: Thanks to the old fashioned Rippers!

  1. #1

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    Uh, there's a new notice at the top... Good thing I want to talk about quilting! :D

    Now I'd like to thank all of you ladies. Everytime there was a need to cut a large amount of fabric, there were all of you traditionalists. I said iron it and stack it gently and cut through many layers and once... But no each time you were all there "it's okay to rip it" "If you're worried check it on a test piece." "Don't worry it will rip just fine." Each time I listened, but with the cost of fabric, I always shied away...

    Then came my bolt. The bolt of natural muslin I bought a while back. Yep. I needed some and I didn't want to get down on the floor and get the mat out. So I took that puppy and RIPPPPED it. Can I just say wow? More even and straight than I could have cut it, barely a wiggle and certainly less than 1/8"! Just a little snip and RIP! I did find that I needed to be careful when I was ready to rip the other grain and even though I cut it in the right direction to only "rip" a little to be sure the tear was going the right direction.

    So I thank you. My fabric thanks you, my mat and cutter thank you. There is a time and a place for everything and your gentle patience with the old ways have served me well, and I'm certain will continue to do so as I work through this bolt. Have a cocktail you've earned it, always being there, never swaying from the old ways. Amen to you!

  2. #2
    reneebobby's Avatar
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    HUmmmmm I'll have to try this. It's so hard to cut off a yard when you have 3 or 4 yards.

  3. #3
    Super Member beachlady's Avatar
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    I am still afraid!!

  4. #4

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    Next time I do it, I'll try and take photos to show it's no big deal. :D

  5. #5
    Power Poster sandpat's Avatar
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    Cluck..cluck..cluck...I'm still WAY to chicken to do it...I'm afraid of stretching the fabric. That stuff is WAY expensive.

  6. #6
    Senior Member humbird's Avatar
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    Told ya!!! :D

  7. #7
    all4quilt's Avatar
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    My mother was a "RIPPER". I have never been afraid! Loved your post, Elizabeth!

    Susan

  8. #8
    Senior Member crashnquilt's Avatar
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    If you are ripping the fabric on the length of grain (straight of grain) yes you will get a good straight piece. This is a very good way to get your fabric straight. But if you rip on the cross grain, do not be surprised if your rip is not even all the way across. The cross grain can become quite distorted from being on the bolt and being folded for long periods of time.

    Just wanted to let you know.

  9. #9
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
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    ElizABETH,

    I have been to several quilt shops that rip their fabrics. Quilt shop quality fabric rips well. I know the stuff in my stash from Walmart or Joanns doesn't perform as well. The comment about the crossgrain is true. One of the first things I was told in Junior High Home Economics 40 years ago, was that the fabric is often rolled on the bolts under pressure and possibly even damp. It is often distored in that direction. They also told us not to purchase fabric that was printed off grain. Those of you who have come to quilting without first garmet sewing need to take grain into account. Sewing patterns are marked for grain for a very good reason. The same principles that make a garmet hang properly apply to quilting. Those of you who have had a quilt end up having ruffled borders learned the hard way.

  10. #10
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    See - I think that is an excellent reason to rip across the grain. I do not want to put warped fabric into my quilt! Fabrics may look okay on the bolt and then turn out to be "warped". Ripping it will reveal any problems. Prewashing will help to straighten things, and you can even try stretching and blocking if the fabric is worth the effort, but it's good to know if you have bad fabric.

    It's not just Walmart. I purchased a couple yards of Red Rooster fabric from the quilt shop recently - a large scale plaid - and it was printed TERRIBLY off grain. It looked fine on the bolt. I ended up cutting it along the print (off grain) and using it to line a crafty project, but I am glad I ripped it and didn't end up using it in a quilt.

  11. #11
    Super Member vicki reno's Avatar
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    I rip b/c I cannot cut straight strips to save my soul. I do try to use the good stuff for that, mainly for sashing and borders. But to me, its the only way to go! :-)

  12. #12
    Super Member Moonpi's Avatar
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    And you have to admit, there is something about the sound that is empowering. Try to time it when someone is bending over and you will see how quickly they check themselves

  13. #13

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    LOL Moonpi! :lol:

  14. #14
    jem
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    Junior Member jem's Avatar
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    Ripping is o k with me if I am not concerned about how it comes out. But, with good fabric and wanting a good looking quilt I depend on my mat, ruler, and rotary cutter. It may take a little longer but for me it is worth it.
    Elaine
    aka
    Jem

  15. #15

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    hu, I guess I find that surprising. You can't tell one bit of difference between the fabric I ripped and the fabric I rotary cut, and certainly not once it was all quilted up.

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