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Thread: to use pins or permanent basting spray

  1. #1
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    Question to use pins or permanent basting spray

    I am debating about how to quilt my first full size quilt top. I have the basting spray, but not a lot of room to work to put layers together. Don't know if I should just find a local quilter to do it for me or try it on my own. Any suggestions? I live in Vegas and if I take it out would like to do so locally.

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    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    Can't really help you there. I use both the bent safety pins or basting spray. When I don't have enough space, I find a place where I can baste it. Many LQS offer their class space to do that.

    I can't send my quilts out to be quilted by someone else because they would not be "my" quilts any longer. So I practice, practice, practice to get better at that FMQ. I wish I could send some out coz I would get more done. So if you feel comfortable with that, good luck. I know that Charisma from the QB is a fabulous quilter. Maybe someone else can point you to a local quilter.
    Martina
    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Fabric!

  3. #3
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    I forgot to post picture first time. Since this is so busy, would you advise to use fairly plain quilting pattern?
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    Senior Member COYOTEMAGIC's Avatar
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    I use Elmer's Glue. Have used it for years. Check out post #51 of this thread. http://www.quiltingboard.com/main-f1...t180790-2.html if you lay yours out on the floor or table, I suggest using a cheap plastic table cloth to protect those things . I used to use my kitchen floor before I got so many critters running around. I've got basting pins, a basting gun, and have done thread basting, but after I did Elmer's for the first time, I never looked back.

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    Do you use just regular white Elmer's glue? And is it permanent after it dries? I would have to use table since I have bad knees and can't crawl around on floor.

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    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
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    Look up Sharon schambers utube on sandwiching it may give you an idea. If using glue you need plenty of fresh air.
    Finished is better than a UFO

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    Super Member quiltsRfun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glendel1944 View Post
    Do you use just regular white Elmer's glue? And is it permanent after it dries? I would have to use table since I have bad knees and can't crawl around on floor.
    It's the Elmer's school glue which washes out. You wouldn't want to use a permanent glue or spray adhesive.

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    Senior Member Dalronix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glendel1944 View Post
    Do you use just regular white Elmer's glue?
    I would love to know the answer to that as no one was able to answer my question here:

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/main-f1...ml#post6248015
    ~: Ron :~

    "You cut up fabric then sew it back together again? Really?"

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    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    Dalronix, use the Elmer's Washable Glue. It often says "School Glue" on it also. It is white in color, not clear.

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    I love the 505 basting spray.

  11. #11
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    I use spray basting now, and sometimes I am not able to baste on the dining room table or the floor, so the last time I did it I used my bed. The bed is king size, I took off the bedding, put on an old sheet, smoothed everything the best I could and spray basted the quilt on the bed. I worked out very well and basted very quickly. And on the plus size I did not get a sore back.

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    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
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    The quilt has so much color and design I would probably just do an edge to edge design and not detract from the quilt itself. More and more Im sending quilts out for edge to edge. When I do a quilt that wants more, I have it custom quilted. Important to me at this stage of life and health to get these quilts done! We have amazing quilters here in St. George - where Las Vegas comes to shop!

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    I put a portable table next to my dining room table( covered with old flannel backed plastic table cloth). I tape down edges of whatever will fit on table and sandwich with big safety pins. When done,I just move some more onto the table. I don't like fumes from basting spray in the house,but I do use 505on table runners,smaller items.
    Life may not be the party we planned for,but while we are here we should dance!

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    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I agree with Elmer's Washable School Glue. I learned with pin basting, have used thread basting, and have tried spray basting, but once I tried the Elmer's Washable School Glue I will never do anything but. I do it in sections on my dining room table. I don't even tape anything. Six quilts in, one of them a big lap size, I am hooked.
    Alyce

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    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glendel1944 View Post
    I am debating about how to quilt my first full size quilt top. I have the basting spray, but not a lot of room to work to put layers together. Don't know if I should just find a local quilter to do it for me or try it on my own. Any suggestions? I live in Vegas and if I take it out would like to do so locally.
    Your thread title mentions *permanent* basting spray. Basting spray for quilts is not permanent; it is repositionable and (supposedly, anyway) washes out in the laundry.

    I would either spray baste or baste with Elmer's white washable school glue. I would lay a large flat sheet over a large bed and use that for either method. (Toss the sheet in the laundry afterwards. Both will wash out.)

    There are quite a few threads on the QB about basting with spray or with Elmer's. Here's a link to an Elmer's glue basting tutorial with photos:
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/tutoria...e-t208057.html

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    If you have not used the basting spray before, you might want to try it on a small project first. It took me awhile to get the hang of it but now I do pretty good. I start in the middle of the quilt, fold back the bottom half and then spray about 12 inches across; then I put that part in place smoothing a lot as I go. Then, I move onto the next section. I find this works much better for me than spraying the whole thing at once. Remember you can pick up and move the material if it doesn't lay right.

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    Thank each of you for your input. It is really nice to have such a great support group. I am new to serious quilting but have been sewing 50+ years. I have made baby & lap quilts but never got into it whole heartedly until lately. Now addicted.

  18. #18
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
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    I use basting pins. Have not tried the Elmer's glue method..maybe will on a small project to see how it goes. I am really sensitive to the basting spray, even in an area with good ventilation, so don't use that.

  19. #19
    cjr
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    Lots of good long armers in vegas. Check with any of the quilt stores.
    www.etsy.com/shop/quiltinglycaroline

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    I use basting spray and pins. I have a regular machine with a tiny throat so I have to handle and roll my quilts alot when quilting. It may be overkill but it works. Our last Guild Meeting someone suggested using the insulation foam covered with flannel as a pinning board also, not just a design wall. They drape half over the board, smooth it out, pin then turn it around, slide it a little and pin the other half all while it is leaning up. I am anxious to try it, sure beats the floor.

  21. #21
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    basting spray and glue wash out after the quilt is quilted- unless you are making a wall hanging that will not be laundered you would not want to use anything that would be permanent. fusible washes out too. you can use glue, spray, fusible batting, pins or thread to baste your quilt for quilting. for quilting your quilt on your own you could use wavy lines down your braids, or down the braid segments. stitch in the ditch, with something curvy in the sashing strips...most any pattern would work on your quilt- it is 'busy enough' to hide any boo-boo's you may make and be a good project to 'practice' on. if you want to send it to a long-arm quilter check with local quilt shops to see who they recommend.
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    QM
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    I found immediately that for me, basting spray is a terrible idea. Even out of doors in a light breeze, it set off my asthma. I pin baste, but mean to try glue basting.

  23. #23
    Senior Member COYOTEMAGIC's Avatar
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    Basic Elmer's School glue or Glue-All. Doesn't even have to be Elmer's just as long as it's washable. I don't use the spray adhesives because they set off my asthma.

  24. #24
    Super Member mamaw's Avatar
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    I use 505 basting spray and then pin lightly to enforce the hold while quilting. It doesn't have a strong odor and is safe to use indoors too. I wash and dry the quilt after to remove the 505 and give it the "quilt" look. Am always satisfied with the results.

  25. #25
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    I tried the basting spray and it's a sticky mess if you aren't very careful. Tried the pins and that's not for me. Basting works too but has to be taken out either as you go or after quilting. Try the Elmer's Washable School Glue. It's cheap and easy to wash off if you get it somewhere you don't want it. Lots of people love it. I have the glue but just haven't tried it yet.

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