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Thread: Too hot for infant?

  1. #1
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    I am almost finished with the top of the rag baby quilt BUT concerned about using filling that might be too hot for infant. Top is flannel and have read where using too much flannel fabric in quilt makes them very warm. Since this is a newborn I don't want him sweating or too warm. What do think? Quilt batting?Warm n Natural? The backing will be cotton nursery print fabric. I know, I know....but it is my first one....and need to use up my stash...

  2. #2
    Super Member maryb119's Avatar
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    I like warm and natural with flannel. Its soft and cozy to snuggle under and the cotton "breathes" with your skin.

  3. #3

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    I was just given a 3 layer flannel rag quilt for my newborn and she doesn't seem to get too hot. You should be okay just using the flannel.

  4. #4
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Rag quilts are dangerous for newborns and babies. I wouldn't give one as a gift and wouldn't use one for a baby, period.

  5. #5
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    I take into account where the baby is living. If in snow country, Warm n Natural wouldn't be too much. If in Southern California, I might use a thin flannel.

  6. #6
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    a rag quilt can be used on the floor with baby on it to play. so don't fret over warmth. it will be used, even if not in the crib. and a rag quilt can be turned over and the "safer" side used.

  7. #7
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    I think you should keep a quilt for a baby as thin as possible.

  8. #8
    Super Member Qbee's Avatar
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    Realistically, they can't "cover them up" with any kind of blanket while they are a newborn so it will most likely be used for the little one to either lay on or covering up in car seat, etc. until they are older.

  9. #9
    Super Member SherriB's Avatar
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    As I was learning to quilt, I made several rag quilt for my grandbabies. I started out with low-loft poly but later went to just 3 layers of flannel. After a few washing, the seams had pretty much "ragged" together and rarely did I see a string from them. I didn't know about the potential hazzard it could pose either.

    I think you just need to be very diligent with anything around babies. DD mainly used the blankets to cover Lexi and Gabe when they went outside or let them lay on the floor. Most often they were covered up in the house with receiving blankets.

  10. #10
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    raggy flannel quilts are usually not recommended for infants (children under 3) they can get the frayed edges onto their mouths and choke

  11. #11
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    what is your source of information for the "danger"? I've made/used both tied and rag quilts for nearly 30 years. noone ever mentioned this as being a problem for them with their babies.

  12. #12
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bakermom
    what is your source of information for the "danger"? I've made/used both tied and rag quilts for nearly 30 years. noone ever mentioned this as being a problem for them with their babies.

    Common sense is my source.

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    As a mom, I am well aware of the danger of SIDS and leaving an infant unattended with a blanket of any sort. However, my common sense, such as it is, tells me that if a well washed rag quilt (the long threads removed in the wash) were too dangerous for a supervised infant, many of the books and toys that are intentionally made with varying materials such as ribbons to stimulate a baby would also be too dangerous. I just don't buy it. Just supervise your kids.


    Quote Originally Posted by Candace
    Quote Originally Posted by bakermom
    what is your source of information for the "danger"? I've made/used both tied and rag quilts for nearly 30 years. noone ever mentioned this as being a problem for them with their babies.

    Common sense is my source.

  14. #14
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    I would say any strings coming off the fringed fabrics would be very short and not really a choking hazard, and after a few washings there wouldn't be any left to fall off. Not sure I would put one on a tiny infant, but after a few months I cannot see any danger. As above, a lot of toys given are much more dangerous with glued on embellishments, painted on faces, ribbons, bows, fringes, etc.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mattee
    As a mom, I am well aware of the danger of SIDS and leaving an infant unattended with a blanket of any sort. However, my common sense, such as it is, tells me that if a well washed rag quilt (the long threads removed in the wash) were too dangerous for a supervised infant, many of the books and toys that are intentionally made with varying materials such as ribbons to stimulate a baby would also be too dangerous. I just don't buy it. Just supervise your kids.


    Quote Originally Posted by Candace
    Quote Originally Posted by bakermom
    what is your source of information for the "danger"? I've made/used both tied and rag quilts for nearly 30 years. noone ever mentioned this as being a problem for them with their babies.

    Common sense is my source.
    I was thinking the same thing. Last I heard, regulations state that any strings or ribbons must be 6" or shorter so as to lessen the strangulation risk (this was while studying in college so in the last 5 years things might have changed - they seem to change their minds every few months anyway!). If lint or fuzz is the concern, I would think dolls with yarn hair would be bad, too. Once it is properly washed and dried a few times any lint "danger" (if there is one) is pretty much gone. I would think a rag quilt would be a good texture for babies. There is a whole company marketing tag items that haven't posed any obvious risks yet or I am sure they would have been pulled of the market by now. There are going to be freak accidents, but you can't really raise a child in a plastic bubble?

    As for the original question, I have never made a rag quilt before, but 3 layers of flannel should be fine. I used one that was 2 layers during the spring and summer or to nurse b/c it seemed too light weight for much warmth. I would use it with my baby, especially in the car or on the floor. When they were itty bitty, baby blankets were perfect for tummy time and impromptu naps while away from home.

  16. #16
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    That is the point I wanted to make.
    Quote Originally Posted by moonangel12
    Quote Originally Posted by Mattee
    As a mom, I am well aware of the danger of SIDS and leaving an infant unattended with a blanket of any sort. However, my common sense, such as it is, tells me that if a well washed rag quilt (the long threads removed in the wash) were too dangerous for a supervised infant, many of the books and toys that are intentionally made with varying materials such as ribbons to stimulate a baby would also be too dangerous. I just don't buy it. Just supervise your kids.


