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Thread: Used longarms with frame

  1. #1
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    Smile Used longarms with frame

    I am looking for a used or refurbished longarm with frame. I have never longarmed and have watched YouTube videos of it and have been checking out things online but I need one that is great for beginners on a 10 foot frame with the ability to make it smaller if I need to. Any suggestions?
    Empress Mona (teeheehee)

  2. #2
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I like my Voyager 17/Stretch Hinterberg frame setup. It's a good combo for a beginning frame quilter. Mine has 10-foot rollers which is pretty standard since these are the easiest to purchase from a big box store. To make it smaller, all you do is purchase shorter rollers and switch them out. Places to look are:
    http://www.hinterberg.com ($4,000 for a refurbed Voyager with stitch regulator and frame)
    http://www.houseofhanson.com/formerlyowned.html
    http://www.longarmuniversity.com/machines_for_sale.htm

    There is also a nice Yahoo group called HinterbergQuilters where you can find fellow owners offering info and support.

  3. #3
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    Do you want a LONG arm like a 24 or 36" gammil or a mid-arm like an 18/19" handiquilter or baby lock? How much are you willing to spend? Do you want to use it free hand or do you want an automated system? These are all consuderations

  4. #4
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    I dont know. Is the 24-36 the throat size? What does it matter if you are using a frame? I am assuming that free hand means that you have handles and direct the machine in a free motion way but moving the needle instead of the fabric?
    Empress Mona (teeheehee)

  5. #5
    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    I recommend at LEAST trying one. Actually loading a quilt on and giving it whirl. Watching you tube videos is really not the way to decide to make this investment. We have some posters here who realized that loading a quilt was something they didn't want to do so did not pursue getting a longarm. Even a used mid arm setup (16 to 18" inch throat space) will run a few thousand dollars. I recommend finding a dealer or quilt show near you where you can actually try one out. Some LQS have rental programs where you take a training class before they let you rent. Watching youtube videos is really not the way to make this kind of decision. Most people research longarm machines for about a year, trying different models etc before actually deciding what to purchase.

  6. #6
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I highly, highly recommend you check around your area for longarms that are available for rent by the hour. This will give you a much better sense of what you want and how it works.

  7. #7
    Junior Member qltgrose's Avatar
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    I agree with Peckish, go to a large quilt show and try various manufacturers...and look for a place that will rent you time on theirs to get some "real" time on one to see how they work. I also agree with Prism, the Voyager/Hinterberg set up is one of the least expensive mid arms. I have one and I am still bonding with mine

  8. #8
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info!
    Empress Mona (teeheehee)

  9. #9
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    Great idea. I didnt know you could rent the use of one.
    Empress Mona (teeheehee)

  10. #10
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    Thank you for the advice. I have decided that this is the best option. I will check around to see who does rental of time and see what I can learn.
    Empress Mona (teeheehee)

  11. #11
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    I agree shop around and test, test, test, machines!!! Also be sure you enough room for your frame, ect.

  12. #12
    Junior Member An Arm Long's Avatar
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    "I dont know. Is the 24-36 the throat size? What does it matter if you are using a frame? I am assuming that free hand means that you have handles and direct the machine in a free motion way but moving the needle instead of the fabric? "

    On a longarm, you are quilting a strip the length of your frame. The width of that strip is determined by the length of the throat on your machine.
    Beth in Maryland

  13. #13
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mona202 View Post
    Is the 24-36 the throat size? What does it matter if you are using a frame?
    It matters a great deal. If your machine has a 9" throat (like my first one, and it was very frustrating), you will only be able to quilt about 5" deep. Remember you have to take into account the space that the rolled-up quilt takes in the throat of the machine as you advance it. The larger the quilt, the more space it uses as you progress. If your blocks are 10", it would be very difficult to quilt a design in them in only 5". With an 18 or 24 inch throat, you have a lot more space available to quilt larger blocks, plus added space for the quilt. Having said that, there are some quilters who don't care for the larger throats because it's too far to reach reach the back of the quilt. Testing different throat sizes will help you determine what you're comfortable with.

    Another thing I highly recommend is a stitch regulator. It speeds up and slows down with the motion of the machine, so your stitches are always the same size.

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