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Thread: Tying a quilt - Using a curved needle - Hints?

  1. #1
    Super Member Yvonne's Avatar
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    I grabbed some crochet thread this afternoon and a curved needle and thought I'd get a start on a quilt I have on the frame. Well, holding that curved needle is posing a problem. Hmm. I'm not sure just how to grasp the needle to be the most effective, I guess is the problem. :oops: I think the needle will make the whole process much easier but there's going to be a "learning curve" for sure! Why is everything difficult? I've googled working with curved needles and tying a quilt and the curved needle google came up with making sutures! Yuck! Guess all I can do is practice!

    Have any of used a curved needle and do you have any suggestions? :idea: I've heard they are supposed to make this tying process much easier and faster but so far, not!

    Guess I could go back to that old straight needle, huh? :?: No! Someone here will know just what to do, I'm sure of it!

    Thanks in advance for all your assistance! It is most appreciated! :lol:

  2. #2
    Moderator tlrnhi's Avatar
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    I've tied MANY quilts. I too was told the curved needle was easier. Nope, can't do it. I have a small straight needle I use that works great.

  3. #3
    Super Member Yvonne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlrnhi
    I've tied MANY quilts. I too was told the curved needle was easier. Nope, can't do it. I have a small straight needle I use that works great.
    Rats! I was sure there was a really simple way to maneuver that needle and you'd know how! Okay, off to find a bigger eyed straight needle.

    Thanks for confirming it's not just me that can't deal with that needle.

  4. #4
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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  5. #5
    Super Member mary quite contrary's Avatar
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    I've used one. I can only tell you how I did it. I have no idea what the "right" way is.

    I had my thumb on the inside of the curve and rocked it so the point was going into the fabric and I was pushing it towards me. If this doesn't make sense I'll see if I can find one and do some pictures.

  6. #6
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    I use the curved needle when I tie. I will admit that sometimes it isn't the easiest needle to use, but in my opinion is a lot easier than the straight needles. Maybe you could put a couple practice block sandwiches together and practice. Maybe, it will turn out that like Terri, you would be better off with a straight needle.

  7. #7
    Super Member Yvonne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mary quite contrary
    I've used one. I can only tell you how I did it. I have no idea what the "right" way is.

    I had my thumb on the inside of the curve and rocked it so the point was going into the fabric and I was pushing it towards me. If this doesn't make sense I'll see if I can find one and do some pictures.
    Okay. I'll try this. I was going right to left but perhaps towards me will be easier. It's the grip on the needle that's bugging me. I'll put my little thumb on the inside curve and go for it.

    Thimblebug, I did see that site. Alas, it didn't have the information I was looking for.

    Pocoellie, Practice? Ah, shucks! I wanted to be the expert right off the bat! Ha! I know better! really! Basically this quilt is my practice quilt. I figure by the time I finish I'll either really like tying or not. One way or the other I will know!

  8. #8
    Susie T's Avatar
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    The curved needle makes me feel as though I am handicapped at first, but like everyone says, you get your bearings and the momentum builds, then you are just singing along. Maybe your fingers are too smooth and you can't get a good handle on the needle, or your needle is too small-they come in many sizes.

    I do this when the quilt is still stretched on the floor or table. The under surface stops the needle, that's when you push up. Similar to hand quilting, when the needle penetrates the fabric and reaches your finger/thimble.

    I used the high-loft batting in the last two quilts that I tied, and the look and feel of a puffier quilt is well worth the effort.

  9. #9
    Super Member sewjoyce's Avatar
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    I've always used a curved needle when I tie quilts. It was a little awkward at first but soon got the hang of it! (I was always bending my straight needles -- don't ask :oops: :oops: :oops: )

  10. #10
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    My guild makes a lot of tied quilts for charity. We use a in and out stitch making the stitches about 6 inches long, not stopping until we run out of thread. We cut the stitches and tie. Needlenose pliers are a must to pull the the heavy thread through the layers.

  11. #11
    Super Member Pam S's Avatar
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    My quilt group makes a lot of quilts for charity that we tie. I like to use a curved needle but some of the other ladies just can't get the hang of it. When I try to use a straight needle now, my stitches end up huge. We tie ours when they're laying out across three banquet tables (on risers to save our backs) so the quilt is not stretched taut like it would be in a hoop or frame and it gives (we tape or clamp the backing to the table but just baste the top and batting). Maybe that's why it's easier - I never tried it with a taut surface. I just grasp the needle somewhere in the curve and push like with a straight needle. I go left to right, but I'm left-handed.

  12. #12
    community benefactor Knot Sew's Avatar
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    It's all in the wrist. I put a long piece string or yarn on the neddle. Double. I go down then back up. much like hand quilting. I go about 4 inches and do it again. and do that till I run out of thread. I do this for a section of the quilt. Then cut and tie You have 4 strings at each. Easy peasy...clear as mud :wink:

    quiltbug.com/Articles/tying-a-quilt.htm -

  13. #13
    Super Member Yvonne's Avatar
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    Thank you everyone! I appreciate your willingness to share the "secrets of the curved needle!" I have made 4 stitches this evening. Whoopee! Yep! Definitely going to have a "learning curve" here! I think my stitches are way too large. The knots are fine. I will persevere and will post a picture if and when I ever finish this project.
    Off I go!

  14. #14
    Junior Member Pinkrose4664's Avatar
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    Along this subject, how do you tie the threads so that the knot does not loosen after washing?

  15. #15
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    i can't explain why but i use the curved needle and i love it

  16. #16
    Moderator tlrnhi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinkrose4664
    Along this subject, how do you tie the threads so that the knot does not loosen after washing?
    I use a square knot. Make sure it's really tight. I'll also tell whoever is getting it to check the knots every once in a while

  17. #17
    Super Member Yvonne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinkrose4664
    Along this subject, how do you tie the threads so that the knot does not loosen after washing?
    check out this video.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PeaIyAyg_cs



  18. #18
    Junior Member Pinkrose4664's Avatar
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    oh my gosh! I can acutally do that one!

    Thanks ever so

  19. #19
    community benefactor Knot Sew's Avatar
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    Its like a regular knot but over twice two times :D

  20. #20

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    Yvonne. Surgeons do a really fine tie with the curved needle. They use a hemostat and tilt the needle up to puncture the fabric (skin) then immediately rockit back....then they tie it right over left then left over right. I seen several quilters do it this way. Hold the stat straight out in front of you and add the needle at rt a`rt angle.

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