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Thread: Twin Needle

  1. #26

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    twin needles are normaly used in heirloom sewing ... things such as pin tucks can be done with a twin needle as well as having a pin tuck foot . It can also be used for topstitching . Things of this nature . I hope this will help . Happy sewing!

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kathy N
    I have a top loading bobbin on my Janome and have used twin needles many times. You have to make sure that your stitch width accomodates the size of needles you have. If your machine only has a 5mm width you can't use a twin needle that needs 7mm.

    me too..no problems using one with my janome. we have so many stitches..and some look wonderful with double stitches,with different color threads..some of the designs are to tight together to use a twin needle, but it was fun trying them all out!

  3. #28

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    I use it when making pillow cases. I use it sew the end to decorate it.

  4. #29

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    I use it when making pillow cases. I use it sew the end to decorate it.

  5. #30
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    Not true, twin needles can be used in any machine that will do zig-zag. Where the bobbin is located matters not. They are primarily used in garment sewing but can be used in quilting. They make a double line of stiching. Can be used on crazy blocks with decorative stitching threads.

  6. #31
    Super Member grannypat7925's Avatar
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    I have machines that have bobbins that are drop in, vertical front loaded and slant needle and twin needles work in all of them. They make a nice cover stitch and also good for sewing jean seams.

  7. #32
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    I have a very old Kenmore and it has two vertical thread holders on the top.
    It has zig-zag capability and can accommodate as much as a 4 mm twin needle.
    The two threads do fine going through all the same guides until right before
    the needle-threading step. My machine has 2 metal loops just above the needle.
    I use the twin needle primarily for stained glass quilt blocks. The 4 mm is perfectly sized to sew the 1/4" bias fabric that serves as the "leading" in the
    stained glass.
    Just experiment and you will find out whether your machine and you can work
    with the 2 threads. It's a nice technique to have in your sewing armamentarium, but no need to stress about it. What's the worse that can happen - if the needle breaks, you can buy others. If you get a big knot
    I'll bet that's happened before. Be playful. - Judy

  8. #33
    Super Member klgreene's Avatar
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    I broke my twin needle playing around to see what it does. Now I need to get a new one. Not sure what I'm going to do with it, but one came with my machine, so I figured I could use it.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by MommaDorian
    I found this note on a website, when searching for the use of twin needles.

    Note: Twin needles are ONLY for machines with the bobbin located in the front.

    Does this mean the bobbin is inserted from the front rather than the top? My machine came with a twin needle, but the bobbin in loaded on top.
    If it was included in your machine accessories, do yourself a favor and take the time to go through your manual. Mine has a section on using all the accessories. It would depend on what your manual has to say. Kind of like the laws in one state may or may not be the same in the neighboring state. LOL

  10. #35
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    I use my twin needle for decorative type stitching. I may be wrong but if it can zig-zag it probably can use a twin needle. I use my two threads on my two thread holders, thread each thread through the tension disks, an then thread each color through the eye of one of the needles. You get a really nice effect. I also use a triple needle for this sort of thing as well. You can do really interesting stuff with a wing needle as well. If you're going to play around, might as well try everything you can think of.

    Make sure you walk your machine through the stitching pattern before taking off. You don't want to try stitching something wider than your machine allows!

  11. #36
    Senior Member fancifrock's Avatar
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    Twin needles are very helpful if you do alot of heirloom or decorative sewing. They are really fun to use.

  12. #37
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    Twin needles can be used on top loading bobbin machines. I do it frequently.

  13. #38
    Junior Member SundarKoyal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MommaDorian
    I found this note on a website, when searching for the use of twin needles.

    Note: Twin needles are ONLY for machines with the bobbin located in the front.

