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Thread: Using muslin

  1. #1
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    Using muslin

    I wanted to order tHe 10 in piecing squares Missouri quilt co has and has a tute on it also. The site says out of stock so I went to my local shop when I asked about them the lady said oh don't do that just cut musli draw lines that way u don't have to tear paper. Well I am a very inexperienced beginning quilter I just stood there and finally said ok. Now I know I'd need 10 in muslin squares but how far apart do I draw the Lines? They are slanted not straight.. Forgive my Silly question but it's the only way I know to find out and this group is so kind to beginners.

  2. #2
    Super Member Quiltaddict's Avatar
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    If you want to make the string quilt, I just watched the tutorial and it is very simple. You can use 10" muslin squares or just use any cotton fabric you have on hand that you may never use (as long as it is a light enough color that it won't show through your strips). You don't even need to draw lines, she didn't in the tutorial and the paper squares they sell don't have lines. Just start with a strip down the center (corner to corner) and add a strip to each side until your square is covered. Using muslin will make your quilt heavier but you don't have to pull off the paper. I have even seen people use pages from phone books (just cut to size). Pages are very thin and easy to remove. You can also get very thin typing paper if you want to go the paper route. I have been make blocks using Christmas strips left over from stockings I made a few years ago. Using many different widths and they are coming out very cute. Good luck on your project. Just go for it.

  3. #3
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    I knew someone would know! I thought there were lines. Glad to know it's easier than I thought. Thank you!!!

  4. #4
    Junior Member neenee586's Avatar
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    It's not a silly question. When I start my blocks I use a glue stick to lightly glue down the main strip face up. After that the next strip is sewn on right sides together (RST) then flip and press. Repeat this process on both sides of first strip, using different width strips to add interest. For my foundation I use any cotton (perhaps something too thin to use in a quilt) fabric I have on hand sewing to the wrong side which is usually lighter, I don't care to mess with paper and like the heavier block. If you use the same solid color for main strip that gives a different look.

    Here is a link to pix of string blocks, I hope I've helped a little. Good luck!
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&g...BuPnyAGCvoG4DQ

  5. #5
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    Great pictures!

  6. #6
    Senior Member Mickey1's Avatar
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    Thank you Neenee586. It was fun looking at all the possibilities.

  7. #7
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    I just completed a string quilt - I draw two diagonal lines about 2 1/2" apart on each square - Then stitch and flip fabric on each side of the line. When the blocks are put together it looks like there is a white path around each block. This is such a simple and fast quilt to do. The pieces in mine were chosen because they were odd cuts or less than a fat quarter. It didn't matter if they were brights, civil war, pastel or dark - it turned out nice.

  8. #8
    Member SweetWoodruffs's Avatar
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    I love string quilts and usually use muslin.

  9. #9
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    I cut 9 inch squares of backing fabric 9 inch of batting then I start sewing my strips on to the batting, you have to pin the backing and batting as they will move when you are sewing I then trim all my blocks to 8.5 but you could do any measurement you wanted. I then put these blocks together QAYG. I only wish I could add a photo as I have made 5 quilts like this one a king size

  10. #10
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    thats a great idea!! I'll try one block both ways and see how it does!!! Ya'll are so great!!!!

  11. #11
    Power Poster alikat110's Avatar
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    Here is a pic of 6" blocks i just started. I cut 6" squares and am sewing as described above...it is sew easy.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #12
    Super Member bjchad's Avatar
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    I've been using deli dry waxed paper you can get at sSam's club or BJs for a foundation. You can cut it to size either by hand or with a go or sizzix cutter and it tears off very easily. It's a lot cheaper than what is sold specifically for quilting. It does not put any residue on your fabric if you iron while still on the paper.

  13. #13
    Super Member misseva's Avatar
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    If you have a very old thin, almost worn out sheet it makes good foundation squares and the cost is minimal. I find some at yard sales, etc. You can get a lot of foundation blocks out of one sheet.
    TwandasMom

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by neenee586 View Post
    It's not a silly question. When I start my blocks I use a glue stick to lightly glue down the main strip face up. After that the next strip is sewn on right sides together (RST) then flip and press. Repeat this process on both sides of first strip, using different width strips to add interest. For my foundation I use any cotton (perhaps something too thin to use in a quilt) fabric I have on hand sewing to the wrong side which is usually lighter, I don't care to mess with paper and like the heavier block. If you use the same solid color for main strip that gives a different look.

    Here is a link to pix of string blocks, I hope I've helped a little. Good luck!
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&g...BuPnyAGCvoG4DQ
    What a wonderful site - so sew many ideas! Yikes.

  15. #15
    Member janbland's Avatar
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    My Aunt gave me an antique quilt that was pieced on muslin and it didn't wear well. Bonnie Hunter recommends piecing on paper rather than muslin. She recommends using phone book pages or cheap sketch pads from the dollar store. I have been saving the light weight paper that companies use for packing materials. I iron it flat and cut it into squares. It's amazing how many squares you can get out of paper that would otherwise end up in the recycle bin.