    Quote Originally Posted by Candace
    Quote Originally Posted by bakermom
    what is your source of information for the "danger"? I've made/used both tied and rag quilts for nearly 30 years. noone ever mentioned this as being a problem for them with their babies.

    Common sense is my source.
    I was thinking the same thing. Last I heard, regulations state that any strings or ribbons must be 6" or shorter so as to lessen the strangulation risk (this was while studying in college so in the last 5 years things might have changed - they seem to change their minds every few months anyway!). If lint or fuzz is the concern, I would think dolls with yarn hair would be bad, too. Once it is properly washed and dried a few times any lint "danger" (if there is one) is pretty much gone. I would think a rag quilt would be a good texture for babies. There is a whole company marketing tag items that haven't posed any obvious risks yet or I am sure they would have been pulled of the market by now. There are going to be freak accidents, but you can't really raise a child in a plastic bubble?

    As for the original question, I have never made a rag quilt before, but 3 layers of flannel should be fine. I used one that was 2 layers during the spring and summer or to nurse b/c it seemed too light weight for much warmth. I would use it with my baby, especially in the car or on the floor. When they were itty bitty, baby blankets were perfect for tummy time and impromptu naps while away from home.

  17. #17
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Anyone who has experience making rag quilts knows sometimes a slight tug of the material will pull off pieces of fabric. Very easy to stick in the mouth and swallow. No I don't raise my children in bubbles, but I also don't want them dead. My great uncle died at 2 1/2 years old from a choking hazzard. So, I wouldn't intentionally put danger in my child's path, either.

    If you feel it's safe enough, that's your decision.

  18. #18
    Super Member Qbee's Avatar
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    Goodness....poor FMD36....all you wanted to know was how thick to make the filling!!

  19. #19
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    Not to cause a problem here but most of us who had children over 30 years ago mananged to raise them perfectly well. Our daughters are now beseiged with horrors and concerns we never thought about and frankly I think most of it is ridiculous. Makes for very nervous mothers. We all were given common sense so my opinion is to use your own. Every couple of years the medical profession changes everything anyway...so unless something is proven absolutely life threatening I would suggest using your common sense. Good grief we wrapped our babies up in flannel receiving blankets in bed oftentimes with a quilt or afgan on top for warmth. I don't understand how we did it and the mothers before us did it with no problems and now everyone has problems with it.

  20. #20
    Super Member quiltmaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fmd36
    I am almost finished with the top of the rag baby quilt BUT concerned about using filling that might be too hot for infant. Top is flannel and have read where using too much flannel fabric in quilt makes them very warm. Since this is a newborn I don't want him sweating or too warm. What do think? Quilt batting?Warm n Natural? The backing will be cotton nursery print fabric. I know, I know....but it is my first one....and need to use up my stash...
    I apologize for getting off your topic but allowed the other opinions to take over. My suggestion would be to use the flannel with your backing being a cotton print I think using a thin cotton batt would be just fine and not to warm. The mother would know if or when her child was too warm and could use something else she has if necessary.

  21. #21
    moonangel12's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltmaker
    Not to cause a problem here but most of us who had children over 30 years ago mananged to raise them perfectly well. Our daughters are now beseiged with horrors and concerns we never thought about and frankly I think most of it is ridiculous. Makes for very nervous mothers. We all were given common sense so my opinion is to use your own. Every couple of years the medical profession changes everything anyway...so unless something is proven absolutely life threatening I would suggest using your common sense. Good grief we wrapped our babies up in flannel receiving blankets in bed oftentimes with a quilt or afgan on top for warmth. I don't understand how we did it and the mothers before us did it with no problems and now everyone has problems with it.
    I'm with you on that one, and I'm only 26 ;-) I have a Bachelor's in Child Development and some of it was just frustrating. I know there are logical reasons for many of the new rules and regulations, but others are in place b/c one person had one incident - either purely accidental or based solely on the fact they they didn't have common sense. As sad as it is, we live in a sue happy world so everyone has to walk on eggshells. The poor babies at one of the day cares I worked at had to have the room at 68-72 degrees, and were not allowed blankets in their cribs (SIDS regulations). That's a chilly temp to nap at with no blanket, especially during the summer when their parents dressed them in onesies, tanks tops, shorts, etc.

    Sorry to totally hijack your thread :oops: I know this is SO not what you were anticipating asking such an innocent and simple question.

  22. #22
    Super Member noveltyjunkie's Avatar
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    Most people would not put a warm quilt over a baby, at least until it is old enough to work itself free if it gets covered in it. So, to answer your question, I would not put any batting in it at all.

    If someone gave me a rag quilt for a baby I would probably use it as a wall hanging.

  23. #23

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    Actually, that doesn't happen with any of the three that I've made after a good wash. Interesting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Candace
    Anyone who has experience making rag quilts knows sometimes a slight tug of the material will pull off pieces of fabric. Very easy to stick in the mouth and swallow. No I don't raise my children in bubbles, but I also don't want them dead. My great uncle died at 2 1/2 years old from a choking hazzard. So, I wouldn't intentionally put danger in my child's path, either.

    If you feel it's safe enough, that's your decision.

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