    Does this mean the bobbin is inserted from the front rather than the top? My machine came with a twin needle, but the bobbin in loaded on top.
    Hi, I have a Brother CS6000i as well. The area where you drop the bobbin into is actually right in front where the needle is located. On top of the machine you will see like a peg where a spool of thread goes... and you should see what looks like a circular hole on top of the machine, that is where you insert another "peg" type plastic thingy (they give you that as well) it is for a second spool of thread to be used with the TWIN needle. I hope this helps.

  14. #39
    Senior Member pinebeltquilter's Avatar
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    I bought a twin needle for my Bernina. It makes the prettiest pin tucks on batiste material. Or really on any type material. The points are close together, so the bobbin thread pulls a small pucker to make it look like tucks. I love mine.

  15. #40
    Super Member chamby's Avatar
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    So what about using a twin needle to stitch in the ditch on a lap quilt???

  16. #41
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chamby
    So what about using a twin needle to stitch in the ditch on a lap quilt???
    Well, by default that SID would need to be renamed to STD as in Straddle the Ditch. Not sure about the method but I don't like the acronym. lol

  17. #42
    Super Member chamby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadQuilter
    Quote Originally Posted by chamby
    So what about using a twin needle to stitch in the ditch on a lap quilt???
    Well, by default that SID would need to be renamed to STD as in Straddle the Ditch. Not sure about the method but I don't like the acronym. lol
    Has anyone tried this with the twin needle? I am thinking about it. I just do not want to have to rip it all out if it does not work. Plus it is a christmas gift for my nephew.

  18. #43
    Member BARBISBOSS's Avatar
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    I use my twin needle for pintucking and also using 2 different threads with different stitches that come with your machine, there is also a pintucking foot you can use. Just check the with of the foot before use fancy stitches. Ihave a janome 3500 and its max with is 7 but when using twin needles i use a 5 width.

  19. #44
    Super Member wraez's Avatar
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    That is curious.

    I have a Kenmore that uses a double needle and bobbin goes in at the bottom sideways.

    I have a Janome with a top drop down bobbin and the operator's manual says I can use a double needle.

    I have used it many times in the old Kenmore, just recently thinking of using it on my Janome but haven't yet.

    warm quilt hugs, sue in CA

  20. #45
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    The twin needle, and even the triple needles, each take a separate top thread, but they share the same one and only bobbin thread on the back.
    Just wanted to mention that.
    .

  21. #46
    Power Poster MamaBear61's Avatar
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    Twin needles make awesome decorative stitches to edge pillowcases, placemats etc. I took a class on it when I got my Pfaff 7550 several years ago and loved the look it can create.

  22. #47
    Junior Member Sewingyankee's Avatar
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    A twin needle is used in heirloom sewing to make pintucks.

  23. #48
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MommaDorian
    I have a 'twin needle' in the stuff that came with my machine. Can someone tell me what it's for?
    You can make two rows of stitching( which look like a coverstitch)
    which are evenly apart for the entire length of the sewing. Embroidery can look more interesting if you put two different colours in the needles. Some twin needles have a wing needle on one side and make interesting hole or hem work.

  24. #49
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    I also have a double needle with my Bernina machine. Bobbin loads in the front. Nancy's Notions has a great video on how to use the double needle. I have not tried it yet - but saved the info. You should be able to find it on her web site.

  25. #50
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AnnaK
    Can someone tell me how one threads a twin needle? I've never used it but have been curious. Do you need two thread sources? And do you take both threads thru all the same channels. If so, how do they not get tangled up in 'the works'? And how does one bobbin take care of 2 stitches. What does the bottom look like? So many questions. A tutorial would be great. Please?
    You need to have two different sources, then thread through all the same channels except when you come to the thread guides just above the needle. Most sewing machines have two thread guides just above the needle. Thread one colour through the left hand guide and into the left hand needle, and then the other thread through the right hand guide and needle. Be careful not to make a stitch that is too big for the foot or the needle plate when you use double needles or you will have breakages. They are great for top stitching even rows of sewing, pintucks sewing bias tape and decorative stitches with two differently coloured threads.

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