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Thread: Are there any binding tricks.....

  1. #1
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    Are there any binding tricks.....

    Are there any tricks to getting the sewing line straight on the back of the quilt when machine sewing binding on? Just practice? I use the flange method sometimes and I feel like that is better. Not that big of a deal, but I must admit I have a hard time seeing a crooked sewing line like I was sipping my wine as I was putting my binding on.

  2. #2
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    I have been quilting for years and the wandering sewing line for machine bindings really bug me for the reason you stated. If I am doing a machine binding, I am only happy with the flange method. If you match the thread colour to the backing, it is almost invisible.

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    I've given up on getting a straight line on the back when machine binding. The solution for me is to use a serpentine stitch. I sew fairly close to the binding seam on the front so that the stitching for the seam is not visible under the binding on the back.

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    It’s not a crooked sewing line - it’s a design feature! (Or so I tell myself).

  5. #5
    DJ
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    I hand sew my bindings, but if I wanted to machine stitch it, I would try a decorative stitch, probably serpentine.

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    I have a friend who sews all her bindings on by machine. She actually glues them down evenly on the back. Then goes very slow on the front. If there's a flange at least it's consistent.

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    well i fold my binding over to the back and pin it with a straight pin through the front, putting pin long ways along the binding. check with fingers or looking and pin, pin, pin. then sew removing the pins as i go. that helps a great deal and don't miss any spots.
    a
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    The fat quarter shop has several videos on all subjects, including binding, that are really helpful. I'm a little hesitant to give specific advice since my binding is, shall we say, less that perfect. I've been told to be sure it's cut square to begin with and to pull the binding evenly, not tighter in some spots. Someone also mentioned to try folding the quilt in half and seeing if the corners and sides matched up.

  9. #9
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    Here's the link for machine binding:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VgaXP6kd8bc
    I think the trick is in how you trim the edges after quilting.
    They also have one for hand binding.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6k63ZGAS2Xo
    Hope this helps!!
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 11-08-2019 at 04:01 AM. Reason: make links active

  10. #10
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Claire123 View Post
    Here's the link for machine binding:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VgaXP6kd8bc
    I think the trick is in how you trim the edges after quilting.
    They also have one for hand binding.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6k63ZGAS2Xo
    Hope this helps!!
    thanks for sharing
    Nancy in western NY
    before you speak T.H.I.N.K.
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    Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we are here we might as well dance.

  11. #11
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    The easiest and fastest way I've found to sew binding is the Martelli Binding System. (not affiliated) There is a learning curve, but once the system is mastered, it's heaven!

  12. #12
    Senior Member Fizzle's Avatar
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    Have the Martelli binder. Have not tried it. Better get it out and start watching videos!

    came with my table and i have never seen it in action...

  13. #13
    Super Member juliasb's Avatar
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    I have yet to find a trick that works every time. For quilts that go for gifts I will always do the bindings by hand.

  14. #14
    Senior Member leighway's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by institches33 View Post
    The easiest and fastest way I've found to sew binding is the Martelli Binding System. (not affiliated) There is a learning curve, but once the system is mastered, it's heaven!
    This was all I needed to see to give me a quick kick in the keister! I've had that thing in my sewing closet for a couple of years now and I guess it's time to take it out and master it!! That wandering line on the back is why I hand stitch my bindings but with all I have in my 'to-do' pile and watching my years grow shorter, I guess it's time. Thanks!
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 11-09-2019 at 09:23 AM. Reason: fix quote

  15. #15
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    Thanks everybody for the replies. To you dear ladies that own the Martelli binding system, let us know how it goes. I also think nativetexan's method is an option, but I would not be fast with all that pinning either. For now I will probably continue to hand sew because the way my brain is wired that line should be straight. Lol.

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    Quote Originally Posted by leighway View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by institches33 View Post
    The easiest and fastest way I've found to sew binding is the Martelli Binding System. (not affiliated) There is a learning curve, but once the system is mastered, it's heaven!
    This was all I needed to see to give me a quick kick in the keister! I've had that thing in my sewing closet for a couple of years now and I guess it's time to take it out and master it!! That wandering line on the back is why I hand stitch my bindings but with all I have in my 'to-do' pile and watching my years grow shorter, I guess it's time. Thanks!
    I just watched the quick video on this. Wow, it is really is very precise. one more tool and probably pretty expensive as all of the Martelli tools are. Hmmmm Something to think about.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 11-09-2019 at 09:25 AM. Reason: shouting/all caps

  17. #17
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    Martelli used to have 50% off of everything as a black friday sale. Not sure this still happens, but I may check it out.

  18. #18
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    the easiest way to avoid this is to use a decorative stitch. My favorite is one that is a bit wavy and has a tiny leaf. It will catch everything and if done with a variegated thread, it can add a nice touch. I often find myself sewing very late at night and the old eyes don't want to work that well that late! If the top screams for a straight stitch, just go very slowly and keep looking at your stitch line underneath so that you are sewing either directly on top of it or a thread or two next to that line. You could take the time and pin it like crazy, but I do not have the patience for that (the same reason I do not hand sew the binding!). I am in awe of all the folks who do hand sew it and if entering it in a show, I know I will have to - but for now.......

  19. #19
    Super Member Jeanette Frantz's Avatar
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    I cannot say that I'm really "good" at binding quilts, but I use Jenny Doan's (Missouri Star Quilt) method and I've found it to work very well. One thing I do differently is that I cut my binding lengthwise of the grain. Unless I'm doing rounded corners, I don't use bias as a matter of course. But, I have used bias and have no problems with that either. Using Jenny Doan's method, I've found I can attain very good corners. I hand-hem all my bindings. I don't make a great many quilts, but I put a little of myself in every one of them.

  20. #20
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    This is the number 10 foot on my Bernina, but most machine manufacturers have an equivalent to the edge foot.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 11-10-2019 at 05:21 AM. Reason: shouting/all caps
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