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Old 01-24-2007, 06:39 PM
  #11  
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I also make half-square triangles 1 inch larger and trim to size.

e.g. If I want 3" finished half-square triangles I cut a square of fabric 8" X 8" from two fabrics. On the lighter fabric I draw the diagonals from corner to corner and across midway on the sides. Sew 1/4" seam on both sides of the diagonals; cut on the diagonals and across. This gives you 8 slightly larger half-square triangle blocks. Trim each to 3 1/2" square.

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Old 01-25-2007, 09:26 AM
  #12  
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Judy, that sounds like the way to go. I know Eleanor Burns has several patterns where she starts with smaller fabric sizes like that (9 patch, for example). It makes it easier to keep wayward fabric under control and squaring it up is much simpler.
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Old 01-25-2007, 12:38 PM
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I sent a post on half square triangles. Did you receive it at your personal address? I thought I sent it to the forum.
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Old 01-26-2007, 01:19 AM
  #14  
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I've been watching this thread with great interest since - as I've already confessed - triangles and points are my biggest challenge.

I wonder ... might it not work better to draw the diagonal lines on the back of the "under-patch", then attach a slightly oversized square, and sew along the line on the back the same way you would if paper piecing? Seems to me it would be more likely the triange ends up in the right place and folds back to guarantee it could be trimmed to fit and line up properly.

Has anybody tried it that way? Does it work?
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Old 01-26-2007, 10:13 AM
  #15  
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Question!! When you sew a larger triangle in, and cut it down to size, how do you make sure your block comes out the right size? I seem to let the pieces spread a little, or get a little longer or shorter anyway, and the only way I know I am way far off is if a triangle does not fit in the way it is supposed to. How do you maintain the right scale? :?:
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Old 01-26-2007, 10:59 AM
  #16  
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I have a square ruller with the diagonal marked. I line the diagonal up with the hypotenuse of the triangle and cut top and right side. I turn the triangle around and line the edges up with the measurements and cut the remaining top and right side.

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Old 01-26-2007, 01:31 PM
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HALF SQUARE TRIANGLES....
this is an easier way. I am searching for a pattern on line that will give you the instructions. Writing it out is complicated. I will try.

AS an example....Eleanor Burns (in some of books) has suggested this:

Cut 2 squares 3 1/2" (best cut from 2 strips laid face to face and cut 3 1/2" wide.)

Using a pen and ruler, MARK lines which will be used as cutting lines. MARK this way. draw a + that will divide the block into 4 smaller squares.

Draw lines from the top of the + to the side, to the bottom and up to the top again. Be certain to measure the exact center of the top, bottom and sides for accuracy. This is NOT an X. You will have a square set on point, within the block. This will create a triangle in each of the squares you have marked earlier.

Sew 1/4" on either side of these last lines. Check so you can see that you are sewing a diagonal seam through each of the squares of that 4 (square) block. SEW ON BOTH SIDES OF THE DRAWN LINES. That will be 8 short seams.

NOW. get your rotary cutter and cut on the lines DRAWN WITH THE PEN. You should have 8 pieces when cut. Each one will be pressed E Burns always squared her blocks. Results: 8 triangle blocks that are 2 colors.

I like to make one light and one dark. You can use any combination you choose.

For a Pinwheel quilt I make these blocks starting with an 8" square.

Make one sample block and I think you will get the hang of it and be able to figure out your pattern and incorporate this idea.

I am sorry I could not find an example on line. If and when I do I will be sure to send it. I hope this helps. Please contact me for more help. I have made 3 of these quilts.

Will you share what pattern you are using? June







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Old 01-26-2007, 05:00 PM
  #18  
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I FOUND IT....EXACTLY WHAT I WAS TRYING TO DESCRIBE !!!

http://www.equilters.com/library/blocks/broken_dishes-hstB.html

I hope this is helpful to those who have never done this type block. I find them easy and fun to do.

I have made these in different sizes. They can either be put together matched or mismatched. Last year Fons and Porter magazine had this pattern made up called "Summer Dreams." It was then I knew I wanted to do this pattern in several sizes.

Make some samples and have a good time doing it. Easy.

June
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Old 01-29-2007, 08:37 PM
  #19  
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OMG So much to learn. Thanks so much for all your tips! I have learned so much from this website. I greatly appreciate everyones comments, I take them to heart and fingers! I think I have that OCD that was mentioned. I think it all has to be perfect or it isn't right. Thanks for reminding me that it is ok to mess up and still it will be a nice quilt. :lol:
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Old 01-30-2007, 02:23 AM
  #20  
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Use fairly thick cardboard (at least 1/8-inch thick)
Cut a square to the finished size you want
Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner of the cardboard square
Glue sandpaper, fabric, or anything else, to the bottom of the cardboard square so it won't slip
Lay the cardboard square, lined side up, on top of your oversized patch. Line up the diagonal line on the cardboard with the diagonal line in your patch
Cut the patch to size.

I supposed you could do the same thing with something clear, like template plastic. You'd have to glue dots of something to the underside so you could see through to your patch. Just make sure whatever you use is thick enough that you can't easily cut through it by accident.

They make square rulers with grids and lines that'll work, but I'm a bit clumsy and heavy-handed with the rotary cutter. It slips out of place and I'm right back where I started ... every square a different size and out of whack. :cry:
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