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Thread: Uh-oh.. what now???

  1. #1
    Member JaneH's Avatar
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    Uh-oh.. what now???

    I'm starting my first ever quilt--- a baby quilt for my grandson (who is due in June). I think I'd like to check with some experienced quilters first. My first question is what do I do with the edges? I assume that I cut the batting the size of the smallest piece, which in this case is the panel piece. The back of the quilt (an all-over print) is slightly larger (maybe 2" on each side?) than the top, so could I just fold it over to make a little bias-type edge? I hope this question makes sense. I've attached some pictures below to show what I'm working with (I hope they get bigger if you click on them). Thanks for any advice, tips, or comments..... Name:  Front pc.jpg
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    Last edited by JaneH; 03-09-2012 at 07:38 AM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member lenette's Avatar
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    Usually cut batting larger than the front, same for the backing. About 2 inches all around. They seem to shrink a bit when you quilt them together. Folding the back over to the front is definitely a way to finish it. But, that is not called bias. The fabric used from the back is definitely on the straight of grain. Check some YouTube videos if you feel you need more help. They are great. You must quilt it by tying or stitching before you bind the edges.
    Lenette

  3. #3
    Super Member ArtsyOne's Avatar
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    Another option for a beginning quilter is to do the pillowcase method which supposes minimal quilting. Cut the back and the front fabrics the same size, with the batting just about 1/2" smaller. Lay the two fabrics right sides together, with the batting on top and then sew around 3-1/2 sides. From the opening, grab the two far ends of everything and then pull through the opening. You now have what amounts to a pillowcase with batting inside. Do some stitching around the edges of the center panel and the next border, then close the opening. Simple and quick.
    A fabric stash is always missing that one fabric needed to finish the quilt on which you're working.

  4. #4
    Super Member JUNEC's Avatar
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    I am not sure what you are asking, but your batting & the quilt backing needs to be bigger than your top - DO NOT CUT ANYTHING UNTIL YOU QUILT IT -
    You need to sandwich your top, batting & backing by either pinning it together or basting it - you squaring up & binding are done after the quilted is quilting.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Linnie's Avatar
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    Very very cute

  6. #6
    Super Member cctx.'s Avatar
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    Very cute.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Learner747's Avatar
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    ArtsyOne, your pillow case technique is brilliant! Thanks for sharing.

  8. #8
    Member JaneH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JUNEC View Post
    I am not sure what you are asking, but your batting & the quilt backing needs to be bigger than your top - DO NOT CUT ANYTHING UNTIL YOU QUILT IT -
    You need to sandwich your top, batting & backing by either pinning it together or basting it - you squaring up & binding are done after the quilted is quilting.
    Oops...too late on cutting the batting. I cut it already but about 1/4" larger than the panel. Since I posted the original question, I found one YouTube tutorial on how to finish the edges. I think it's similar to ArtsyOne's pillow case approach.

    However, after looking at it all afternoon, I'm now considering cutting the backing fabric the same size as the front panel and using the cut off portion (which will be a nice strip) to make a binding. Argh... I think I'm going to have to sleep on this one before I jump in and do something I'll regret. In the meantime, I really appreciate everyone's advice.

  9. #9
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    the quilting needs to be done before you cut the backing the same as the front- or it will wind up being smaller than the front when you quilt it---you layer the (sandwich---backing, batting, top---baste either with pins or with thread or with a spray basting----quilt it---then square it up- trim it even and add a binding-
    or you can fold excess from the back to the front and machine stitch it as a binding---or you can put the top & back facing---stitch around 3 sides- turn right side out----quilt- then finish the final edge---but if you are going to bind it you need to quilt it first---and the backing needs to be larger than the top to quilt it
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  10. #10
    Senior Member kclausing's Avatar
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    Use a spray baste, the quilt. When you are done quilting, the decide whether to trim or fold over.
    I do not prefer pillowcase method because things can shift during quilting and if youve already sewn the edges you may have issues.

  11. #11
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    I quilted this same panel with a "cow jumped over the moon" pantograph and it was really cute when finished. You have been given some good advice. Good luck with your project.

  12. #12
    Super Member Havplenty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArtsyOne View Post
    Another option for a beginning quilter is to do the pillowcase method which supposes minimal quilting. Cut the back and the front fabrics the same size, with the batting just about 1/2" smaller. Lay the two fabrics right sides together, with the batting on top and then sew around 3-1/2 sides. From the opening, grab the two far ends of everything and then pull through the opening. You now have what amounts to a pillowcase with batting inside. Do some stitching around the edges of the center panel and the next border, then close the opening. Simple and quick.

    and a perfect solution. i was thinking simple and quick and this fits.
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  13. #13
    Super Member Havplenty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kclausing View Post
    Use a spray baste, the quilt. When you are done quilting, the decide whether to trim or fold over.
    I do not prefer pillowcase method because things can shift during quilting and if youve already sewn the edges you may have issues.
    i used this method with a bunch of cat beds that i made and nothing shifted. you anchor the batting down by sewing around the edges so that is does not shift. once i turned the sandwich inside out, i sewed around the edges to make sure it did not move and then i did a few tacking stitches in the middle so that the pads would endure washing. i have washed the ones i kept for my furbabies with no batting issues.
    My Quiltboard Blog
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  14. #14
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    Good luck in whatever you decide to do and congrats on the little one on its way