  16. #16
    Junior Member RGAY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Txsuthrn View Post
    I wanted to order tHe 10 in piecing squares Missouri quilt co has and has a tute on it also. The site says out of stock so I went to my local shop when I asked about them the lady said oh don't do that just cut musli draw lines that way u don't have to tear paper. Well I am a very inexperienced beginning quilter I just stood there and finally said ok. Now I know I'd need 10 in muslin squares but how far apart do I draw the Lines? They are slanted not straight.. Forgive my Silly question but it's the only way I know to find out and this group is so kind to beginners.
    The only silly question is the one you don't ask! This board membership is so helpful and knowledgeable! Glad you asked this question - many will benefit from all the responses, including me, another newbie to this board!

  17. #17
    Super Member Snooze2978's Avatar
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    As I had a bolt of muslin, I went that way. Yes it is a bit heavier than usual with 2 layers of fabric but as I'm making these as lap quilts for elderly folks, they will enjoy the extra warmth. I starched my muslin, then cut them out to size. I'm using up a bunch of my scraps this way too. Craftsy also had the basic same pattern but smaller plus yet another one which you start with a foundation but cut off the excess afterwards. This one makes a star in the center when you put the 4 pieces together. I've made one of each so far and am on 2 more but this time I'll just leave the foundation on both of them. This is a great way to use up your scraps as they seem to multiply during the night.


    Suz in Iowa

  18. #18
    Super Member Gannyrosie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neenee586 View Post
    It's not a silly question. When I start my blocks I use a glue stick to lightly glue down the main strip face up. After that the next strip is sewn on right sides together (RST) then flip and press. Repeat this process on both sides of first strip, using different width strips to add interest. For my foundation I use any cotton (perhaps something too thin to use in a quilt) fabric I have on hand sewing to the wrong side which is usually lighter, I don't care to mess with paper and like the heavier block. If you use the same solid color for main strip that gives a different look.

    Here is a link to pix of string blocks, I hope I've helped a little. Good luck!
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&g...BuPnyAGCvoG4DQ
    wonderful tutorial, thanks I needed that.

  19. #19
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    I also use tissue paper. You can get 30 sheets that are 20"x20" for less than a $1.00. You can get 4 10" squares that are great for paper piecing. I also use the phone book pages.

  20. #20
    Super Member SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neenee586 View Post

    Here is a link to pix of string blocks, I hope I've helped a little. Good luck!
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&g...BuPnyAGCvoG4DQ
    Thanks, I had not seen that before. Lots of possibilities!

    Linda

    Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound, that saved a wretch like me. I once was lost but now am found, was blind, but now I see.
    [John Newton (1725-1807)]

    http://sewextremeseams.blogspot.com/

  21. #21
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    When foundation piecing on muslin - do you leave the muslin out to the edges or do you extend the top layer (the finished side) 1/4 inch around the edges?

  22. #22
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    Quiltaddict has some good advice. I also loved the pictures of the string quilt that was posted.

    Something you might want to consider is going to Craftsy.com. The 2012 Block of Month has two string patterns. The class is free. You can make these two blocks and decide which method you would prefer to use. Also make one block using paper.

    Always make a sample block of any quilt you want to make. I learned this the hard way. Happy quilting.


    Linda

    Sew little time and sew many ideas

  23. #23
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    If you don't want to use newsprint - old telephone books or even magazines, then I would suggest using a light weight muslin or any fabric that you might have on hand, preferably nothing too bright that would show through your strips, but any lightweight fabric would do. Personally I think I would use a white muslin for the middle diagonal strip about 2 - 2 1/2" wide, then add your strips to either side in any width your scraps dictate. I like the strip of white in the middle, as I think it makes the strips stand out more.

  24. #24
    Junior Member iwillquilt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tessagin View Post
    I also use tissue paper. You can get 30 sheets that are 20"x20" for less than a $1.00. You can get 4 10" squares that are great for paper piecing. I also use the phone book pages.
    What a great idea! Now why didn't I think of this. smh Thanks.

  25. #25
    Super Member MacThayer's Avatar
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    My choice for foundation blocks depends on the fabric I'm using. If I know a lot of the fabric has been cut on the bias, I'll use fabric, whether that be muslin, old fabric, old sheets, etc. If I'm not sure how it's been cut, I'll usually but not always choose fabric. I have used paper here, and ended up with some "wonky" blocks because the bias stretches more than those cut on the length or width of the fabric; e.g. straight grain. I've used all kinds of paper, including old telephone books, and on this point, it's whatever works for you or whatever you have on hand.

    I am not finding that string quilts done on muslin wears faster. Is it that the fabric used was cheap, and maybe the quilter was just using it up because they didn't want to make quilt blocks with it? Or do you think it has something to do with having fabric as a foundation? I'd be curious to know other people's experience with this.

    Oh, and I press and starch my muslin (fabric, etc) foundation pieces before I use them. Helps keep them square.

    To: Bearisgray -- I entend my material out to the edge, including 1/4 inch seam allowance. I've not done it the other way, but it seems to me that if you're only attaching muslin to muslin, it would be much less strong. Also, I don't know how you could solve the problem of the edges of the fabric strips sticking up on the top, not being sewn down into the top. I hope that was clear.
    Last edited by MacThayer; 05-04-2013 at 01:27 PM. Reason: Adding material
    MacThayer

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