Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Washing and drying flannel fabric for quilting

  1. #1
    Senior Member littlebitoheaven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Illinois/Wisconsin
    Posts
    736
    Blog Entries
    1

    Washing and drying flannel fabric for quilting

    I read the recent thread regarding washing/drying flannel and because I have several pieces of flannel to wash, I wanted to try and minimize raveling and distortion.

    I folded my yardage in half and took my quilting clips and clipped around the raw edges and then washed and dried the pieces. It worked very well. The red and striped fabric are from a LQS and the small pieces are from Wal Mart. All worked the same with this method. So happy that I read that thread and prepared my fabrics first before laundering them.

    Name:  IMG_3862.JPG
Views: 885
Size:  884.0 KB

  2. #2
    Member quiltingshe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Springville, Utah
    Posts
    91
    Blog Entries
    8
    When washing flannel fabric I put the two ends together and then serge them with a big loose stitch. It is quick and easy. When it is dry I just use my rotary cutter to cut off the sergged end and I lose very little fabric.

  3. #3
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    11,273
    Blog Entries
    1
    Great tips for cutting down all those pesky strings/ frayed edges. Thanks.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  4. #4
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    3,582
    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingshe View Post
    When washing flannel fabric I put the two ends together and then serge them with a big loose stitch. It is quick and easy. When it is dry I just use my rotary cutter to cut off the sergged end and I lose very little fabric.
    I use this system for washing a lot of yardage. It works great and like quiltingshe says, you lose very little fabric.
    Patrice S

  5. #5
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    western NY formerly MN, FL, NC, SC
    Posts
    43,977
    Blog Entries
    45
    thanks for sharing your experience
    Nancy in western NY
    before you speak THINK
    T is it True? H is it Helpful? I is it Inspiring? N is it Necessary? K is it Kind?


  6. #6
    Power Poster joyce888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    10,745
    Blog Entries
    1
    Those clips are so expensive I would hesitate to put them in a machine and dryer. I like quiltingshe's method. I have washed and dried LQS flannel with very little fraying.
    Joyce

    Four things you can't recover: The stone.....after the throw. The word......after its said. The occasion.....after its missed. The time......after its gone

  7. #7
    Super Member oksewglad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Between the dashes of a tombstone
    Posts
    9,624
    Blog Entries
    1
    A great idea...large safety pins would also work to hold edges together...
    Don't worry spider.
    I keep house
    casually.
    ---Basho
    I donate quilts to the AAQI.

  8. #8
    Super Member juliea9967's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Twin Falls, ID
    Posts
    1,262
    I just use my pinking blade rotary cutter and trim off a quarter of an inch on each side of the fabric. It doesn't totally eliminate raveling but it does make it manageable.

  9. #9
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    19,860
    I serge the raw edges of fabric with a big, "loose" stitch (3 thread) before it gets put in the washing machine - if I am feeling very frugal, I can easily remove the stitching and lose NO fabric at all. Of course, the needle holes are still there, but they would usually be covered by a seam allowance.

  10. #10
    Super Member judykay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,404
    Blog Entries
    18
    I really like the idea of using the large safety pins, I don't own a surger so I can't do that method and have not had any luck with the pinking blade cutting the fabric properly. I don't use the quilting clips but was wondering if they would break in the wash and/or melt in the dryer. Glad it worked for you and thanks for posting your idea.

  11. #11
    Senior Member IAmCatOwned's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    854
    You can minimize fraying by just washing in the shortest cycle. On my machine, that's the delicate cycle. I get hardly any strings since I switched to doing that. Any bleeding will take place within that short period.

  12. #12
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,945
    I have made several flannel wuilts, and I never washed the flannel. Never had a problem afterwards either.

  13. #13
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Norfolk, VA
    Posts
    5,034
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    I serge the raw edges of fabric with a big, "loose" stitch (3 thread) before it gets put in the washing machine - if I am feeling very frugal, I can easily remove the stitching and lose NO fabric at all. Of course, the needle holes are still there, but they would usually be covered by a seam allowance.
    plus when serging you normally serge off a small amount anyways so it would take care of this issue. Love my serger
    Judy

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.