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    Or try tying the quilt with floss, that makes for a cute quilt also. But i like Arstyone idea also.
    Mary

  16. #16
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    What an exciting time for you with the grandchild on the way. I'm sure that whatever method you use to make this sweet quilt the baby and his mom will love it. The only thing I can think to add to everyone else's suggestions is that before you sandwich and start sewing, it would be a good idea to iron both the top and the back using quite a bit of starch. A few minutes in the clothes dryer will take the wrinkles out of the batting (if it is cotton). This will help you a great deal in keeping everything straight. After it's done you'll want to wash the starch out of the finished quilt before using it for the baby. If you do decide to bind it, you would probably find it easier to manage a bias binding. This means the fabric is cut in strips across the diagonal. It will be more flexible than the straight trimmings from your backing. You might have to buy more fabric, but probably less than a yard. You could use a contrasting fabric, such as a solid color from the design. You should be able to find good instructions for binding both on this board and on Youtube, or perhaps there is an experienced quilter near you who could guide you through the steps initially. It's much easier to show than to explain. Best wishes for the wee one to be.
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  17. #17
    Super Member hperttula123's Avatar
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    Your panel is cute and it's going to make a wonderful quilt. The easiest way is to the birthing method(you can search it here or on youtube to get a tutorial). You could quilt it also, but the batting and backing need to be larger than the top. It will shrink up a little when you quilt it. Afterwards, you can square it up(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KPlo79fz6P0). After that, you can add your binding. Just take a deep breath and go slow and take your time. Remember, quilting is fun!!!! There are lots of videos and tutes to show how do do all of it. If you need more help, ask. There are tons of people here that are willing to help the best they can.
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  18. #18
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    Personally, I like to bring the back to the front when finishing. I think it looks nicer.

  19. #19
    Power Poster solstice3's Avatar
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    Love the panel. Some great guidance from the ladies. Please post a pic when finished

  20. #20
    Super Member callen's Avatar
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    Very cute fabric. Will make a super quilt. Best of luck on your endeavour.
    Dance like no one is watching

  21. #21
    Super Member chuckbere15's Avatar
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    Maybe you local quilt shop could fix you up with a new found friend who would be willing to show you how to prepare for the quilting process. There are some steps and/or tricks that you need to learn in what ever method you choose. For example, if you ever send out a quilt top to be quilted by a long arm quilter, your batting and backing should be 4" bigger on all sides as the quilting process could eat up an inch or so depending on the amount of quilting.

    My first quilts my mom taught me the flip over from the back to finish them. The way mom taught me was if you wanted a 2" binding you need 4" of material from the back as you would double the binding. Also, with this method make sure that you put the cutting mat between the backing and batting when squaring up the top and batting otherwise you will cut the backing off. Ask me how I learned this lesson. When making a quilt that will be used and abused with love, I recommend folding over from the back method or machine sewing the binding. If the quilt is going to be a heirloom quilt you should always use binding sewn on the front and then hand sew on the back. I still have not done that yet, but in the near future I will have to learn how to hand sew binding.

    Basting the quilt top, batting, and backing is extremely important. If you are going to pin, you need to place a pin every 3 to 4 inches apart. I can't help you with hand basting with a tread and needle as I never have done that. If you choose to spray baste, I would recommend outside if possiable. If spray basting indoors you need to be extra careful and cover everything near where you are working as the over spray will stick everywhere. Also, make sure you have plenty of ventilation as the fumes will over power you. Another thing I learned, the hard way, is that spray basting requires very little; a little goes a long way is a good rule to remember. If you spray a lot, it make the fabric pucker and you will get puckers. Again, ask me how I learned that lesson. I also used pins every 15" or so to make sure things didn't shift.
    also, quilt from the center and work your way out if doing by hand or domestic machine. Long arms have their own set of guidelines.

    I would search YouTube for tutorials as there is a vast amount of help from videos. By the look of things you are going to be a pro in no time at all. Good job!
    The Quilting Bear

  22. #22
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    The pillowcasing or enveloping technique is the easiest method that waas described then you can quilt tit afterwards. Use this method for my preemie quilts.

  23. #23
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
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    for a beginning quilter, the pillowcase method will be the easiest and fastest.....it will allow you to do very minimal quilting after it is turned right side out, or simply tied if you prefer......whichever you decide, please don't hesitate to ask us any questions.....there will be many of us who will give you the answers you need to make a beautiful quilt......and by the time you are done, you will be addicted to quilting!....have fun making your quilt!

  24. #24
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    I've just done several baby panels this way. When done with front & back from flannel, I didn't use batting at all. after the quilt was turned right side out, I buttonhole stitched (by machine) around the figures to make it look like applique . If you don't have a buttonhole stitch, you could use a fine zigzag to achieve the result. The stitching around the pictures is all the quilting that was needed
    johans, Michigan's UP, Hiawatha National Forest West

  25. #25
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    I agree that YouTube is the way to go. I also like the idea of doing the pillowcase method. For a small quilt, it's very fast and looks great!! Be proud of yourself. You made this quilt on your own. Now, start using this site and finding out everything about quilting. I've learned so much here. Also, if you type in "Jenny Doan" on YouTube, a lot comes up. She's my hero. She teaches the "easy" way to piece fabric. Her tricks are wonderful. She's the queen of making blocks the easy way. Good luck. Very nice quilt!!
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
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