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Thread: Warmer!

  1. #26
    Senior Member GammaLou's Avatar
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    Poly batting is what I use for 'fluffy' quits. I have one made with flannel and it is sooooo cozy.

  2. #27
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    I would go to the A/N surplus store and purchase 2 (at least) wool blankets to use as the batting and then tie them. They would be both warm and heavy.

  3. #28
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    Wool batts should never be washed in an agitator washing machine. If you take a quilt that has been washed that way to the woolen mill to have it recarded, they call it "the wash machine special" and they will not touch it. I have several wool batts. Over the years, they are the best for warmth.
    The best way to handle a wool batt is to make a duvet, a cover something like a pillowcase that is tied on, zipped on, buttoned on, or some such way, so that you can wash the cover when needed, but not the actual quilt.

  4. #29
    Super Member AZ Jane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
    Well, my question is when he says "heavier", does he really mean more weight, or does he mean warmer? Because your answer to this question is dependent on what he means. My husband likes heavy quilts and blankets, meaning he likes the weight. So, if my husband said "heavier" to me, I'd use more flannel. I made a 3-layer flannel quilt and it is HEAVY. However, if my husband said "warmer", then I'd switch to wool batting, which is NOT what I would consider a heavy batting. If your husband wants both, then you can double up on the batting. I know a lot of for-show quilters who use W&N 80/20 with a layer of wool on top, because the wool shows their quilting beautifully.
    Exactly what I was thinking. In AZ, a heavy quilt is not practical but I do miss the weight of the quilts back home in VA.
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  5. #30
    Super Member AZ Jane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carolynjo View Post
    I would go to the A/N surplus store and purchase 2 (at least) wool blankets to use as the batting and then tie them. They would be both warm and heavy.
    Another great option I had not thought of!!
    Better to do something imperfectly, than nothing perfectly.
    Done is better than perfect.

  6. #31
    Senior Member newestnana's Avatar
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    I have purchased wool batting from Connecting Threads when they have a sale. Definitely makes it more affordable and they put their batts on sale fairly regularly so keep checking.
    marcia

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  7. #32
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kathbug View Post
    Warmer doesn't need to be heavier he is just such a freeze baby
    You might want to try the batting that is made out of recycled plastic. It sounds awful, but is soft, has a good drape, and is WARM!! Oh, my goodness!! It is warm!! Don't know the name, so maybe someone here can help. It is a light green color. Now that I read older posts...there it is, "Quilter's Dream!"
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  8. #33
    Senior Member chaskaquilter's Avatar
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    My daughter wanted a heavier, puffy looking quilt. She liked the looked of a tied quilt. So I used two layers of Quilters Dream and tied it. Man that thing was soooo heavy moving it around the frame to tie. She was happy with it.

  9. #34
    Junior Member SooBDo's Avatar
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    You could also back it with fleece. Plus, the more thread used in quilting, the flatter your batting, and the less insulating properties it provides. My DH loves a puffy WARM quilt, so I used poly batting and fleece back, and just tacked it on the machine instead of quilting. He LOVES it!

  10. #35
    Super Member Weenween's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kathbug View Post
    I have now made a couple of quilts but they are so thin and light. I used warm and natural for batting. My husband wants me to put the heavier quilt that I had bought before I started quilting. I was just wondering if there is nothing out there that you know of that would be warmer. My DH is a freeze baby!
    If he wants a heavy quilt.Then put an old blanket for batting I have made several and had no complaints about them they are very warm and extra heavy.They also don't have to be quilted as close because they won't pull apart after many many washing.
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  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Up4BigChal View Post
    I put soft and comfy on the backs, because my girls told me my cotton back quilts were not warm!! Now they love the quilts I make with the soft and comfy backing, JoAnn's has many colors!!
    What is soft and comfy? flannel, fleece?

  12. #37
    Senior Member IAmCatOwned's Avatar
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    Poly is warmer. I use warm and natural for quilts intended for late spring through early fall AND for kids (they always seem to be too warm, they complain). For everything else, it is 20/80 or poly. For a super, super warm quilt, you could always get a thick batt and tie it. Joann's used to make a great thick batt, but 8 months after the product came out, they cheapened it. It isn't even half as thick. Instead, I get the poly on the roll at Hancock's. For someone who gets very cold due to health issues, use a double thick. Harder to tie, but oh, so warm.

