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Thread: Using freezer paper as a template for fmq.

  1. #1
    Senior Member ruby2shoes's Avatar
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    Using freezer paper as a template for fmq.

    Can I iron a freezer paper motif onto my quilt top, fmq around it and then remove/peel the freezer paper off without damaging my quilt top or leaving any residue?

  2. #2
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    If the fabric can take the hot iron, it should be fine on regular cotton fabric. If the fabric has a surface treatment like metallic, fairy frost or glitter, it may come off when you peal off the paper. As with anything added to a quilt surface, try a a sample on a scrap first.

  3. #3
    Senior Member ruby2shoes's Avatar
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    Thankyou Tartan.

  4. #4
    Super Member GEMRM's Avatar
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    I've used it lots - works fine. Sometimes if your motif is large, you may have to put a pin or two in, as you manipulate your quilt sandwich around, it may lift a bit.
    A husband is the perfect confidant to tell your secrets to - he can't reveal them to anyone else because he wasn't really listening when you told him!

  5. #5
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    It can work ... a few you may want to consider ...
    * when you "peel" it off, careful or you could disturb, even pull the stitches
    * you may also end up with crumbs of the paper in the stitching
    * FMQing on the sandwich with paper on top will have a different feel to it than without
    * some use tissue paper rather than the "hard" freezer paper

    As already said ... do a trial run first to help you feel good about it and to get your technique figured out, before committing to your "real" project.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member ruby2shoes's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone...yep, I wasn't planning to stitch on the freezer paper, I want to fm stitch around it. I have a particular shape in my main blocks and I want to mimic/do an outline of that shape throughout my negative space.

  7. #7
    Super Member bjchad's Avatar
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    Iíve done this slightly differently. I iron on the freezer paper, then use chalk to rub over the edges, then pull up the paper. You get a negative image when you pull up the freezer paper and have no chance of stitching through the paper. You can chalk each one as you come to it, so the image lasts long enough to quilt. You can also add internal detail if you want with this method and reuse the templates a number of times.

  8. #8
    Senior Member ruby2shoes's Avatar
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    Thanks bjchad that sounds like a brilliant idea! Makes good sense.

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    Yes you can, it is a great way to get better control of your design. Can be used several times if you are careful taking it off. I did Indian pots and bears on one quilt.

  10. #10
    Super Member soccertxi's Avatar
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    I have quilted on tissue paper (I wanted words to show on the back, so I quilted them backwards so they could be read!) and cut my design out of contact paper to quilt around. I was able to use it multiple times before it lost its stickiness. No residue left behind.
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    Just don't make the mistake of using a big black Sharpie as I did. The thread picked up the PERMANENT marker as it passed through my template. I used a regular pen after that.
    "The great doing of little things makes the great life." Eugena Price

  12. #12
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    I did that on a quilt for my son - sea turtle shapes scattered on the quilt. Then I did meander quilting on the whole non-covered surface. Finally, I did an outline around each of the freezer paper pieces before I took them off. The turtles stand out nicely - especially on the back. I traced the turtles with pencil around a plastic template I had made.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bjchad View Post
    I’ve done this slightly differently. I iron on the freezer paper, then use chalk to rub over the edges, then pull up the paper. You get a negative image when you pull up the freezer paper and have no chance of stitching through the paper. You can chalk each one as you come to it, so the image lasts long enough to quilt. You can also add internal detail if you want with this method and reuse the templates a number of times.
    Thanks for this suggestion...great idea!
    And thanks to ruby2shoes for the question!

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