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Thread: Warmer!

  1. #1
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    Warmer!

    I have now made a couple of quilts but they are so thin and light. I used warm and natural for batting. My husband wants me to put the heavier quilt that I had bought before I started quilting. I was just wondering if there is nothing out there that you know of that would be warmer. My DH is a freeze baby!

  2. #2
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    If you like W & N, put a layer of thin polyester on top of it. Wool is warmer, but very pricey to me. I've heard poly alone is warmer than cotton, but haven't tried it.

  3. #3
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    If cost isn't an issue, you might consider wool batting. FWIW, the quilts that I have gifted with W&N have been described by the recipients as being very warm. Maybe just double up the quilts? More reason to quilt!

  4. #4
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I would also recommend wool. I've heard of folks who use 2 batts. A layer of W&N on the bottom, then a layer of wool.
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  5. #5
    Super Member quilt addict's Avatar
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    The warmth is created by the air space in the batting, if you want more warmth you need something with more air spaces to provide that insulation. So a higher loft batting will provide more warmth. So you can switch to anything that is thicker that way.

    I would agree, wool is a very nice way to go but if economics are an issue then go with poly.
    Lisa

  6. #6
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    You can also use a layer of fleece, for batting.
    Neesie


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  7. #7
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess View Post
    I would also recommend wool. I've heard of folks who use 2 batts. A layer of W&N on the bottom, then a layer of wool.
    Gosh, I wonder what that looks like after washing. They shrink at different rates.

    I agree with the wool option, and it's not all THAT expensive, but if your DH is looking for heavy in addition to warm, you won't get that from wool unless you use old blankets. Wool batting is very light in weight, just as poly is.
    Last edited by ghostrider; 11-06-2012 at 11:20 AM.
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  8. #8
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    Maybe put a couple layers of warm and natural. I've made several quilts with warm and natural and while they may be "thin" they certainly are light and I've never had a problem with being cold under it.

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    Does he want warmer quilt or fluffier quilt(that he thinks is warmer) A lot of commercial made quilts are very fluffy and thick. If he wants "Fluffy" use high loft poly batting. Not only will be fluffy but should also warmer secause of the polly.

  10. #10
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Well, my question is when he says "heavier", does he really mean more weight, or does he mean warmer? Because your answer to this question is dependent on what he means. My husband likes heavy quilts and blankets, meaning he likes the weight. So, if my husband said "heavier" to me, I'd use more flannel. I made a 3-layer flannel quilt and it is HEAVY. However, if my husband said "warmer", then I'd switch to wool batting, which is NOT what I would consider a heavy batting. If your husband wants both, then you can double up on the batting. I know a lot of for-show quilters who use W&N 80/20 with a layer of wool on top, because the wool shows their quilting beautifully.

  11. #11
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    I put w/n in all my quilts and yes they are light in weight but warm. However my very first quilt I made many years ago has poly batting in it andit too is light weight but soooooo much warmer than any quilt I have made thus far. I guess if he means heavy you might want to use more than one layer of W/N, whatever works.

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    In my opinion, wool is by far the warmest. It isn't that much more expensive and to me ('cuz I'm cold), is well worth it. The key is then, though, to not quilt very much or really, the best for warmth is to just tie it! It isn't as 'showy' but for snuggly, it is wonderful. Then if you put a heavyweight flannel on the back, it is great and the flannel keeps it from sliding off the bed as well. My mother (who has passed away) made one of those for us when we got married and I have 2 more since. (The old batting can be reprocessed at a woolen mill) It is my warm, useful quilt:-)

  13. #13
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    The Warm company also has a Warm Blend (50% cotton/50% Poly). It is as thin as W&N but has the properties of both types of batting.
    Martina
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    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I put two layers of cotton batting in the quilts I make for my DD. She wants heavy quilts.
    Got fabric?

  15. #15
    Super Member JulieR's Avatar
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    Use more than one quilt! That way you can peel off extra layers when it warms up, or if you're warmer-blooded than he is, and layering is always warmer anyway (clothes, blankets, whatever).

  16. #16
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I use a high loft poly batting, warmer without the weight.
    Another Phyllis
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  17. #17
    Super Member gramajo's Avatar
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    I have 2 quilts on my bed. I like the heaviness of them. In the summer, one is usually pulled down during the night, sometimes both since my bedroom is not air conditioned (and I need to be cold or at least somewhat cool to sleep). Some nights I push the sheet down also. It can get really hot up there. During the winter, I put a down comforter between them. Room is cold, only my nose sticks out from under the covers, but it's so warm and snuggly under everything.

  18. #18
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    I think sometimes that people mistake weight for warmth. I use Warm & Natural or Warm & White and even though it is a thinner batting, they are warm enough for everyone in my house! Old, vintage quilts that many people remember from their youth had wool blankets in them for the batting which gave it weight and warmth.
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  19. #19
    Senior Member Up4BigChal's Avatar
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    I put soft and comfy on the backs, because my girls told me my cotton back quilts were not warm!! Now they love the quilts I make with the soft and comfy backing, JoAnn's has many colors!!
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  20. #20
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    My husband has the same complaint. Not warm enough. Thinsulate had a batting for a while that was great for warmth. I have not been able to find it in a while. There is one called Thermore. It is a poly batting that handles great and is quite warm.

  21. #21
    Super Member copycat's Avatar
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    Going off to college i purchased a blue jean quilt to be used for my dorm bedspread.

    The front of the quilt was patchwork of many shades of denim. The quilt maker included the pockets in some of the patchwork squares. The back of the quilt was red denim yardage sew together to complete the backing. The binding was also the red denim fabric. There was no batting used.

    The quilt made a great bedspread and kept me toasty warm throughout the cold snowy mountain winters.
    Here it is 36 years later and the quilt has been used for chilly football games, picnic blanket and as a toddler play mat....you can hide toys in the pockets and then let the children find them.

    It is amazing that the quilt looks as good as when I purchased it after all the years of use. It is both heavy in weight and very warm. Start saving those blue jeans, I know your DH will love a toasty denim quilt.

  22. #22
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    Warmer doesn't need to be heavier he is just such a freeze baby

  23. #23
    Super Member kuntryquilter's Avatar
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    Get some microfiber fleece quilts. They are so warm, all we use on top of them is a thin quilt.

  24. #24
    Super Member Dodie's Avatar
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    for a heavier warmer batt I use hobbs 80/20 it is very easy to quilt and is heavier than warm and natural it is 80 % cotton and 20 poly

  25. #25
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    I made my first quilt with warm and natural...and yep its light. I use it now as my summer quilt. Then I discovered Quilters Dream and love love love it. It comes in different weights. I have used the Deluxe weight on several quilts and it is nice and toasty. It is also pretty expensive so I only use it in bed quilts, not wallhangings or bags. I have heard a lot of people swear by Hobbs, but I'm so happy with the Quilters Dream I've never wanted to use anything else.
    I am not affiliated in any way with the company..just a happy customer.

    http://quiltersdreambatting.com/dream-cotton.htm

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