    Keep in mind his preferences. Some people want warm without the weight. Consider also that thermo batting used for clothing. I"m making my bro a quilt this year that uses that.

  13. #38
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    Has anyone used wool blankets for batting? How did they turn out?

  14. #39
    Senior Member IAmCatOwned's Avatar
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    Nancy, I've used wool blankets (military) to line car blankets. I've had enough wool stuff damaged by moths that I wouldn't otherwise bother with it in a quilt. It's hard enough to keep my socks and sweaters moth free. Once you lose an article to moth damage, you kind of freak out over anything else.

  15. #40
    Senior Member IAmCatOwned's Avatar
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    Nancy, I've used wool blankets (military) to line car blankets. I've had enough wool stuff damaged by moths that I wouldn't otherwise bother with it in a quilt. It's hard enough to keep my socks and sweaters moth free. Once you lose an article to moth damage, you kind of freak out over anything else.

    Just a note - many moths come in via pet food.

  16. #41
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    If wool is not something you want to give a try...I often double bat.. one layer warm and natural one layer poly. I love the effect of the differnent shrink rates... the crinkles from the cotton shrinkage get a bit more hieght/loft from the poly.

  17. #42
    Super Member gramajo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coopah View Post
    You might want to try the batting that is made out of recycled plastic. It sounds awful, but is soft, has a good drape, and is WARM!! Oh, my goodness!! It is warm!! Don't know the name, so maybe someone here can help. It is a light green color. Now that I read older posts...there it is, "Quilter's Dream!"
    It's called Dream Green. I've used it several times and do like it--quilts and drapes nicely. It's a fairly low loft, but is heavier (weight-wise) than a poly batting would be.

  18. #43
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    Quilters Dream cotton is weightier and warmer. Their wool is fantastic both snuggly and warm.
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    APQS Millenium Longarm with Intelliquilter

  19. #44
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    I met a man that wanted me to make him a heavy quilt like he had when he was a kid. I remember my mom telling me they used to use the old blankets the returning vet brought home from the war. They were very scratchy so women used them as batting for their utility quilts. They had already washed them so they weren't likely to shrink. They were tied and not quilted. I do use flannel on the back of my quilts because I like the softness of it.

  20. #45
    Super Member chuckbere15's Avatar
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    Have you tried a heated mattress pad? Love mine! It's like a electric blanket with a thermostat and it has dual control for each side.
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  21. #46
    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by copycat View Post
    Going off to college i purchased a blue jean quilt to be used for my dorm bedspread.

    The front of the quilt was patchwork of many shades of denim. The quilt maker included the pockets in some of the patchwork squares. The back of the quilt was red denim yardage sew together to complete the backing. The binding was also the red denim fabric. There was no batting used.

    The quilt made a great bedspread and kept me toasty warm throughout the cold snowy mountain winters.
    Here it is 36 years later and the quilt has been used for chilly football games, picnic blanket and as a toddler play mat....you can hide toys in the pockets and then let the children find them.

    It is amazing that the quilt looks as good as when I purchased it after all the years of use. It is both heavy in weight and very warm. Start saving those blue jeans, I know your DH will love a toasty denim quilt.
    I agree. My first machine made quilt was a denim raggy. We have it atop our bed in the winter, my husband loves it's warmth and weight.

  22. #47
    Senior Member happyquiltmom's Avatar
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    I use two quilts on each of our beds.

  23. #48
    Senior Member batikmystique's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quilt addict View Post
    The warmth is created by the air space in the batting, if you want more warmth you need something with more air spaces to provide that insulation. So a higher loft batting will provide more warmth. So you can switch to anything that is thicker that way.

    I would agree, wool is a very nice way to go but if economics are an issue then go with poly.

    Yes, this is great advice and the reasoning behind using wool is spot on!
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  24. #49
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    Wool is the warmest but it is more expensive. I often use 2 layers of warm & natural.
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  25. #50
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    Since you mentioned making a couple of quilts, I had an idea that might appeal to your chilly guy there in the cold north. How about sewing them together as a duvet cover? Basically, make them like a big pillowcase and add ties at the open end. It might be possible to do it with large stitches so that they can be restored as quilts at some future time, but meanwhile you'd have a reversible quilt and all your efforts would be put to good use. If having a nice quilt hidden on the underside is not such a good idea, or if they are not the same size, you could make them both into duvet covers by simply sewing a sheet to the under side.
    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." - Voltaire

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